IRIS Science Cafe #2 - The Mission

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You asked us about the structure of the sun and how it functions. Come learn more about how the center of our solar system really works!.
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Faces of Public Health: Esther Chernak, Drexel University School of Public Health

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The Center for Public Health Readiness and Communication (CPHRC) at the Drexel University School of Public Health in Philadelphia recently re-launched DiversityPreparedness.org, a clearinghouse of resources and an information exchange portal to facilitate communication, [...]
The Center for Public Health Readiness and Communication (CPHRC) at the Drexel University School of Public Health in Philadelphia recently re-launched DiversityPreparedness. org, a clearinghouse of resources and an information exchange portal to facilitate communication, networking and collaboration to improve preparedness, build resilience and eliminate disparities for culturally diverse communities across all phases of an emergency. The site had originally been developed by Dennis Andrulis, now at the Texas Health Institute, and Jonathan Purtle, who co-writes a blog on public health for the Philadelphia Inquirer.

>>Bonus Links: Read a previous NewPublicHealth interview with Dennis Andrulis Read a previous NewPublicHealth interview with Jonathan Purtle NewPublicHealth recently spoke with Esther Chernak, MD, MPH, the head of CPHRC, about the re-launched site and her work in preparedness.

NewPublicHealth: Tell us a little bit about your background and how you came to lead the Center for Public Health Readiness and Communication.

Esther Chernak: I’m an infectious disease physician by training and pretty much have been working in public health since I finished my infectious disease fellowship in 1991 at the University of Pennsylvania. I started working in the Philadelphia Department of Public Health in its city clinic system doing HIV/AIDS care, and then became the Clinical Director of HIV Clinical Programs for the health centers back in the early ’90s when the epidemic was obviously very different. I then moved to working in infectious disease epidemiology as a staff doctor in the acute communicable disease control program and was involved in infectious disease surveillance and outbreak investigations for a number of years. Then in 1999, I took a job with the City Health Department in what was then called bioterrorism preparedness.
That was the time when major cities in the country were just beginning to be funded to do bioterrorism response plans. Groups that were involved in bioterrorism preparedness recognized relatively quickly that despite the fact that we were dealing with planning for novel strains of influenza and pandemic preparedness and SARS and smallpox, we were also dealing with many, many really significant infectious disease outbreaks, and then ultimately non-infectious disease related issues that had huge impacts on public health, such as earthquakes and hurricanes.

Those links helped prepare me for my role at the Center.

NPH: What was the evolution of DiversityPreparedness. org? Chernak: The site wasa project of the Drexel Center for Health and was launched with a grant from the Office of Minority Health within U. S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).
It had a very clear purpose to provide resources related to emergency preparedness for culturally diverse and communities. It very much came out of the work that Dennis Andrulis was doing at the time around health disparities after disasters.

Remember this was in the wake of Katrina, which put a spotlight on the huge cultural and racial disparities that existed after disasters for a variety of reasons.
When I came on board the funding no longer existed. It has been a great resource for many people involved in the work of disaster planning, in particular people interested in social justice, health disparities and community resilience. But we got the feedback that the site was complex and perhaps a bit cumbersome to navigate for the user, and we also found it to be complex and cumbersome to maintain in terms of uploading new resources.
So we worked with Drexel to use some existing platforms to try to make it a little bit more accessible and really refine it based on many comments we received.

Also, as a part of the revised interface, we found that a lot of the work around disaster preparedness today focuses not just on culturally diverse communities, but also other at risk communities or communities that are “at risk for other reasons”—i. e.
they have functional needs, they have access mobility challenges, they’re non-English speakers, they are children, they’re seniors, they have special medical needs. We’ve learned certainly in the disasters in the last several years that those populations have unique considerations, and in the interest of trying to create a kind of one-stop shop place for folks looking for resources, we decided to augment the resources around those populations as well on the website. In the last year as we’ve transferred the site to the Drexel interface, we reviewed every single resource on the old site and either added to it or discarded it.
And we’re still uploading new resources. We chose the second week of April for the re-launch for a number of reasons—because of Minority Health Awareness Month, and we wanted it to coincide with National Public Health Week.

