Watch paralyzed man move robotic arm with his mind

man moves robotic arm with his mind
A man who is paralyzed from the neck down can now move a robotic arm just by thinking about it. Neural prosthetic devices implanted in the brain’s movement center, the motor cortex, have allowed patients with amputations or paralysis [...]
A man who is paralyzed from the neck down can now move a robotic arm just by thinking about it. Neural prosthetic devices implanted in the brain’s movement center, the motor cortex, have allowed patients with amputations or paralysis to control the movement of a robotic limb—one is either connected to or separate from the patient’s own limb. But, current neuroprosthetics produce motion that is delayed and jerky—not the smooth and seemingly automatic gestures associated with natural movement. Now, by implanting neuroprosthetics in a part of the brain that controls not the movement directly but rather our intent to move, researchers have developed a way to produce more natural and fluid motions.
Their findings are reported in the journal Science. Rock, paper, scissors In a clinical trial, researchers successfully implanted such a device in a patient with quadriplegia, giving him the ability to perform a fluid hand-shaking gesture and even play “rock, paper, scissors” using a separate robotic arm.

“When you move your arm, you really don’t think about which muscles to activate and the details of the movement—such as lift the arm, extend the arm, grasp the cup, close the hand around the cup, and so on,” says Richard Andersen, professor of neuroscience at the California Institute of Technology.
“Instead, you think about the goal of the movement. For example, ‘I want to pick up that cup of water. ’ So in this trial, we were successfully able to decode these actual intents, by asking the subject to simply imagine the movement as a whole, rather than breaking it down into myriad components.
” For example, the process of seeing a person and then shaking his hand begins with a visual signal (for example, recognizing someone you know) that is first processed in the lower visual areas of the cerebral cortex.

The signal then moves up to a high-level cognitive area known as the posterior parietal cortex (PPC). Here, the initial intent to make a movement is formed.
These intentions are then transmitted to the motor cortex, through the spinal cord, and on to the arms and legs where the movement is executed. Simpler intent High spinal cord injuries can cause quadriplegia in some patients because movement signals cannot get from the brain to the arms and legs.

As a solution, earlier neuroprosthetic implants used tiny electrodes to detect and record movement signals at their last stop before reaching the spinal cord: the motor cortex. The recorded signal is then carried via wire bundles from the patient’s brain to a computer, where it is translated into an instruction for a robotic limb. However, because the motor cortex normally controls many muscles, the signals tend to be detailed and specific. Researchers wanted to see if the simpler intent to shake the hand could be used to control the prosthetic limb, instead of asking the subject to concentrate on each component of the handshake—a more painstaking and less natural approach.
Andersen and colleagues wanted to improve the versatility of movement that a neuroprosthetic can offer by recording signals from a different brain region—the PPC. “The PPC is earlier in the pathway, so signals there are more related to movement planning—what you actually intend to do—rather than the details of the movement execution,” he says.

“We hoped that the signals from the PPC would be easier for the patients to use, ultimately making the movement process more intuitive.
Our future studies will investigate ways to combine the detailed motor cortex signals with more cognitive PPC signals to take advantage of each area’s specializations. ” Intuitive motion In a clinical trial, designed to test the safety and effectiveness of the new approach, the Caltech team collaborated with surgeons at Keck Medicine at the University of Southern California and the rehabilitation team at Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center. The surgeons implanted a pair of small electrode arrays in two parts of the PPC of the quadriplegic patient.
Each array contains 96 active electrodes that, in turn, each record the activity of a single neuron in the PPC.

The arrays were connected by a cable to a system of computers that processed the signals, decoded the intent of the subject, and controlled output devices that included a computer cursor and a robotic arm developed by collaborators at Johns Hopkins University. After recovering from the surgery, the patient was trained to control the computer cursor and the robotic arm with his mind.

Once training was complete, the researchers saw just what they were hoping for: intuitive movement of the robotic arm. “For me, the most exciting moment of the trial was when the participant first moved the robotic limb with his thoughts. He had been paralyzed for over 10 years, and this was the first time since his injury that he could move a limb and reach out to someone. It was a thrilling moment for all of us,” Andersen says.
“It was a big surprise that the patient was able to control the limb on day one—the very first day he tried,” he adds. “This attests to how intuitive the control is when using PPC activity.

” High fives The patient, Erik G.

