STATS | Materials Management a Challenge for Shale Operators

Materials management has consistently been a challenge for the oil and gas industry, where the main focus has always been on ensuring material availability, regardless of costs.
Materials management has consistently been a challenge for the oil and gas industry, where the main focus has always been on ensuring material availability, regardless of costs.
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European Utility Week 2014: Amsterdam, Nov. 4-6

Europe is one of the world's most complex and dynamic energy markets. Each European nation faces unique energy issues and market conditions. This year's European Utility Week conference and trade show will highlight a variety of innovative approaches to [...]
Europe is one of the world's most complex and dynamic energy markets. Each European nation faces unique energy issues and market conditions. This year's European Utility Week conference and trade show will highlight a variety of innovative approaches to smart grids, energy regulation, renewable and distributed resources, demand response, reliability and more. As a diamond sponsor of EUW14, Siemens experts and Siemens customers are giving over a dozen keynote speeches and technology presentations.
Plus, the Siemens booth (#1. B30) will provide information, demonstrations and expert insight on the latest smart grid and smart metering solutions, data management and analytics, specialty utility support services, and advanced strategies (such as microgrids, distributed resources, demand response) and much more.

The Smart Grid Watch blog will be following the action and presenting highlights and analysis.

Here's some of what to watch for next week: Tuesday, Nov.

4Opening Keynote: The Utility Business Model -- The creation of utility 2. 0. Dr. Michael Weinhold, CTO Siemens Energy Management Division, will summarize challenges innovations for a truly smart electricity system.

- Watch the livestream 11: 15-11:40 a. m. CETIntelligent electric vehicle charging through smart grid integration. Giovanni Coppola, Sales manager for innovative network technologies, Enel Distribuzione (Italy), will discuss how to make EV charging an attractive, efficient and profitable business for utilities.
Wednesday, Nov. 5The efficient microgrid.

Dr.
Bernd Koch, Director, Siemens Microgrid, Energy Automation, will discuss how deploying microgrids can help utilities add renewable generation sources and energy storage to the grid, while increasing reliability and saving money. Towards a digital grid: Insights to prepare for the future. Maikel van Verseveld, Chief Executive Officer, Omnetric group, will discuss how utilities can gain insight from big data to prepare for the future.
IT/OT Integration in Practice.

Martin Runge, Chief Operating Officer, Omnetric Group, will discuss practical ways that utilities can bridge the silos of information and operational technology, to achieve larger goals through collaboration. Intelligence replaces copper - Distributed Grid Intelligence.
Dr. Hendrik Adolphi, Head of Technical Asset Management, Netze BW (Germany) will discuss how utilities can better adapt to a new energy mix by implementing a distributed intelligence system. Data-driven utility decision making.
Poul Berthelsen, Project Manager, NRGi (Denmark) will discuss how smart meter data can help utilities track down grid problems, even before implementing analytics. Thursday, Nov.

6Challenge meets opportunity: A comprehensive power distribution with totally integrated power. Dr. Andreas Luxa, Director of Business Development and Marketing, Siemens, will discuss how grid operators can address emerging challenges. Demand response, smart energy technology and the European electricity system.
Panel discussion led by Chris King, Head of Regulatory Affairs Smart Grid Solutions and Services, Siemens. Combatting nontechnical losses using smart grid solutions.

Cesar Fernandes, Business Development Manager, CEMIG (Brazil) will discuss how the smart grid can reduce energy theft.
RELATED EVENTS AND INFORMATIONFull details on Siemens at EUW14. On Twitter, follow @Siemens_SG and #EUW14Data and Analytics:How "digitalization" helps utilities bridge silos, build value. How data can be the "glue" that makes IT/OT convergence possible -- and the key driver of long-term business value for the smart grid.
Data to value: Making it work for utilities.

How utilities can move from being overwhelmed by data to profiting from it.
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Tesoro Corporation Delivers on Distinctive Performance Objectives with Record Results in Third Quarter of 2014

SAN ANTONIO, Oct. 30, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Net income of $396 million, or $3.05 per diluted share Delivered $390 million towards California synergies and business improvements year to date Tesoro Logistics LP ("TLLP") to become full-service logistics company with announced [...]
SAN ANTONIO, Oct. 30, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Net income of $396 million, or $3. 05 per diluted share Delivered $390 million towards California synergies and business improvements year to date Tesoro Logistics LP ("TLLP") to become full-service logistics company with announced acquisition of QEP Field Services Closed the West Coast Logistics Assets acquisition with TLLP for $270 million Repurchased $150 million of shares during third quarter Declared a regular quarterly dividend of $0. 30 per share Tesoro Corporation (NYSE:TSO) today reported third quarter 2014 net income of $396 million, or $3.
05 per diluted share compared to net income of $99 million, or $0. 72 per diluted s….

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Lord of the Microrings

Schematic of a PT symmetry microring laser cavity that provides single-mode lasing on demand.
Schematic of a PT symmetry microring laser cavity that provides single-mode lasing on demand. A significant breakthrough in laser technology has been reported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the University [...]
Schematic of a PT symmetry microring laser cavity that provides single-mode lasing on demand. A significant breakthrough in laser technology has been reported by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the University of California (UC) Berkeley.
Scientists led by Xiang Zhang, a physicist with joint appointments at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley, have developed a unique microring laser cavity that can produce single-mode lasing even from a conventional multi-mode laser cavity. This ability to provide single-mode lasing on demand holds ramifications for a wide range of applications including optical metrology and interferometry, optical data storage, high-resolution spectroscopy and optical communications.