Tuesday of that week was “Don’t Panic: Disaster Preparedness Starts with Community-wide Commitment and Action. ” NPH: Hurricane season starts June 1. What would you like people to know about the site in preparing for hurricane season? Chernak: I think general population messages are incredibly important, but I think we also have to focus on people who rely on electricity and assistive technology or would have other impediments to simply evacuating on their own. We need to make sure that those folks who are really at uniquely high risk for suffering severe consequences from disasters such as hurricanes have plans in place.
Some of the plans might be early notification, which is huge when it comes to hurricanes because there’s time to evacuate, time to have backup plans and time to have generators in place. Making sure that high-risk folks are plugged into early warning systems—whether they’re public or with a network set up by government agencies such as emergency management communication platforms—is critical.

And while we talk a lot about kits and supplies, the patients that I take care of in my own clinic can’t afford those things, but they all have cell phones and they all have social networks and families and friends and neighbors, and I think we need to take responsibility for each other in disasters.
Look at what happened in Sandy. Look at how people fared when they were stranded in high rises and it tended to be spontaneous volunteers from the neighborhood or building superintendents who realized that there were high vulnerable people on the top floors of buildings. We need to come up with community plans to make sure that you check in on the highest risk folks in your community, that somebody checks in on you if you’re high risk.
I think those are actions people need to think about when it comes to disaster preparedness.

NPH: What else is on your list of things to work on to help make those communities more resilient or prepare them better for disasters? Chernak: We have had a majorproject in the last two to three years for the state health department in Pennsylvania focused on integrating community-based medical practices into disaster planning as a part of the state’s efforts to build community preparedness capability. A big part of what we’ve done—which actually reflects my own background both with respect to working at a local public health department for over 20 years, but also in a primary care setting—has been collaborating with the state of Pennsylvania’s American Academy of Pediatrics chapter to work with them to integrate community-based pediatricians into the work of disaster planning to enhance resources for kids in communities in disasters, and we’re continuing to do that work with the state health department. We’re helping to convene a statewide inter-agency working group around child health and disasters. In this last year we extended that project to the rest of the universe of primary care clinicians—community health center clinicians, family medicine physicians and general practice internists—to try to build them into the work of disaster preparedness.
We’ve developed toolkits for medical practices to ensure they have disaster plans. We also work with them to ensure that they know their important role in the lives of their patients, particularly patients with special health care needs such as chronic illness or reliance on assistive technologies, to help promote disaster planning.

So much of planning around special needs populations has focused on enlisting the support of social service and human service agencies, but while they have tremendous resources and reach into communities, there are thousands of people with special health care needs, who have no relationship at all with a social or human service agency.
But my bet is that almost all of those folks have a primary care physician. There’s great work that we think the primary care medical community can do both to work with patients in disasters, as well as to prepare them for disasters and to maintain communications. Our toolkit includes not just an emergency management template plan, but also tools to allow patients to maintain communication with their doctor during disasters using voice messaging and websites and social media.
It also includes really succinct checklists that doctors can use during an office visit o guide their patients with respect to disaster preparedness, particularly their high risk patients with special healthcare needs.

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For shades of white, LED bulbs need added violet

The same set of white tiles as seen under a violet-pumped light emitting diode (LED) top, and under a blue-pumped LED below. (Credit: Penn State/Flickr)
While some LED bulbs can make colors pop, the vast majority may not showcase or differentiate the appearance of white products because all white light is not the same. For years, companies have been adding whiteners to laundry detergent, paints, [...]
While some LED bulbs can make colors pop, the vast majority may not showcase or differentiate the appearance of white products because all white light is not the same. For years, companies have been adding whiteners to laundry detergent, paints, plastics, paper, and fabrics to make whites look “whiter than white,” but now, with a switch away from incandescent and fluorescent lighting, different degrees of whites may all look the same, according to experts in lighting. “Retailers have long been concerned with the color-rendering qualities of their lighting, but less aware how light sources render white,” says Kevin W. Houser, professor of architectural engineering at Penn State.
The same set of white tiles as seen under a violet-pumped light emitting diode (LED) top, and under a blue-pumped LED below.

(Credit: Penn State/Flickr) Not long ago, the only practical choices for home, office or commercial lighting were incandescent or fluorescent bulbs. More recently, compact fluorescent bulbs, which use less energy than incandescent bulbs, became popular, but compact fluorescents are not always accepted by consumers because of poor color rendition, lack of dimability, slow warm-up to full output, and because they contain mercury. The most recent popular entry into home or commercial lighting are light-emitting diode (LED) bulbs, which while currently expensive, are often even more energy-saving than compact fluorescents. Wavelengths Different light sources contain different combinations of the wavelengths of light.
A broad variety of wavelengths will create light that appears white to the human eye, but different mixtures of wavelengths will affect how colors are rendered. When it comes to seeing the color white, the light source is very important because of how product manufacturers make white products appear white using whiteners.

Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of PennsylvaniaBendy nano-sensors detect infrared lightStanford UniversityNonlinear laser light at the nanoscaleRice UniversityVeggies 'on the clock' may be healthierUniversity of Illinois"Cell listeners" shine light on nanoscale functionStanford UniversityHydrogel turns mouse brain transparentYale UniversityThe photon force is with us—and it’s driving our nanomachines Whiteners contain fluorescent materials that glow under violet and ultraviolet light.
Sunlight, fluorescent light, and incandescent light all produce some light in the violet and ultraviolet range. The whiteners used in consumer products work under those conditions, resulting in a bright white perception. However, most current LED bulbs use blue LEDs to excite a phosphor that then glows white, but produces no violet or ultraviolet light.
Sorting whites Houser, working with a Penn State student and researchers from Soraa Inc.

of Fremont, California, asked 39 participants to observe various combinations of light sources and white objects to see how the light source affected perceptions of white. They report their results in a recent issue of Leukos.
The participants completed three tests—selection, forced choice, and sorting—using five different light sources—a blue-pumped LED, filtered halogen lamp, and three violet-pumped LEDs with differing levels of violet emissions. In the sorting experiment, the researchers placed six calibrated whiteness cards of varying whiteness on a table in a booth enclosed on three sides. They asked participants to arrange the cards in order of whiteness under each of the five light sources.
Kevin Houser sorts tiles in a light box in the departments illuminating engineering lab for observation under several light sources.

(Credit: Penn State/Flickr) Under the halogen light and violet-pumped LED lights with 7 and 11 percent violet emission, the order was correct. Two of the cards were flipped under violet-pumped LEDs with only three percent violet emissions. “Under the LED with only blue pumping the phosphors, the order became random,” says Houser. “People simply couldn’t tell the difference between the cards, which is notable because blue-pumped LEDs are by far the most common type for general lighting.
” In the forced choice test, two nominally identical cards were placed in each of two booths containing different light sources. Participants were asked to choose the card that was whiter under all of the permutations of each of the five light sources.

“The light sources with higher violet component permitted the best discrimination between the targets,” says Houser.
In the selection test, researchers asked the participants to look at a reference card in one booth and rank the cards in a second booth as either as white or whiter than the reference card. Again the blue-pumped LEDs did not fare well. The researchers note that “engineering of an LED source’s spectrum is necessary for an accurate rendering of whiteness.
” Soraa Inc.

funded this study.

Source: Penn State The post For shades of white, LED bulbs need added violet appeared first on Futurity.
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Honey bees in East Africa are winning the mite war

A nymph of Varroa destructor, a mite parasiting the domestic bee (Apis mellifica). (Credit: Gilles San Martin/Flickr)
Parasites and pathogens that devastate honey bees in Europe, Asia, and the United States are spreading across East Africa, but don’t appear to be depleting native honey bee populations yet, researchers say. The invasive pests include including Nosema microsporidia and [...]
Parasites and pathogens that devastate honey bees in Europe, Asia, and the United States are spreading across East Africa, but don’t appear to be depleting native honey bee populations yet, researchers say. The invasive pests include including Nosema microsporidia and Varroa mites. “Our East African honey bees appear to be resilient to these invasive pests, which suggests to us that the chemicals used to control pests in Europe, Asia, and the United States currently are not necessary in East Africa,” says Elliud Muli, senior lecturer in the biological sciences department at South Eastern Kenya University, and a researcher at the International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology in Kenya. A nymph of Varroa destructor, a mite parasiting the domestic bee (Apis mellifica).

(Credit: Gilles San Martin/Flickr) Researchers first discovered Varroa mites in Kenya in 2009. The new study, published in PLOS ONE,  also provides baseline data for future analyses of possible threats to African honey bee populations. “Kenyan beekeepers believe that bee populations have been experiencing declines in recent years, but our results suggest that the common causes for colony losses in the United States and Europe—parasites, pathogens, and pesticides—do not seem to be affecting Kenyan bees, at least not yet,” says Christina Grozinger, professor of entomology at Penn State and director of the Center for Pollinator Research. “Some of our preliminary data suggest that the loss of habitat and drought impacting flowering plants, from which the bees get all their food, may be the more important factor driving these declines.
” Lions, elephants, and honey bees Not only are flowering plants important for honey bees, but the insects are important for plants as well, says Harland Patch, research scientist in entomology. “Honey bees are pollinators of untold numbers of plants in every ecosystem on the African continent,” Patch says.