Sorto, was also thrilled with the quick results: “I was surprised at how easy it was,” he says. “I remember just having this out-of-body experience, and I wanted to just run around and high-five everybody. ” Over time, Sorto continued to refine his control of his robotic arm, thus providing the researchers with more information about how the PPC works. For example, “we learned that if he thought, ‘I should move my hand over toward to the object in a certain way’—trying to control the limb—that didn’t work,” Andersen says.
“The thought actually needed to be more cognitive. But if he just thought, ‘I want to grasp the object,’ it was much easier.

And that is exactly what we would expect from this area of the brain.
” This better understanding of the PPC will help researchers improve neuroprosthetic devices of the future, Andersen says. “What we have here is a unique window into the workings of a complex high-level brain area as we work collaboratively with our subject to perfect his skill in controlling external devices. ” “In taking care of patients with neurological injuries and diseases—and knowing the significant limitations of current treatment strategies—it is clear that completely new approaches are necessary to restore function to paralyzed patients,” says Charles Y.
Liu, professor of neurological surgery, neurology, and biomedical engineering at USC.

“Direct brain control of robots and computers has the potential to dramatically change the lives of many people. ” Quality of life Advancements in prosthetics like these hold promise for the future of patient rehabilitation, says Mindy Aisen, the chief medical officer at Rancho Los Amigos who led the study’s rehabilitation team.
Although tasks like shaking hands and playing “rock, paper, scissors” are important to demonstrate the capability of these devices, the hope is that neuroprosthetics will eventually enable patients to perform more practical tasks that will allow them to regain some of their independence. “This study has been very meaningful to me. As much as the project needed me, I needed the project,” Sorto says.
“The project has made a huge difference in my life. It gives me great pleasure to be part of the solution for improving paralyzed patients’ lives. “I joke around with the guys that I want to be able to drink my own beer—to be able to take a drink at my own pace, when I want to take a sip out of my beer and to not have to ask somebody to give it to me.
I really miss that independence. I think that if it was safe enough, I would really enjoy grooming myself—shaving, brushing my own teeth.

That would be fantastic.
” To that end, the researchers are already working on a strategy that could enable patients to perform these finer motor skills. The key is to be able to provide particular types of sensory feedback from the robotic arm to the brain. Although Sorto’s implant allowed him to control larger movements with visual feedback, “to really do fine dexterous control, you also need feedback from touch,” Andersen says.
“Without it, it’s like going to the dentist and having your mouth numbed.

It’s very hard to speak without somatosensory feedback. ” The newest devices under development feature a mechanism to relay signals from the robotic arm back into the part of the brain that gives the perception of touch.
“The reason we are developing these devices is that normally a quadriplegic patient couldn’t, say, pick up a glass of water to sip it, or feed themselves. They can’t even do anything if their nose itches. Seemingly trivial things like this are very frustrating for the patients,” Andersen says.
“This trial is an important step toward improving their quality of life. ” The implanted device and signal processors used in the Caltech-led clinical trial were the NeuroPort Array and NeuroPort Bio-potential Signal Processors developed by Blackrock Microsystems in Salt Lake City, Utah. The robotic arm used in the trial was the Modular Prosthetic Limb, developed at the Applied Physics Laboratory at Johns Hopkins.
Sorto was recruited to the trial by collaborators at Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center and at Keck Medicine of USC. The National Institutes of Health, the Boswell Foundation, the Department of Defense, and the USC Neurorestoration Center funded the work.

Source: Caltech The post Watch paralyzed man move robotic arm with his mind appeared first on Futurity.
02

> more news in this sector

A little drop will do it: Tiny grains of lithium can dramatically improve the performance of fusion plasmas

Left: DIII-D tokamak. Right, Cross-section of plasma in which lithium has turned the emitted light green. (Credits: Left, General Atomics / Right: Steve Allen, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory)
Scientists from General Atomics and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have discovered a phenomenon that helps them to improve fusion plasmas, a finding that may quicken the development of fusion energy. Together with [...]
Scientists from General Atomics and the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have discovered a phenomenon that helps them to improve fusion plasmas, a finding that may quicken the development of fusion energy. Together with a team of researchers from across the United States, the scientists found that when they injected tiny grains of lithium into a plasma undergoing a particular kind of turbulence then, under the right conditions, the temperature and pressure rose dramatically.
High heat and pressure are crucial to fusion, a process in which atomic nuclei – or ions – smash together and release energy — making even a brief rise in pressure of great importance for the development of fusion energy. "These findings might be a step towards creating our ultimate goal of steady-state fusion, which would last not just for milliseconds, but indefinitely," said Tom Osborne, a physicist at General Atomics and lead author of the paper.