“Losses are typically undesirable in optics but, by deliberately exploiting the interplay between optical loss and gain based on the concept of parity-time symmetry, we have designed a microring laser cavity that exhibits intrinsic single-mode lasing regardless of the gain spectral bandwidth,” says Zhang, who directs Berkeley Lab’s Materials Sciences Division and is UC Berkeley’s Ernest S.
Kuh Endowed Chair Professor. “This approach also provides an experimental platform to study parity-time symmetry and phase transition phenomena that originated from quantum field theory yet have been inaccessible so far in experiments. It can fundamentally broaden optical science at both semi-classical and quantum levels” Xiang Zhang Zhang, who also directs the National Science Foundation’s Nano-scale Science and Engineering Center, and is a member of the Kavli Energy NanoSciences Institute at Berkeley, is the corresponding author of a paper in Science that describes this work.
The paper is titled “Single-Mode Laser by Parity-time Symmetry Breaking.

” Co-authors are Liang Feng, Zi Jing Wong, Ren-Min Ma and Yuan Wang. A laser cavity or resonator is the mirrored component of a laser in which light reflected multiple times yields a standing wave at certain resonance frequencies called modes.
Laser cavities typically support multiple modes because their dimensions are much larger than optical wavelengths. Competition between modes limits the optical gain in amplitude and results in random fluctuations and instabilities in the emitted laser beams. “For many applications, single-mode lasing is desirable for its stable operation, better beam quality, and easier manipulation,” Zhang says.
“Light emission from a single-mode laser is monochromatic with low phase and intensity noises, but creating sufficiently modulated optical gain and loss to obtain single-mode lasing has been a challenge. ” Scanning electron microscope image of the fabricated PT symmetry microring laser cavity. While mode manipulation and selection strategies have been developed to achieve single-mode lasing, each of these strategies has only been applicable to specific configurations.
The microring laser cavity developed by Zhang’s group is the first successful concept for a general design. The key to their success is using the concept of the breaking of parity-time (PT) symmetry.

The law of parity-time symmetry dictates that the properties of a system, like a beam of light, remain the same even if the system’s spatial configuration is reversed, like a mirror image, or the direction of time runs backward.
Zhang and his group discovered a phenomenon called “thresholdless parity-time symmetry breaking” that provides them with unprecedented control over the resonant modes of their microring laser cavity, a critical requirement for emission control in laser physics and applications. Liang Feng “Thresholdless PT symmetry breaking means that our light beam undergoes symmetry breaking once the gain/loss contrast is introduced no matter how large this contrast is,” says Liang Feng, lead author of the Science paper, a recent posdoc in Zhang’s group and now an assistant professor with the University at Buffalo. “In other words, the threshold for PT symmetry breaking is zero gain/loss contrast.
” Zhang, Feng and the other members of the team were able to exploit the phenomenon of thresholdless PT symmetry breaking through the fabrication of a unique microring laser cavity.

This cavity consists of bilayered structures of chromium/germanium arranged periodically in the azimuthal direction on top of a microring resonator made from an indium-gallium-arsenide-phosphide compound on a substrate of indium phosphide. The diameter of the microring is 9 micrometers.
“The introduced rotational symmetry in our microring resonator is continuous, mimicking an infinite system,” says Feng. “The counterintuitive discovery we made is that PT symmetry does not hold even at an infinitesimal gain/loss modulation when a system is rotationally symmetric. This was not observed in previous one-dimensional PT modulation systems because those finite systems did not support any continuous symmetry operations.
” Using the continuous rotational symmetry of their microring laser cavity to facilitate thresholdless PT symmetry breaking, Zhang, Feng and their collaborators are able to delicately manipulate optical gain and loss in such a manner as to ultimately yield single-mode lasing. “PT symmetry breaking means an optical mode can be gain-dominant for lasing, whereas PT symmetry means all the modes remain passive,” says Zi-Jing Wong, co-lead author and a graduate student in Zhang’s group. “With our microring laser cavity, we facilitate a desired mode in PT symmetry breaking, while keeping all other modes PT symmetric.
Although PT symmetry breaking by itself cannot guarantee single-mode lasing, when acting together with PT symmetry for all other modes, it facilitates single-mode lasing. ” In their Science paper, the researchers suggest that single-mode lasing through PT-symmetry breaking could pave the way to next generation optoelectronic devices for communications and computing as it enables the independent manipulation of multiple laser beams without the “crosstalk” problems that plague today’s systems.

Their microring laser cavity concept might also be used to engineer optical modes in a typical multi-mode laser cavity to create a desired lasing mode and emission pattern.
“Our microring laser cavities could also replace the large laser boxes that are routinely used in labs and industry today,” Feng says. “Moreover, the demonstrated single-mode operation regardless of gain spectral bandwidth may create a laser chip carrying trillions of informational signals at different frequencies. This would make it possible to shrink a huge datacenter onto a tiny photonic chip.
” This research was supported by the Office of Naval Research MURI program.

Additional Information For more about the research of Xiang Zhang go here For more about the research of Liang Feng go here #  #  # Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory addresses the world’s most urgent scientific challenges by advancing sustainable energy, protecting human health, creating new materials, and revealing the origin and fate of the universe. Founded in 1931, Berkeley Lab’s scientific expertise has been recognized with 13 Nobel prizes.
The University of California manages Berkeley Lab for the U. S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science.
For more, visit www. lbl. gov.
DOE’s Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, and is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information, please visit the Office of Science website at science.

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NYC’s new frog finally gets a name

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Are chemicals shrinking otter penis bones?