“They pollinate many food crops as well as those important for economic development, and their products, like honey and wax, are vital to the livelihood of many families.
People say the greatest animal in Africa is the lion or the elephant, but honey bees are more essential, and their decline would have profound impacts across the continent. ” In 2010, researchers conducted a nationwide survey of 24 locations across Kenya to evaluate the numbers and sizes of honey bee colonies, assess the presence or absence of Varroa and Nosema parasites and viruses, identify and measure pesticide contaminants in hives, and determine the genetic composition of the colonies. “This is the first comprehensive survey of bee health in East Africa, where we have examined diseases, genetics, and the environment to better understand what factors are most important in bee health in this region,” Grozinger says.
‘Killer bees’ Varroa mites are present throughout Kenya, except in the remote north.

In addition, Varroa numbers increase with elevation, suggesting that environmental factors may play a role in honey bee host-parasite interactions. Most importantly, while Varroa infestation dramatically reduces honey bee colony survival in the United States and Europe, in Kenya, its presence alone does not appear to impact colony size.
The scientists found Nosema at three sites along the coast and one interior site. At all of the sites, they found only a small number of pesticides at low concentrations. Of the seven common honey bee viruses in the United States and Europe, the team only identified three species, but, like Varroa, these species were absent from northern Kenya.
The number of viruses present was positively correlated with Varroa levels, but was not related to colony size. “The Africanized bees—the so-called ‘killer bees’—in the Americas seem to be having no problem with Varroa or diseases, so I would not be surprised to find they have some innate genetic tolerance to these pests,” Patch says. “We suspect the seemingly greater tolerance of African bees to these pests over the western bees is a combination of genes and environment.
” Given their findings that African honey bees currently appear to be resilient to the effects of parasites and viruses, the researchers recommend that beekeepers in East Africa maintain healthy bee populations by protecting vital nesting habitat and the native flowering plant diversity that the bees depend on for food. In addition, the researchers suggest that beekeepers use pesticides sparingly.

Parasites and pathogens “This research is important because it confirms the resilience of African bees despite the heavy presence of recently introduced Varroa mites, and it suggests that the approach to manage these pests should not follow the application of pesticides as has been done in the western world,” Muli says.
These newly introduced pests to Africa might have long-term implications for the honey bee populations. “As these new parasites and pathogens become more widespread, as pesticide use increases and as landscape degradation increases due to increased urbanization, farming and climate change, we expect to see the combination of all these factors negatively impact the bees in the future,” Grozinger says. A USDA grant and a Basic Research to Enable Agricultural Development (BREAD) grant from the National Science Foundation supported the research.

Source: Penn State The post Honey bees in East Africa are winning the mite war appeared first on Futurity.
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Wearing a new gadget may make you seem like a leader

Can telecommuting put the brakes on a career?
University of California, Davis

Can telecommuting put the brakes on a career?

  • Peer networking: boys vs. girls
  • "It is commonly thought that a particular virtue of having women and minorities as directors is that they bring an outsider's perspective to boards," James Westphal says. "Ironically, it may very well contribute to the discrimination and career impediment that we have uncovered in this study." (Credit: SCA Svenska Cellulosa.../Flickr)
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    If you’re in business and want to be perceived as a leader, wearing the newest tech tool, such as Google Glass, may help your image. Tech-savvy women benefit most, the research suggests. “Familiarity with and usage of new high-tech products [...]
    If you’re in business and want to be perceived as a leader, wearing the newest tech tool, such as Google Glass, may help your image. Tech-savvy women benefit most, the research suggests. “Familiarity with and usage of new high-tech products appears to be a common manifestation of innovative behavior,” say Steve Hoeffler, associate professor of marketing at Owen Graduate School of Management at Vanderbilt University, and Stacy Wood, professor of marketing at Poole College of Management at North Carolina State College. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of California, DavisCan telecommuting put the brakes on a career?Michigan State UniversityPeer networking: boys vs.
    girlsUniversity of MichiganWhy corporate boards are still ruled by white menUniversity of LeedsKids aren't kind to chubby cartoons Carnegie Mellon University‘Elite’ stereotypes can stymie success in kidsStanford UniversityFirst peek at see-through batteries “Those who are tech savvy are also perceived as authoritative on other subjects and as leaders,” they write in a recent study published in the Journal of Product Innovation Management. For one part of the study, interviews were taped using actors who were categorized by their appearance and other factors.