This work was supported by the DOE Office of Science.
The scientists used a device developed at PPPL to inject grains of lithium measuring some 45 millionths of a meter in diameter into a plasma in the DIII-D National Fusion Facility – or tokamak – that General Atomics operates for DOE in San Diego. When the lithium was injected while the plasma was relatively calm, the plasma remained basically unaltered. Yet as reported this month in a paper in Nuclear Fusion, when the plasma was undergoing a kind of turbulence known as a "bursty chirping mode," the injection of lithium doubled the pressure at the outer edge of the plasma.
In addition, the length of time that the plasma remained at high pressure rose by more than a factor of 10.

Experiments have sustained this enhanced state for up to one-third of a second. A key scientific objective will be to extend this enhanced performance for the full duration of a plasma discharge.
Physicists have long known that adding lithium to a fusion plasma increases its performance. The new findings surprised researchers, however, since the small amount of lithium raised the plasma's temperature and pressure more than had been expected. These results "could represent the birth of a new tool for influencing or perhaps controlling tokamak edge physics," said Dennis Mansfield, a physicist at PPPL and a coauthor of the paper who helped develop the injection device called a "lithium dropper.
" Also working on the experiments were researchers from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of California-San Diego. Conditions at the edge of the plasma have a profound effect on the superhot core of the plasma where fusion reactions take place. Increasing pressure at the edge region raises the pressure of the plasma as a whole.
And the greater the plasma pressure, the more suitable conditions are for fusion reactions. "Making small changes at the plasma's edge lets us increase the pressure further within the plasma," said Rajesh Maingi, manager of edge physics and plasma-facing components at PPPL and a coauthor of the paper.

   Further experiments will test whether the lithium's interaction with the bursty chirping modes – so-called because the turbulence occurs in pulses and involves sudden changes in pitch – caused the unexpectedly strong overall effect.
PPPL, on Princeton University's Forrestal Campus in Plainsboro, N. J. , is devoted to creating new knowledge about the physics of plasmas — ultra-hot, charged gases — and to developing practical solutions for the creation of fusion energy.
Results of PPPL research have ranged from a portable nuclear materials detector for anti-terrorist use to universally employed computer codes for analyzing and predicting the outcome of fusion experiments.

The Laboratory is managed by the University for the U. S.
Department of Energy’s Office of Science, which is the largest single supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, and is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information, please visit science. energy.
gov. Headline: A little drop will do it: Tiny grains of lithium can dramatically improve the performance of fusion plasmasByline: Raphael RosenHighlighted Related Image: Expert Topics: Fusion energyLithiumPlasma physicsTokamaks.
03

> more news in this sector

Wave machine links sea spray to clouds

wave slaps man
In a wooden building overlooking the Pacific Ocean, 3,800 gallons of seawater empty into a long, clear, covered tank—a wave machine. On one side of the 33-meter-long flume is a mechanical paddle, working like a kid in a bathtub [...]
In a wooden building overlooking the Pacific Ocean, 3,800 gallons of seawater empty into a long, clear, covered tank—a wave machine. On one side of the 33-meter-long flume is a mechanical paddle, working like a kid in a bathtub to push water forward. The water builds into a wave that breaks on the machine’s “beach,” a board representing the coastline. As the broken wave falls, bubbles burst, producing sea spray particles that are sucked up into sampling tubes.
Analyzing these particles has let a team of scientists gain insights into how microbes in ocean water control the ability of sea spray droplets to serve as “seeds” for clouds. The work, which appears in ACS Central Science, also demonstrates how changes in the ocean can influence changes in the sky.

The research is expected to help researchers build better climate models.
Sea spray Sea spray is composed of bubbles of ocean water carrying sea salt, bacteria, viruses, and complex organics like proteins, fats, and sugars. “When you change that composition, you start to change the ability of these particles to take up water and grow into cloud droplets,” says project collaborator Chris Cappa, an associate professor in the University of California, Davis, department of civil and environmental engineering. The research team used the wave machine at UC San Diego’s Scripps Institution of Oceanography to recreate a phytoplankton bloom on a large experimental scale.
What does phytoplankton have to do with sea spray? Lots.