  • Website aims for wildlife-safe highways
  • "Most insecticides used today take a carpet-bombing approach, killing [bugs] indiscriminately and sometimes even hurting humans and other animals," says Frank Bosmans. "The more specific a toxin's target, the less dangerous it is for everything else." (Credit: Leon Dafonte/Flickr)
  • "We find that electric organs in fish and these pathways in our hearts share some of the same regulatory genes," says Harold Zakon. (Credit: Joachim S. Müller/Flickr)
  • Beetle bearing down on ash trees
  • frogwhine_525
    It’s taken more than half a century, but scientists have proved that a new frog species exists in New York City. In fact, the new species is living in wetlands from Connecticut to North Carolina. “Even though he was clearly [...]
    It’s taken more than half a century, but scientists have proved that a new frog species exists in New York City. In fact, the new species is living in wetlands from Connecticut to North Carolina. “Even though he was clearly on to something, the claim Carl Kauffeld made in his 1937 paper fell short,” says Rutgers doctoral candidate Jeremy Feinberg. “We had the benefits of genetic testing and bioacoustic analysis that simply weren’t available to Kauffeld to prove that even though this frog might look like the two other leopard frogs in the area, it was actually a third and completely separate species.
    ” In the paper in PLOS ONE, Feinberg and a team of seven other researchers reveal the scientific name for the new species: Rana kauffeldi. The leopard frog, first encountered by Feinberg on Staten Island six years ago not far from the Statue of Liberty, will be commonly referred to as the Atlantic Coast Leopard Frog.

    Overdue credit During his career, Kauffeld, who died in 1974 at age 63, worked as the director of the Staten Island Zoo and at the American Museum of Natural History.
    He wrote many books about amphibians and reptiles and is considered to have been an authority on the subject. Still, although Kauffeld’s research was initially recognized by some of his colleagues, Feinberg says Kauffeld faced considerable scrutiny and failed to gain any lasting support for his proposal. “After some discussion, we agreed that it just seemed right to name the species after Carl Kauffeld,” says Feinberg.
    “We wanted to acknowledge his work and give credit where we believe it was due even though it was nearly 80 years after the fact.

    ” Feinberg, the lead author, encountered the new species six years ago in one of the most developed, heavily populated areas in the world. Two years ago, he and colleagues—who had worked together to show that this frog was a brand new species—made the initial announcement.
    Today, the new research paper, completes that discovery. The paper provides the critical evidence needed to formally describe and name the new frog and also presents information on the distribution, ecology, and conservation status of this species. Look-alike frogs Historically, the new frog was confused with two closely related species—including one to the north and one to the south—because it looks so similar.
    As a result, it was not noticed as a distinct species. Related Articles On FuturityAre chemicals shrinking otter penis bones?University of California, DavisWebsite aims for wildlife-safe highwaysJohns Hopkins UniversitySpider venom mix-up could make insecticides saferMichigan State UniversityGenome reveals how electric fish got 'high voltage'Cornell UniversityBeetle bearing down on ash treesUniversity of Texas at AustinRobot frog woos ladies despite bad whine But after Feinberg’s encounter in 2008, modern technology stepped in. Using molecular and bioacoustic techniques to examine the genetics and mating calls of leopard frogs from various parts of Northeast, the scientists were able to positively determine that the frog found living in the marshes of Staten Island was, in fact, a new species that might also be hiding in ponds and wetlands beyond New York and New Jersey.
    The news, Feinberg says, became a call to arms to biologists, hobbyists, and frog enthusiasts from Massachusetts to Virginia to go out, look, and listen in order to determine if the new frog—mint-gray to light olive green with medium to dark spots—could be found beyond the New York metropolitan area. Over the last two years, many frog-lovers, including some involved with the North American Amphibian Monitoring Project—a government project that observes frog habitats to determine if populations are declining—have provided crucial information about where the frogs are living, what they look like and how they sound.

    One volunteer, in fact, noticed the new species’ unusual and distinct “chuck” call, and provided information that ultimately helped confirm populations of the new species in both Virginia and North Carolina.
    “If there is a single lesson to take from this study, it’s that those who love nature and want to conserve it need to shut down their computers, get outside, and study the plants and animals in their own backyards,” says coauthor Brad Shaffer, professor in UCLA’s department of ecology and evolutionary biology. ‘Hiding in plain sight’ Shaffer describes the discovery as biological detective work. Although fun and satisfying work, the goal is to protect the biodiversity of the planet, he says.
    Scientists say the fact that this new species—which brings the total number of leopard frogs in the world to 19—remained under the radar in a highly populated area spanning eight east coast states and several major North American cities stretching 485 miles is remarkable.

    “It is incredible and exciting that a new species of frog could be hiding in plain sight in New York City and existing from Connecticut to North Carolina,” says Joanna Burger, professor in the department of cell biology and neuroscience and Feinberg’s advisor at Rutgers. “The process of recognizing, identifying, and documenting a new species is long and arduous but it is important for our understanding of the wide ranging wildlife in urban as well as other environments.
    ” Scientists from Rutgers, UCLA, UC Davis, the University of Alabama, Yale, Louisiana State University, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, and the New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife contributed to the work.

    Source: Rutgers The post NYC’s new frog finally gets a name appeared first on Futurity.
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  • Brain ‘architecture’ differs in kids with dyslexia

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    Duke University

    College drinking: No fear, all reward raises risk

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  • "Because fungi have historically been a rich source of biologically useful compounds, we thought it would be worth screening them to determine their activity," says T. Chris Gamblin, adding that three were able to block aggregation of the tau protein that is linked to Alzheimer’s disease. (Credit: Kathie Hodge/Flickr)
  • "Teachers may be able to help children master these kind of computations earlier, and more easily, giving them a wedge into the system," Lisa Feigenson says. (Credit: "math problem" via Shutterstock)
  • "This is physical evidence within the brain that highly sensitive individuals respond especially strongly to social situations that trigger emotions, in this case of faces being happy or sad," says Arthur Aron. (Credit: mariahflemming/Flickr)
  • no2pencil_1
    The brains of children with dyslexia may be structured differently, according to neuroimaging of the thalamus, the part of the brain that serves as its connector. The behavioral characteristics of dyslexia—a reading disorder that affects up to 17 percent of [...]
    The brains of children with dyslexia may be structured differently, according to neuroimaging of the thalamus, the part of the brain that serves as its connector. The behavioral characteristics of dyslexia—a reading disorder that affects up to 17 percent of the population—are well documented, including struggling to recognize and decode words as well as trouble with comprehension and reading aloud.