    “We taped them once where they took down a note using an old-fashioned calendar, then did another one where they whipped out an electronic calendar and did it that way,” Hoeffler says.
    When test subjects viewed the interviews, they overwhelmingly viewed the actors using the electronic calendars as being more authoritative. Another part of the study used resumes that were all similar except for hobbies, which were varied to signal whether the subjects were high tech or not. Again, the high-tech candidates came out ahead.
    Women get tech boost In the trials, women who used technological gadgets benefited more than their male counterparts.

    “This finding runs counter to the backlash effect typically found in impression management research in business settings,” Hoeffler and Wood write. “Female job evaluations typically suffer after engaging in the same self-promoting impression management strategies that benefit their male counterparts.
    ” Actually being able to operate the devices really isn’t all that important, provided you know enough to look reasonably competent, Hoeffler says. “Just possession is 90 percent of the game,” he says. “And there are maybe 10 percent of situations where you have to display the ability to use it.
    ” Source: Vanderbilt University The post Wearing a new gadget may make you seem like a leader appeared first on Futurity.
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  • Lake sediment offers ‘preview’ of future droughts

    Tree-killing hurricanes worsen global warming?
    Tulane University

    Tree-killing hurricanes worsen global warming?

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    Researchers sorting through muddy sediment at the bottom of 10 Pacific Northwest lakes conclude that droughts match natural regional warming for various periods over the past 2,000 years. Scientists took cores from the lake bottoms that penetrated into the lake [...]
    Researchers sorting through muddy sediment at the bottom of 10 Pacific Northwest lakes conclude that droughts match natural regional warming for various periods over the past 2,000 years. Scientists took cores from the lake bottoms that penetrated into the lake mud as much as 30 feet. They measured the sediments that contain limestone for two oxygen isotopes—Oxygen 16 and Oxygen 18. Oxygen 18, the heavier of the two, is known to be present in greater abundance during periods of drought.
    Related Articles On FuturityTulane UniversityTree-killing hurricanes worsen global warming?Brown UniversityClimate spurs 65M years of evolutionUniversity of MelbourneIn US, YouTube political ads get nastyUniversity of California, Santa BarbaraSpeedy evolution may help sea urchins surviveUniversity of WarwickCan high home ownership lead to unemployment?University of California, DavisAdult sparrows like heat but it harms their kids The team argues in a paper published in Geophysical Research Letters that tying long-ago droughts to protracted natural climate change may show us what can be expected as human-caused climate change warms the Earth. “This work contributes to our understanding of how the climate system has worked in the past with the goal of improving our ability to predict future droughts,” says Mark Abbott, professor and chair of University of Pittsburgh’s department of geology and planetary science.

    “And this knowledge should give us a better idea of how often droughts might occur in the future as the climate system changes.
    ” He also notes that the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change recently released its 2014 report, which predicts dire consequences, including drought, as a consequence of rapidly advancing anthropogenic climate change. Additional scientists from Northern Illinois University, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, Penn State, Kent State University, the University of Arkansas, and the US Geological Survey contributed to the study. The National Science Foundation supported the work.

    Source: University of Pittsburgh The post Lake sediment offers ‘preview’ of future droughts appeared first on Futurity.
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  • Public Health News Roundup: April 18

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    CDC: Mixed Progress in Food Safety Efforts A new food safety progress report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows mixed results for the country’s safety efforts. While the [...]
    CDC: Mixed Progress in Food Safety Efforts A new food safety progress report from the U. S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows mixed results for the country’s safety efforts. While the rate of salmonella infections was down approximately 9 percent in 2013 compared to the previous three years, campylobacter infections—often linked to dairy products and chicken—are up 13 percent since 2006-2008.
    The CDC also found that vibrio infections, which are often linked to raw shellfish, were at the highest level since tracking began in 1996. “This year’s data show some recent progress in reducing salmonella rates, and also highlight that our work to reduce the burden of foodborne illness is far from over,” said Robert Tauxe, MD, MPH, deputy director of CDC’s Division of Foodborne, Waterborne and Environmental Diseases.

    “To keep salmonella on the decline, we need to work with the food industry and our federal, state and local partners to implement strong actions to control known risks and to detect foodborne germs lurking in unsuspected foods.
    ” The report’s data comes from the Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet), a group of experts from CDC; ten state health departments; the U. S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS); and the U.
    S.

    Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Read more on food safety.