The phytoplankton itself doesn’t end up in sea spray. However, as it grows and dies, it produces molecules that can become part of the sea spray droplets when waves break, a process that was previously poorly understood.
Forming clouds The study finds that a critical factor that controls the concentration of these molecules in sea water is their destruction by ocean microbes. This in turn affects the chemical composition of sea spray particles and helps determine how and if the particles can act as cloud seeds. “It’s this combination of production and destruction of these key molecules that ultimately determines the influence of sea spray particles on clouds and global climate,” Cappa says.
The study has provided a new understanding of the importance of how microbes in seawater control the cloud-forming ability of sea spray aerosol, says lead author Kimberly Prather, a UC San Diego chemistry professor and director of the Center for Aerosol Impacts on Climate and the Environment. The study received funding from the National Science Foundation through the Centers for Chemical Innovation program.

Source: UC Davis The post Wave machine links sea spray to clouds appeared first on Futurity.
04

> more news in this sector

Nature or nurture? Twins suggest it’s a tie

sisters in twins t-shirts
The question of whether nature or nurture governs our health is one of science’s great debates. Scientists reviewed almost every twin study across the world from the past 50 years, involving more than 14.5 million twin pairs. The findings, [...]
The question of whether nature or nurture governs our health is one of science’s great debates. Scientists reviewed almost every twin study across the world from the past 50 years, involving more than 14. 5 million twin pairs. The findings, published in Nature Genetics, reveal on average the variation for human traits and diseases is 49 percent genetic, and 51 percent due to environmental factors and/or measurement errors.
“There has still been conjecture over how much variation is caused by genetics and how much is caused by environmental factors—what people call nature versus nurture,” says University of Queensland researcher Beben Benyamin of the Queensland Brain Institute (QBI). “We wanted to resolve that by revisiting almost all the genetic twin studies conducted over the past 50 years, and comparing all of them together,” he says.

Although the contribution of genetic and environmental factors was balanced for most of the traits studied, the research showed there could be significant differences in individual traits.
For example, risk for bipolar disorder was about 70 percent due to genetics and 30 percent due to environmental factors. “When visiting the nature versus nurture debate, there is overwhelming evidence that both genetic and environmental factors can influence traits and diseases,” Benyamin says.  “What is comforting is that, on average, about 50 percent of individual differences are genetic and 50 percent are environmental.
“The findings show that we need to look at ourselves outside of a view of nature versus nurture, and instead look at it as nature and nurture.

” In 69 percent of cases, the study also revealed that individual traits were the product of the cumulative effect of genetic differences. “This means that there are good reasons to study the biology of human traits, and that the combined effect of many genes on a trait is simply the sum of the effect of each individual gene,” Benyamin says.
“This finding has implications for choosing the best strategy to find genes affecting disease. ” Professor Peter Visscher of QBI says the study was performed using publications from the classical twin design, which compares the similarities of identical twins who share all their genes, to those of non-identical twins who share half their genes. “Twin studies have been the main method for researching the genetic and environmental sources of variation between humans for a long time because of the availability of the two types of twins,” says Visscher.
The study involved a meta-analysis of 17,804 traits from 2748 publications between 1958 and 2012, based on data from 14,558,903 twin pairs. The Australian Research Council and National Health and Medical Research Council contributed funding to the study.

Source: University of Queensland The post Nature or nurture? Twins suggest it’s a tie appeared first on Futurity.
05

> more news in this sector

Apache Tree Donation Honors Veterans, Assists Disaster-Stricken Community

HOUSTON, May 22, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- When the city of Moore, OK, dedicates its new Veterans Wall of Honor on Memorial Day, the festivities will be held under the shade of the Trees of Honor - five large water oaks [...]
HOUSTON, May 22, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- When the city of Moore, OK, dedicates its new Veterans Wall of Honor on Memorial Day, the festivities will be held under the shade of the Trees of Honor - five large water oaks signifying the five branches of the military that Apache provided as part of its tree-donation program. As a proud supporter of the military and our veterans, Apache is honored to contribute to this worthy cause and the city as it continues to recover from recent natural disasters. On May 20, 2013, an F5 tornado took the lives of 24 people and caused an estimated $2 billion in damages in Moore.   As part of the city's recovery, Apache provided 11,000 trees to replace those lost in the storm, along with approximately 5,000 others over the years to fulfill other requests.
Moore is one of many communities where Apache's highly successful Tree Grant Program has made a difference. Provided for free to worthy organizations throughout the states where the company operates, the trees - nearly 3.