    Related Articles On FuturityDuke UniversityCollege drinking: No fear, all reward raises riskCarnegie Mellon UniversityLower risk of hypertension for seniors who volunteer University of KansasFungus may block Alzheimer's proteinJohns Hopkins University'Number sense' lets kids do basic algebraStony Brook University'Highly tuned' people react strongly to happy facesUniversity of ChicagoStress hormone on the back-to-school list? While many dyslexia studies focus on the cerebral cortex, the new research, published in the journals Brain Connectivity and Brain Research, targeted the sub-cortical thalamus region. The thalamus serves as the brain’s connector—relaying sensory and motor signals back to the cerebral cortex via nerve fibers that are part of the brain’s “white matter. ” The thalamus also regulates alertness, consciousness, and sleep. Evaluating 40 children ages 8 to 17 years, evenly divided between typically developing readers and those with developmental dyslexia, the researchers used diffusion tensor imaging to visually map the structure of the brain in an effort to better understand the role of the thalamus in reading behavior.
    “A different pattern of thalamic connectivity was found in the dyslexic group in the sensorimotor and lateral prefrontal cortices,” says Laurie Cutting, professor of special education and professor of psychology and human development, radiology, and pediatrics at Vanderbilt University. “These results suggest that the thalamus may play a key role in reading behavior by mediating the functions of task-specific cortical regions.

    Such findings lay the foundation for future studies to investigate further neurobiological anomalies in the development of thalamo-cortical connectivity in individuals with dyslexia.
    ” Different connections In a related study, researchers examined connectivity patterns in a cortical region known to be especially important for reading: the left occipito-temporal region, sometimes referred to as the visual word form area. While there have been many functional MRI studies examining this region, there is not a consensus on the region’s functionalities, and studies of the visual word form area’s structural connectivity are relatively new. Cutting and her colleagues used diffusion MRI to study the structural connectivity patterns in the left occipito-temporal region and surrounding areas of the brain in 55 children.
    “Findings suggest that the architecture of the left occipito-temporal region connectivity is fundamentally different between children who are typically developing readers and those with dyslexia,” Cutting says.

    The typically developing readers showed greater connectivity to linguistic regions than the dyslexic group. Those with dyslexia showed greater connectivity to visual and parahippocampal (memory encoding and retrieval) regions.
    The data were collected at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine’s Kennedy Krieger Institute and the Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. The work was conducted in part using the resources of the Advanced Computing Center for Research and Education at Vanderbilt University.

    Source: Vanderbilt University The post Brain ‘architecture’ differs in kids with dyslexia appeared first on Futurity.
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  • Facts Not Fear: Will we find a cure?

    In the last of our “Facts Not Fear” Ebola Q&A posts we focus on the research being done to find effective vaccines and treatments for Ebola. The Wellcome Trust has partnered with a number of organisations to fund vaccine [...]
    In the last of our “Facts Not Fear” Ebola Q&A posts we focus on the research being done to find effective vaccines and treatments for Ebola. The Wellcome Trust has partnered with a number of organisations to fund vaccine safety trials, research potential therapies, and we initiated a fast-tracked funding scheme for public health research in this area. This post aims to help answer some of the frequently asked questions about the work being done, and how long it might take to move from positive research results to delivery of vaccinations or treatments to those who need them most.   Who is most at risk of contracting Ebola? Currently front-line workers in the West African countries affected by Ebola – for example those treating or caring for patients, burial workers, cleaners – are most at risk of contracting Ebola.
    Next most at risk are other people in these affected countries who have close contact with patients. The risk to the general population in places like the UK is very limited.

    Is there a cure for Ebola? At the moment there is no cure for Ebola.
    The treatment that is currently available includes supportive care such as fluid management, antipyretics (medication that reduces fever), analgesics (painkillers) and anti-emetics (drugs against vomiting and nausea).   What’s the difference between a vaccination and a therapy/treatment? Vaccines aim to provide protection to healthy people at risk of contracting the disease, whereas therapies aim to treat those who have already contracted the disease. We heard about experimental treatments like ZMapp – what are they and why are we not using them on more people? ZMapp is an investigational drug that comprises three antibodies that target a surface protein of the Ebola virus.
    There is some evidence that the drug can be effective in animal models, however, there is no clear evidence that the treatment works in humans.

    Although ZMapp was used compassionately in a few sick healthcare workers, it has not yet been tested in any clinical trials to determine its true effectiveness. Before potential treatments can be rolled out to everyone they need to be adequately tested for their safety and efficacy.
    This requires safety trials in healthy volunteers first, followed by efficacy trials in volunteers with Ebola disease. There are some potential drugs that have already been tested in humans for other diseases but have not been tried till now to see if they work against Ebola. Such drugs can go straight into efficacy trials.
    In order to do these trials you need sufficient doses, and currently ZMapp doses have been depleted. As ZMapp is made in tobacco plants the whole process can take as long as six months to grow. Researchers are working hard to scale up production and to investigate alternative quicker non-plant mechanisms to make the drug, but this is not a simple task.
    There are supplies of other candidate drugs which may be deployed. We hear that lots of research is being funded – when will we get results/a treatment that we can use? The scientific community is working hard with the pharmaceutical industry, governments, civil society, philanthropic foundations and the WHO to fast-track research into potential treatments and vaccines.