    FDA: Common Procedure to Remove Uterus, Uterine Fibroids Can Spread Cancer A common procedure to remove the uterus or uterine fibroids can unintentionally spread cancerous tissue—such as uterine sarcomas—according to a new safety communication from the U. S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which is discouraging the use of laparoscopic power morcellation. The procedure divides the uterine tissue into smaller fragments in order to remove them via a small abdominal incision.
    “The FDA’s primary concern as we consider the continued use of these devices is the safety and well-being of patients,” said William Maisel, MD, MPH, deputy director for science and chief scientist at the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health. “There is no reliable way to determine if a uterine fibroid is cancerous prior to removal.

    Patients should know that the FDA is discouraging the use of laparoscopic power morcellation for hysterectomy or myomectomy, and they should discuss the risks and benefits of the available treatment options with their health care professionals.
    ” Read more on cancer. Approximately 12M U. S.
    Outpatients Misdiagnosed Each Year Approximately 12 million U.

    S. adults are misdiagnosed each year in doctors’ office and other outpatient settings, with an estimated half of those mistakes potentially leading to serious harm, according to a new study set to be published in the journal BMJ Quality & Safety.
    The overall total means about one in every 20 patients are misdiagnosed. For the study researchers used data from three studies covering a sample pool of approximately 3,000 medical records. "It's important to outline the fact that this is a problem," said Hardeep Singh, MD, the study's lead author and a patient safety researcher at Baylor College of Medicine and at the Michael E.
    DeBakey VA Medical Center, both in Houston, according to Reuters. "Because of the large number of outpatient visits, this is a huge vulnerability. This is a huge number and we need to do something about it.
    ” Read more on access to care. .

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    20th anniversary of Sakhalin Energy

    Today Sakhalin Energy Investment Company Ltd. (Sakhalin Energy), the operator of the Sakhalin-2 project, celebrates its 20 th anniversary. Sakhalin Energy has been established in 1994 to operate one of the largest oil and gas industry projects – Sakhalin-2. The sheer complexity of the challenges in engineering oil and gas export infrastructure [...]
    Today Sakhalin Energy Investment Company Ltd. (Sakhalin Energy), the operator of the Sakhalin-2 project, celebrates its 20th anniversary. Sakhalin Energy has been established in 1994 to operate one of the largest oil and gas industry projects – Sakhalin-2. The sheer complexity of the challenges in engineering oil and gas export infrastructure from square one in subarctic conditions of Sakhalin, including 800 kilometre-long pipeline and LNG plant, is unprecedented.
    We were able to overcome these challenges with prolific support from Federal and Regional government, Russian and international buyers, lenders, all other stakeholders and in close partnership with the Company’s shareholders.

    Today our shareholders are world known companies: Russian Gazprom (50% + one share), Royal Dutch Shell (27. 5 % minus one share), and two Japanese corporations – Mitsui & Co. , Ltd. (12.
    5%) and Mitsubishi Corporation (10%).   “We are proud to be first to achieve outstanding milestones in Russian and international history of oil and gas export, said Roman Dashkov, Chief Executive Officer of Sakhalin Energy.

    We were the first to start operations under Production Sharing Agreement.
    We were the first to obtain largest project financing in Russia in the amount of USD 6. 7 billion. In 1999, we were the first to start oil export from Molikpaq – our offshore asset; in 2006 we have installed Lunskoye-A – gas export platform.
    In 2009, we have started shipping out liquefied natural gas, the new type of energy source, to Asia Pacific”.

      Thanks to Sakhalin Energy efforts Russia has become one of the key players in promising markets of Asia Pacific. About 4.
    5% of global LNG supply comes from Sakhalin LNG plant. Sakhalin Energy exports LNG to Japan, South Korea, China, India, Thailand, and Taiwan, with Japan and South Korea taking the bulk of the Sakhalin LNG. About 9.
    8% of total Japanese LNG import is coming from Sakhalin. Sakhalin-2 oil is mainly exported to China, Japan, and South Korea. In twenty years of operations Sakhalin Energy has produced and exported over 233 million barrels of oil and over 51 million tons of LNG.
    Also, the project supplied the Russian Party with 3. 3 billion cubic metres of natural gas.

    More than 30 000 specialists from 36 countries were engaged in construction of Sakhalin Energy assets – both Company’s employees and contractors.
    Over the course of the project implementation Russia has received more than USD 7. 5 billion in revenue. The project has become a driver behind upgrade of Sakhalin roads, bridges, sea- and airports, hospitals etc.
    The Company allocated over USD 600 million for infrastructure upgrade.