8 million of them since the program's inception in 2005 - improve wildlife habitats, restore storm-damaged areas and enhance urban neighborhoods.
The Veterans Wall of Honor is a public place for reflection within Moore's Veterans Memorial Park. Approved by voters in 2012, it recognizes past and current Moore residents who have completed honorable service in the U. S.
military.

Its dedication will be held as part of Moore's Memorial Day observation and will include comments from the stakeholders involved in the wall's creation. An Apache representative will be in attendance to speak on the company's behalf and answer any related media inquiries.
Beyond the dedication, Apache is observing Memorial Day through several employee-engagement initiatives. The company held an employee assembly to recognize coworkers who served in the military and present them with commemorative challenge coins. Additionally, employees honored relatives who served with placards on their office doors, and the company participated in Operation Interdependence by providing nonperishable items to send to troops overseas and raising funds to offset the shipping costs.

MEDIA ADVISORY What: Dedication of the new Veterans Wall of Honor in Moore, OKWhen: 10 a. m.

CDT; Monday May 25th, 2015Where: Veterans Memorial Park; 1900 SE 4th St. , Moore, OK, 73160 About Apache Apache Corporation is an oil and gas exploration and production company with operations in the United States, Canada, Egypt, the United Kingdom and Australia. Apache posts announcements, operational updates, investor information and press releases on its website, www. apachecorp.
com, and on its Media and Investor Center mobile application, which is available for free download from the Apple App Store and the Google Play Store.

APA-O Logo - http: //photos. prnewswire. com/prnh/20140116/DA47435LOGO   To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www. prnewswire.
com/news-releases/apache-tree-donation-honors-veterans-assists-disaster-stricken-community-300087673. html SOURCE Apache Corporation News Provided by Acquire Media.

06

> more news in this sector

Apply now to the start-up Idea Challenge !

EIT ICT Labs calls for high-growth European startups active in digital technologies to apply for the 2015 edition of its Idea Challenge contest. The call for application is open from May 6 till July 6. Successful applicants win up to [...]
EIT ICT Labs calls for high-growth European startups active in digital technologies to apply for the 2015 edition of its Idea Challenge contest. The call for application is open from May 6 till July 6. Successful applicants win up to 40,000 Euro and benefit from the pan-European Business Development Accelerator of EIT ICT Labs to become European success stories. Startups can submit their application in one of the eight topics detailed below.

In each topic, finalists will compete for significant benefits: prize money of up to 40,000 Euro; free co-working space; business acceleration in Europe and beyond; and access to an ecosystem of over 130 excellent partner organisations across Europe. With a dedicated team of business developers active in nine European countries as well as in Silicon Valley, EIT ICT Labs will actively support the winners to boost their business internationally.

Prize money in each of the eight topics is: 40,000 Euro for the winner, 25,000 Euro for second place and 15,000 Euro for third place. This yields a significant global financial support of 640,000 Euro by EIT ICT Labs.   From startups to scale-ups While last year’s edition of the contest focused on early-stage startups, this year EIT ICT Labs is reaching out to “scale-ups”, as EIT ICT Labs CEO Willem Jonker explains: “The strength of EIT ICT Labs lies in our pan-European ecosystem. We support fast-growing startups that are typically already being noticed in their home country; we help them scale up their business quickly across Europe and beyond.
”  Must-have eligibility rules are: maximum five years of existence; less than one million Euro of external funding received, incorporated in EU28.

Additionally startups need to meet at least one of the following criteria: existing customers/a public beta, revenue of min 12k Euro or seed investments of min 100k Euro.