    Currently vaccine safety trials are being conducted in healthy volunteers in Europe, USA and Africa.
    If there are no safety issues the next step will be to carry out trials to test their efficacy in at risk volunteers in the affected countries. There is hope that these could start as early as December 2014, but even then clear results may not be available for several months. It is really important that we move fast, but we also have to move safely.
    We also have to accept the reality that new drugs and vaccines will need to be tested in the three most affected countries, but their health resources are stretched to the limit and beyond, so it is not going to be easy for trials to be conducted against this background.

    Read our previous “Facts not Fear” posts to find out why this outbreak has been so hard to control and what needs to be done to stop the spread of Ebola. Visit the Wellcome Trust news pages to find out what the Trust has been doing to help fund Ebola research.

    Filed under: Infectious Disease, Q&A Tagged: ebola, Facts Not Fear, FAQ
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    OpenADR standard: Better, simpler demand response through automation

    Demand response is a powerful tool, but it can be challenging for utilities and customers to gain maximum benefit from DR. The more DR can be automated, the easier it is to deploy this capacity quickly and flexibly in [...]
    Demand response is a powerful tool, but it can be challenging for utilities and customers to gain maximum benefit from DR. The more DR can be automated, the easier it is to deploy this capacity quickly and flexibly in response to grid challenges or opportunities. The OpenADR standard enables DR to be "baked in" to systems and equipment at all levels, streamlining the process of turning signals into action. Historically, the main difficulties with DR have involved people, communication and time.
    The whole process -- from utility staff determining when and how much demand response to call for, to customers taking action to shed load, to verifying participation and awarding incentives -- involves lot of people, communication and steps. The OpenADR Alliance is a collaborative effort to standardize how electricity providers and system operators communicate DR signals with each other and with customers -- including direct communication with equipment on customer premises.

    OpenADR employs a common protocol that works over existing IP (Internet Protocol) communications networks -- similar to how http is a common protocol for web browsers.
    This provides two-way communication between a utility demand response management system (DRMS, which controls DR events) and devices in the field that actually shed load. Many equipment vendors and solution providers, including Siemens, now support OpenADR in their offerings -- giving utilities and customers more DR options than ever before. The OpenADR standard creates an ecosystem of DR-enabled products:Newer OpenADR-enabled devices can be connected directly to DR communication channels, ready to activate load-shedding strategies.
    The OpenADR capability can be implemented either directly in the field device, or via cloud services used to access and control field devices (such as those operated by Ecobee and other smart thermostat vendors -- opening up considerable DR potential in the residential market).

    Older equipment can be integrated into DR via an OpenADR gateway controller, which interfaces with the customer's building automation system or device controllers. In practice, OpenADR means that when a utility DRMS transmits a load-shed signal, the customer's building automation system or device controllers respond by executing a set of actions -- such as changing a temperature setpoint, or turning off every second light in a hallway.
    These actions, and their parameters, are designated in advance by the customer -- ensuring that customers ultimately have control over how DR events might affect their operations and facilities. This control fosters confidence that can help increase customer willingness to participate in DR programs. Now that OpenADR 2.
    0 has been published, the main priority of the OpenADR Alliance is to help utilities understand how OpenADR can enhance their operations and business. According to Pierre Mullin, Head of R&D for Siemens Demand Response Management Products, the main value proposition of OpenADR for utilities is that this standard offers maximum flexibility for enrolling potential loads in DR programs. It also eliminates most technical barriers to DR adoption.
    OpenADR offers core structures to allow utilities to automatically execute price-driven transactional events. It also can help coordinate complementary resources.

    For instance, a utility could send a signal well in advance of a planned DR event, telling a customer's refrigeration unit to increase its setpoint.
    This pre-chilling effectively becomes thermal energy storage capacity, giving the customer more load-shedding ability during the DR event. For third parties (such as solution providers or energy service companies), OpenADR maximizes the return on energy efficiency investments. "It used to be that DR and energy efficiency worked at odds with each other," said Mullin.
    "But now solution providers find that if you introduce OpenADR-compatible technology while implementing energy efficiency measures, that ends up yielding another revenue stream that increases the return on investment and reduces the payback for energy efficiency.

    "Looking ahead, in addition to managing load-shedding capacity, OpenADR also can help utilities implement sophisticated strategies such as virtual power plants, responding in real time to fluctuations in renewable energy output, and distributed generation. The best way to keep abreast of these opportunities is to join the OpenADR Alliance.
    Also, look for opportunities to put OpenADR to work, starting with existing DR programs and customers.
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    Reading the heavens with your phone

    Two groups have released early versions of apps to turn your smart phone into a cosmic ray detector. Cosmic rays, most of which come speeding through the Milky Way from outside of our solar system, crash into the Earth’s atmosphere [...]
    Two groups have released early versions of apps to turn your smart phone into a cosmic ray detector. Cosmic rays, most of which come speeding through the Milky Way from outside of our solar system, crash into the Earth’s atmosphere at energies high enough to put the Large Hadron Collider to shame. And all it takes to catch such an event is a smart phone. Two groups are working on apps to turn smart phones into roving particle detectors.
    One group aims to educate, while the other is on a quest to create the largest cosmic ray detector array in the world. Smart phone cameras contain sensors that help convert particles of light into the digital images that appear on your screen.

    Astronomers use high-powered versions of these sensors to study the light from faraway galaxies.
    When a cosmic ray hits the Earth’s atmosphere, it produces a shower of energetic particles that rain down on the planet. When one of those particles hits a sensor, it leaves a temporary mark—usually a single hit pixel, but sometimes a multi-pixel streak. If these events were more common or obtrusive, they’d be the scourge of the digital photography world.
    As it is, it takes a little more work to find them, something the app developers are happy to do.