    Number of environmental and social projects initiated by Sakhalin Energy have received international recognition. Today, the Company’s standards are perceived as leading in area of corporate social responsibility.
    Sakhalin Energy continues to lead the charge toward its primary goal – to be the premier energy source for Asia Pacific. Presently, the Company started the preparation of the FEED documentation for the LNG Train 3.   .
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    Image of the Week: Easter fun with the Game of the Golden Goose

    V0040571 A large goose, with three golden eggs: numbered circles
    We scoured the Wellcome Image collection to bring you a special Easter treat this week. No chocolate eggs, but golden ones instead with the game of the golden goose to keep you and your family entertained. Published in 1848, the [...]
    We scoured the Wellcome Image collection to bring you a special Easter treat this week. No chocolate eggs, but golden ones instead with the game of the golden goose to keep you and your family entertained. Published in 1848, the object of this board game is to get your counter to land exactly on number 63. But beware! There are plenty of traps along the way.
    Dodge prison and death and avoid paying a stake at the ale-house if you want be crowned champion. You can download the full size version of this image and give the game a go.

    It is just one of many thousands of images from Wellcome Images that we’ve released in high-resolution with a CC-BY licence.

    Have fun deciding what the stakes will be – my vote is for chocolate! The rules, as they appear on the board, are as follows: RULES TO BE OBSERVED IN THIS GAME 1st This Game is play’d with a pair of Dice, and any Number of Persons may play at it. 2nd Whatever Number it is that any one throws that person much place his Counter in the white Space.
    - under the same Number. For Example,… Should the Case be 6 and 3, he must place the Counter at 9; if the Case be 6 and 5, he must place it at 11; and, when he throws again, he must add the Number to that where his Counter lies, and so remove accordingly. 3rd he that throws 6 must pay a Stake for his paƒsage over the Bridge, and go to Number 12. 4th He that throws a Goose, must double his Cast forward from his last place.
    5th He that throws 19, where the Ale-house is must pay a Stake & Drink till his turn comes to throw again. 6th He that throws 31, where the Well is must stay there till everyone one has thrown twice, unleƒs somebody else throws the same and the he must return to that person’s place.

    7th He that throws 42, where the Maze is must pay a stake and return back to the Number 29.
    8th He that goeth to 52, where the Prison is, must pay one, and and stay there a Prisoner till somebody relieves him by throwing the same Number. 9th He that goeth to 58, where Death is, must pay one and begin again. 10th He that is overtaken by another much return to his place that overtook him, and both must pay a Stake.
    11th he that overthroweth the Number 63 must return back and begin as at first.

    12th He that throweth the just Number 63 winneth the GAME. .

    - Note that the white spaces have been coloured in on this copy of the game. Filed under: Wellcome Featured Image, Wellcome Images Tagged: board game, Golden goose, Wellcome Image of the week, Wellcome Images .
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    Transforming the utility business while staying ahead of the regulatory curve

    Around the world, shifting regulatory requirements are supporting more innovative energy options (such as distributed generation and time-varying pricing) and mandating operational changes (such as integrating ever more renewables). As utilities expand beyond their traditional business model, how can [...]
    Around the world, shifting regulatory requirements are supporting more innovative energy options (such as distributed generation and time-varying pricing) and mandating operational changes (such as integrating ever more renewables). As utilities expand beyond their traditional business model, how can they plan for an evolving regulatory landscape as well as rapidly evolving energy technology?A session at the Siemens Smart Grid Software Leadership Conference (May 5-7, Orlando, Fla. ) will explore these questions -- and help utilities understand how they can "future proof" their business model in a regulatory context. REGISTER NOW for this conference.
    Chris King, Global Chief Regulatory Officer for Siemens Smart Grid Services, will draw upon decades of experience with hundreds of utilities and U. S.

    and international strategic consulting activities to offer insights and learnings in his session: Responding to Regulation: The Business Case Approach to Utility Business Transformation. What's changing about how regulators can impact utility business models?King: The impact of regulation used to be very predictable when the core utility business model was mostly about selling kilowatt hours and ensuring access and reliability. As long as a utility operated efficiently, it had a positive business case. But these days, regulators are responding to new priorities, especially the need for more renewable resources.
    So they're starting to impose new mandates on utilities. Also, regulators are trying to keep up with new technology, especially for the smart grid and distributed generation.