Eight topics The contest focuses on eight strategically-chosen topics that EIT ICT Labs has carefully selected and is very active in, both in terms of technical expertise and business network: Health & Wellbeing Smart Spaces Cyber-Physical Systems Future Cloud Cyber Security and Privacy Internet of Things Urban Life and Mobility Smart Energy Systems Ten finalists will pitch in front of a jury in each if the eight topic finals, taking place in Autumn 2015.
07

> more news in this sector

Media Reports About ExxonMobil Lobbying on Iran Sanctions Are Inaccurate

Dateline City: IRVING, Texas IRVING, Texas--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Media reports that ExxonMobil is lobbying the U.S. government on Iran sanctions are inaccurate. “ExxonMobil is not lobbying on Iran sanctions,” said Ken Cohen, vice president of Public and Government Affairs. “Erroneous media [...]
Dateline City: IRVING, Texas IRVING, Texas--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Media reports that ExxonMobil is lobbying the U. S. government on Iran sanctions are inaccurate. “ExxonMobil is not lobbying on Iran sanctions,” said Ken Cohen, vice president of Public and Government Affairs.
“Erroneous media reports resulted from errors in a consultant’s lobbying disclosures. Current U.

S.
law prohibits American companies from operating in Iran. ” Language: English Contact: ExxonMobilMedia Relations, 972-444-1107 Ticker Slug: Ticker: XOM Exchange: NYSE .
08

> more news in this sector

100 days to Andreas Mogensen’s mission

The 100-day countdown begins today for ESA astronaut Andreas Mogensen’s visit to the International Space Station. Following launch on 1 September, he will test new technologies and deliver a fresh spacecraft for the long-stay crew already aboard the orbital [...]
The 100-day countdown begins today for ESA astronaut Andreas Mogensen’s visit to the International Space Station. Following launch on 1 September, he will test new technologies and deliver a fresh spacecraft for the long-stay crew already aboard the orbital complex. .
11

> more news in this sector

'Deep Web Search' May Help Scientists

What you see when you do a basic Web search is only the tip of the iceberg.
Researchers at JPL have joined an effort to harness the benefits of searching the "Deep Web," which could prove useful for both law enforcement and science.
Researchers at JPL have joined an effort to harness the benefits of searching the "Deep Web," which could prove useful for both law enforcement and science. .
12

> more news in this sector

NASA's Curiosity Rover Adjusts Route Up Martian Mountain

Unfavorable Terrain for Crossing Near 'Logan Pass'
NASA's Curiosity Mars rover climbed a hill Thursday to approach an alternative site for investigating a geological boundary, after a comparable site proved hard to reach.
NASA's Curiosity Mars rover climbed a hill Thursday to approach an alternative site for investigating a geological boundary, after a comparable site proved hard to reach. .
13

> more news in this sector

Mars Rover's Laser-Zapping Instrument Gets Sharper Vision

Auto-Focused on Details in
Tests on Mars have confirmed success of a repair to the autonomous focusing capability of the Chemistry and Camera (ChemCam) instrument on NASA's Curiosity Mars rover.
Tests on Mars have confirmed success of a repair to the autonomous focusing capability of the Chemistry and Camera (ChemCam) instrument on NASA's Curiosity Mars rover. .
14

> more news in this sector

Listen up: talk nerdy to me

Here’s a reminder for all engineers: non-engineers are fascinated by what you are doing. So, make sure you are making connections when you talk about your work. In this quick Ted Talk, Penn State communications...Read More >>
Here’s a reminder for all engineers: non-engineers are fascinated by what you are doing. So, make sure you are making connections when you talk about your work. In this quick Ted Talk, Penn State communications…Read More >>.
15

> more news in this sector

Slip sliding away: Graphene and diamonds prove a slippery combination

Slip sliding away: Graphene and diamonds prove a slippery combination May 22, 2015 Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory have found a way to use tiny diamonds and graphene to give friction the slip, creating a [...]
Slip sliding away: Graphene and diamonds prove a slippery combinationMay 22, 2015Scientists at the U. S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory have found a way to use tiny diamonds and graphene to give friction the slip, creating a new material combination that demonstrates the rare phenomenon of “superlubricity. ” .
16

> more news in this sector

Cambodian rivers

Earth observation image of the week: a flooded landscape in Cambodia between the Mekong and Tonlé Sap rivers, also featured on the Earth from Space video programme
Earth observation image of the week: a flooded landscape in Cambodia between the Mekong and Tonlé Sap rivers, also featured on the Earth from Space video programme
20

> more news in this sector

« Back to main news page

Previous | 1 2 3 4 | Next