    Justin Vandenbroucke, a physicist at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and Levi Simons, director of citizen science at the LA Makerspace in Los Angeles, lead one group, which for the past four years has been working to build an app that teachers and students can use to create their own cosmic ray experiments. It’s called DECO, Distributed Electronic Cosmic-ray Observatory.
    “Instead of reading about particle interactions, students can see them on their own phones,” Vandenbroucke says. “We’re working with high school students to test the app, and we’re working with high school teachers to develop the curriculum. ” Vandenbroucke met Simons, then a physics-grad-student-turned-teacher, when they were paired together at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory through STAR, a research experience program run through California Polytechnic State University.
    Their project began as an attempt to resurrect a defunct program in which students detected cosmic rays from the rooftops of schools in Southern California. They say they envision students around the world comparing results. Young scientists in Madison and Boulder could compare data to examine the effect of altitude on cosmic ray detection.
    Vandenbroucke and Simons can also see students comparing their findings with magnetic field data to see if both are affected during a solar storm. The other app-developing group has somewhat different plans.

    Physicists Daniel Whiteson of the University of California, Irvine, and Michael Mulhearn of UC Davis met while working on competing experiments at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory during grad school.
    They now work on competing experiments at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. For the past year, they have been designing an app called CRAYFIS that could turn a network of smart phones into the world’s largest cosmic ray shower detector. “Nobody’s built a device of this size before,” Whiteson says.
    The two say that, if enough people in dense groups download the app, they will be able to detect multiple particles in showers caused by high-energy cosmic rays.

    Getting a clear picture could reveal information such as the original direction of the cosmic ray. “Five hundred to 1000 phones per square kilometer is the density where we start being able to make measurements,” Mulhearn says.
    The app can also run on tablets. Whiteson and Mulhearn posted a paper about the app to the arXiv last week. Their app has the ability to run automatically when the light contamination is blocked and the phone is charging (to avoid draining the battery).
    The app sends data to a central server only when the phone is connected to wifi. “The idea is to be very unobtrusive to the user,” Mulhearn says. “It will never complain.
    It just waits until the conditions are right. ” Vandenbroucke and Simons have received funding from the American Physical Society, the Knight Foundation and the Simon-Strauss Foundation.

    For Whiteson and Mulhearn, the work so far has been a labor of love.
    The two groups, which have been working independently, recently made contact and have begun to discuss joining forces.   Like what you see? Sign up for a free subscription to symmetry! .
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    Why Are So Many People Still Bypassing the Flu Shot?

    Flu season in the United States typically runs from November through March, with the peak coming in January and February. But people can catch the flu both earlier than the usual start time and after the usual end of [...]
    Flu season in the United States typically runs from November through March, with the peak coming in January and February. But people can catch the flu both earlier than the usual start time and after the usual end of the season. In addition, the severity of the flu season can vary with from 3,000 to 49,000 U. S.
    deaths in a given year, an average of more than 200,000 hospitalizations and millions of illnesses, according to the U. S.

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
    Flu shot season has a shorter time table, so many pharmacies and doctors’ office that are well stocked at the moment can run out before Christmas, making it difficult for people who put off their vaccinations to find a vaccine location and protect themselves. And despite a yearly campaign to get people to roll their arms up, less fewer than half of adults and less than 60 percent of kids received a flu shot last year. NewPublicHealth recently spoke with Carolyn Bridges, MD, the CDC’s associate director for adult immunizations about what keeps people from getting the flu shot and how more people can be encouraged to get the vaccine.

    NewPublicHealth: What is it that keeps people from getting the shot? Carolyn Bridges: I think there are a number of things. Certainly, we have pretty good awareness about the recommendations for the influenza vaccine, although some people may just not realize that they are potentially at risk. The current recommendations call for all persons six months of age and older to get an annual flu vaccine, with rare exceptions. But the vaccine recommendations have changed over time and in the last few years have been broadened to include [just about] everyone.

    For some people the message hasn’t gotten to them that in fact they are now included in the group recommended for a yearly flu vaccine NPH: What common misconceptions do people still have about the flu vaccine? Bridges: In terms of the safety, some people question or are worried about getting the flu from the flu vaccine. That’s still a common comment that we receive. Sometimes people will certainly have body aches or some tenderness in the arm where they get their flu vaccine, but that’s certainly not the same as getting influenza, and those symptoms generally are very self-limited and go away within two to three days. But the flu vaccine cannot cause the flu.
      Flu vaccination of pregnant women is also very important; that decreases risk of severe disease in pregnant women, a group that is actually at higher risk of severe complications from flu. And vaccinating pregnant women also decreases the risk of severe disease in their infants up to the first six months of life.

    Infants are at the highest risk for severe complications of influenza, but they cannot be vaccinated until age six months.

    NPH: Does getting the flu shot guarantee you won’t get the flu? Bridges: No. The flu vaccine, while it is the best protection for influenza, is not a perfect vaccine. Effectiveness has in recent years been around 50 to 60 percent, with the vaccine you decrease your risk by half or more, but there will be some people who do get the flu even after getting the vaccine, but are likely to have much milder cases than they might have without the vaccine. And, the more people vaccinated, the more benefits we can see in terms of reduced illness in communities.
    There have been studies in Canada and elsewhere that show that when you get vaccination rates up to 80 percent, you can see a significant reduction in the community for flu even among people who didn’t get their own shot.

    NPH: Once adults have the flu vaccine on their minds, what other immunizations should they be thinking about? Bridges: Vaccinations recommended for certain adults include ones to protect against shingles and pneumonia and many people at risk still have not gotten those shots. Go here to find more information from the CDC on adult vaccines.

    >>Bonus Links: A Flu Quiz for the Public Find a flu shot in your neighborhood. .
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    Public Health News Roundup: October 30

    NPH_Public_Health_News_Roundup_Header
    EBOLA UPDATE: WHO Officials See ‘Glimmers of Hope’ in Liberia as New Case Rate Declines ( New PublicHealth is monitoring the public health crisis in West Africa.) There are “glimmers of hope” in [...]
    EBOLA UPDATE: WHO Officials See ‘Glimmers of Hope’ in Liberia as New Case Rate Declines(NewPublicHealth is monitoring the public health crisis in West Africa. )There are “glimmers of hope” in Liberia as officials from the World Health Organization (WHO) say the rate of new Ebola cases appears to be declining for the first time since the outbreak began. Still, an official with the global health agency said they are still very much concerned and on guard. “It’s like saying your pet tiger is under control,” said Bruce Aylward, the WHO’s assistant director-general in charge of the operational response, according to The Washington Post.
    “This is a very, very dangerous disease” and “the danger now is that instead of a steady downward trend we end up with an oscillating trend where the virus goes up and down” because areas become reinfected. Read more on Ebola.

    Study: Infant’s Birthweight Tied to Disease Risk Later in LifeAn infant’s size at birth may help predict their health later in life, with babies who are heavier have less of a risk for future disease, according to a new study in The FASEB Journal. Researchers based their findings on an analysis of cord blood of newborn babies from mothers with raised glucose levels during late pregnancy and blood taken later. "These findings support the hypothesis that common long-term variation in the activity of genes established in the womb may underpin links between size at birth and risk for adult disease," said Claire R. Quilter, Ph.
    D. , study author from the Mammalian Molecular Genetics Group, Department of Pathology at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom.

    "If confirmed these could be important markers of optimal fetal growth and may be the first step along a path to very early disease prevention in the womb.
    " Read more on maternal and infant health. FDA Approves New Meningitis VaccinesThe U. S.
    Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the first vaccine approved to prevent invasive meningococcal disease in the United States.

    The drug is to prevent  Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B is approved for individuals ages 10 to 25 years. Approximately 500 total cases of meningococcal disease were reported in the United States in 2012, with 160 having been causes by serogroup B.
    “Recent outbreaks of serogroup B Meningococcal disease on a few college campuses have heightened concerns for this potentially deadly disease,” said Karen Midthun, MD, director of the FDA’s Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, in a release. “The FDA’s approval of Trumenba provides a safe and effective way to help prevent this disease in the United States. ” Read more on vaccines.
    .
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    HP announces a blending of the physical and the virtual

    sprout.png
    Hopefully, anyone who is interested in 3D printing saw the two announcements by HP yesterday. They focused on having a Blended Reality that will change how we interact with technology and the world around us. The first announcement should [...]
    Hopefully, anyone who is interested in 3D printing saw the two announcements by HP yesterday. They focused on having a Blended Reality that will change how we interact with technology and the world around us. The first announcement should clear up the long rumored entry by HP into 3D printing. This multi-jet fusion approach of ‘page-wide’ printing is significantly faster than traditional 3D extrusion based printing.
    It is also much more finely grained and accurate. I handled some of these prototype parts a while back and I found it very exciting, when compared to any of the 3D printing efforts I’ve done myself.

    The potential ability to manipulate color, finish and flexibility within the same part was something I found unique.
    HP has a very strong materials science foundation ever since HPs commercial definition of ink jet printing in the early 80s and this approach really takes advantage of that experience. The other shoe that dropped was Sprout. This link has numerous movies about how others have used this technology in their work.
    I’ve seen somewhat similar techniques applied in research projects for a number of years now, but not a commercial solution that you can ‘just buy’ that integrates touch, 2 and 3D scanning and multiple displays in such a seamless and functional way.

    Although I have talked with people about this effort about a year ago, it is great to see it become a reality – and I’m anxious to get my hands into its platform. There are some interesting perspectives that if you do work that involves your hands it may be the computer for you and the view that it is a solution looking for a problem – I can see easily see its use.
    One of the things I find most exciting about these products that they enable a different kind of creative environment that functions as a springboard for greater creativity. These sort of environmental enabling view will be an ever increasing part of new business value generation in the future.
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    Phase 2 Objective Response Rate and Survival Data for Opdivo (nivolumab) in Heavily Pre-treated Advanced Squamous Cell Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer to be Presented at the 2014 Chicago Multidisciplinary Symposium on Thoracic Oncology

    Dateline City: PRINCETON, N.J. In CheckMate -063, the objective response rate was 15% in patients treated with single agent Opdivo and median duration of response was not reached 41% of Opdivo-treated patients were alive at one year Types and [...]
    Dateline City: PRINCETON, N. J. In CheckMate -063, the objective response rate was 15% in patients treated with single agent Opdivo and median duration of response was not reached 41% of Opdivo-treated patients were alive at one year Types and frequency of treatment-related adverse events were consistent with early clinical experience and managed using recommended treatment algorithms Rolling submission initiated with FDA in April based on CheckMate 063; company expects to complete submission by year end PRINCETON, N. J.
    --(BUSINESS WIRE)--Bristol-Myers Squibb Company (NYSE:BMY) today announced results from CheckMate -063, a Phase 2 single-arm, open-label study of Opdivo (nivolumab), an investigational PD-1 immune checkpoint inhibitor, administered as a single agent in patients with advanced squamous cell non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have progressed after at least two prior systemic treatments with 65% receiving three or more prior therapies (n=117).

    Language: English Contact: Bristol-Myers SquibbMedia:Sarah Koenig, 609-252-4145sarah. koenig@bms. comorChrissy Trank, 609-252-3418Christina. trank@bms.
    comorInvestors:Ranya Dajani, 609-252-5330ranya. dajani@bms.

    comorRyan Asay, 609-252-5020ryan.
    asay@bms. com Ticker Slug: Ticker: BMY Exchange: NYSE read more.
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    Bristol-Myers Squibb and Lonza Expand Manufacturing Agreement

    Dateline City: NEW YORK & BASEL, Switzerland NEW YORK & BASEL, Switzerland--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Bristol-Myers Squibb Company (NYSE:BMY) and Lonza today announced a multi-year expansion of their existing biologics manufacturing agreement. The contract expansion will include the production of commercial quantities [...]
    Dateline City: NEW YORK & BASEL, Switzerland NEW YORK & BASEL, Switzerland--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Bristol-Myers Squibb Company (NYSE:BMY) and Lonza today announced a multi-year expansion of their existing biologics manufacturing agreement. The contract expansion will include the production of commercial quantities of a second Bristol-Myers Squibb biologic medicine at Lonza’s mammalian manufacturing facility in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. Financial terms were not disclosed.

    Language: English Contact: Bristol-Myers SquibbMedia:Laura Hortas, +1 609-252-4587laura. hortas@bms. comorFrederick Egenolf, +1 609-252-4875frederick. egenolf@bms.
    comorInvestors:Ranya Dajani, +1 609-252-5330ranya. dajani@bms.

    comorRyan Asay, +1 609-252-5020ryan.
    asay@bms. comorLonzaMedia:Dominik Werner, +41 61 316 8798dominik. werner@lonza.
    comorConstance Ward, +41 61 316 8840constance.

    ward@lonza. comorColleen Floreck, +1 201 316 9290colleen.
    floreck@lonza. comorInvestors:Dirk Oehlers, +41 61 316 8540dirk. oehlers@lonza.
    com Ticker Slug: Ticker: BMY Exchange: NYSE read more.
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    On Ebola, Can There be Too Much Coverage?

    NewPublicHealth began its 2014 Ebola coverage several months ago as the number of cases—and deaths—in West Africa continued climbing and concern about diagnoses in the United States emerged. Our daily news roundups frequently link to critical announcements from [...]
    NewPublicHealth began its 2014 Ebola coverage several months ago as the number of cases—and deaths—in West Africa continued climbing and concern about diagnoses in the United States emerged. Our daily news roundups frequently link to critical announcements from the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.
    S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as well as prevention and treatment research news, and provide perspectives we haven’t seen elsewhere such as this week’s interview on the legalities of quarantines.

    We’ve also continued posting stories on other infectious diseases, some of which—although deadly—have taken a back seat to Ebola in the daily U.
    S. news cycle. Our colleagues at Global Health NOW, the global health blog of the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University, recently wrote about the potential for Ebola news overload.
    In the newsletter, editor Brian Simpson shared a note from a reader who noted that “It’s vital to not let Ebola crowd out other equally and more impactful health issues.

    ” Simpson replied that the writer “raises an important issue. Ebola has not made heart disease, AIDS, traffic injuries, gun violence, maternal mortality, schistosomiasis—or any other threat to human health—go away.
    However, dipping into any media stream might make you think so. ” Simpson adds that GHN “have run a slew of news…on Ebola since March 20” and adds that the challenge is reporting on the most important news while still maintaining perspective. ” “It’s a difficult balance, and sometimes we’ll screw up,” he said.
    “But we’ll always strive to keep things in perspective and find the essential news for you. ” We feel the same way at NewPublicHealth. .
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    Fifteen Years of NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory

    This Chandra X-ray Observatory image of the Hydra A galaxy cluster was taken on Oct. 30, 1999, with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) in an observation that lasted about six hours. Hydra A is a galaxy cluster that is [...]
    This Chandra X-ray Observatory image of the Hydra A galaxy cluster was taken on Oct. 30, 1999, with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) in an observation that lasted about six hours. Hydra A is a galaxy cluster that is 840 million light years from Earth. The cluster gets its name from the strong radio source, Hydra A, that originates in a galaxy near the center of the cluster.
    Optical observations show a few hundred galaxies in the cluster. Chandra X-ray observations reveal a large cloud of hot gas that extends throughout the cluster.

    The gas cloud is several million light years across and has a temperature of about 40 million degrees in the outer parts decreasing to about 35 million degrees in the inner region.
    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory was launched into space fifteen years ago aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia. Since its deployment on July 23, 1999, Chandra has helped revolutionize our understanding of the universe through its unrivaled X-ray vision. Chandra, one of NASA's current "Great Observatories," along with the Hubble Space Telescope and Spitzer Space Telescope, is specially designed to detect X-ray emission from hot and energetic regions of the universe.

    Image Credit: NASA/CXC/SAO
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    Birds roosting in large groups less likely to contract West Nile virus

    Bethany Krebs (on ladder) assembling a flight cage
    A University of Illinois study found that when large groups of birds roost together the chances that an individual bird will get bitten by mosquitoes carrying West Nile virus and subsequently contract the disease actually go down. Full story [...]
    A University of Illinois study found that when large groups of birds roost together the chances that an individual bird will get bitten by mosquitoes carrying West Nile virus and subsequently contract the disease actually go down.

    Full story at http: //news. aces. illinois. edu/news/birds-roosting-large-groups-less-likely-contract-west-nile-virusSourceUniversity of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental SciencesThis is an NSF News From the Field item.
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    Taxi GPS data helps researchers study Hurricane Sandy's effect on NYC traffic

    Brian Donovan (l) and Dan Work (r)
    The largest Atlantic hurricane on record, Hurricane Sandy, offered a chance for researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign to try out a new computational method they developed that promises to help municipalities quantify the resilience of their [...]
    The largest Atlantic hurricane on record, Hurricane Sandy, offered a chance for researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign to try out a new computational method they developed that promises to help municipalities quantify the resilience of their transportation systems to extreme events using only GPS data from taxis.

    Full story at http: //engineering. illinois. edu/news/article/9717SourceUniversity of Illinois College of EngineeringThis is an NSF News From the Field item.
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