    For instance, in Spain, hourly electricity pricing is now required for all residential and small business customers.
    And in Germany, some central power plants are being retired early in response to subsidized fast growth in renewable capacity there. How does this change the way utilities make business decisions?King: With regulatory mandates, the business case is not to decide whether to increase renewables, introduce time-varying pricing, etc. -- but how to do these things most cost effectively.
    Part of this is looking at total cost of ownership for software needed to meet new requirements -- as well as the potential new business opportunities that this technology offers.

    It's important to build in flexibility that will accommodate future regulatory shifts, since regulation is increasingly a moving target. What if regulator comes up with a different rule in five years, like adding a demand charge to time-varying pricing? You need to be able to implement that without having to make other major new investments to support such a change.
    More interviews and information about the Siemens Smart Grid Software Leadership Conference.
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    Press Release: Carnegie Mellon Senior Art Students Present Final Exhibition; "Actual Size" Opens May 2 at Miller Gallery on Campus

    Actual Size
    Contacts: Pam Wigley / 412-268-1047 / pwigley@andrew.cmu.edu                 Lauren Goshinski / 412-268-1533 / laurengo@andrew.cmu.edu PITTSBURGH—Fourty-three students graduating with bachelor's degrees in fine art and interdisciplinary art (humanities and art, science and art, and computer science and art) present their [...]
    Contacts: Pam Wigley / 412-268-1047 / pwigley@andrew. cmu. edu                 Lauren Goshinski / 412-268-1533 / laurengo@andrew. cmu.
    eduPITTSBURGH—Fourty-three students graduating with bachelor's degrees in fine art and interdisciplinary art (humanities and art, science and art, and computer science and art) present their final work in "Actual Size" at Carnegie Mellon University's Miller Gallery. The exhibition opens with a reception at the gallery from 6 - 8 p.

    m.
    , Friday, May 2. The exhibition will be on view through May 17, with artist and faculty talks at the gallery from 1 - 4 p. m.
    , Tuesday, May 6.

    Admission is free and open to the public. The student-named exhibition spans video, performance, drawing, printmaking, photography, painting, sculpture, interactive and code-based works and more.

    Exhibiting artists are: Adelaide Agyemang, Marie Barcic, Ashley Baron, Michael Bennett, Andrew Bueno, Lynda Choi, Zechariah Choi, Adelaide Cole, Christina Conway, Melanie Danver, Cristina David, Hank Ehrenfried, Robb Godshaw, Claire Gustavson, Kayla Heglas, Fabienne Hudson, Michael Importico, Sarah Keeling, Danielle Kogan, Keith Lafuente, Lazae Laspina, Alexander Lee, Christina Lee, Justin Lin, Lorena Lopez, Janet Lorenz, Eric Mackie, Alex Mallard, Anna Mohr, Ryan Murray, Anna Nelson, Max Perim, Caroline Record, Lauren Ruoff, Matt Sandler, Anna Shepperson, Stephanie Shulman, Jenny Soracco, Rachel Tadeu, Nathan Trevino, Mitsuko Verdery, Nico Zevallos and Andres Zighelboim. The Bachelor of Fine Arts degree addresses many issues facing the contemporary artist and aims to develop each student's commitment, knowledge and creative skills necessary to work in a rapidly changing global culture.

    The BXA Intercollege Degree Programs, in which students may choose from three degree-granting programs: Bachelor of Humanities and Arts (BHA), Bachelor of Sciences and Arts (BSA), and Bachelor of Computer Science and Arts (BCSA), has been steadily growing during the past several years, and enables students the freedom to individualize their educational experience by focusing on the three primary components of integration, balance and innovation. Those elements and more are on display in the senior artists' work at the Miller Gallery, Carnegie Mellon's award-winning, critically acclaimed contemporary art gallery located in the Purnell Center for the Arts on campus. The gallery is free and open to the public from noon to 6 p. m.
    , Tuesday through Sunday.

    More information on "Actual Size" is available at http: //millergallery. cfa. cmu. edu/exhibitions/seniorart2014.
    ###.
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    Rockwell Collins CEO and President to address RBC Capital Markets’ Aerospace and Defense Investor Day on May 15

    CEDAR RAPIDS, Iowa (April 18, 2014) – Rockwell Collins (NYSE: COL) CEO and President Kelly Ortberg will address RBC Capital Markets’ Aerospace and Defense Investor Day in New York on May 15, 2014, at 10:40 a.m. Eastern Time. A [...]
    CEDAR RAPIDS, Iowa (April 18, 2014) – Rockwell Collins (NYSE: COL) CEO and President Kelly Ortberg will address RBC Capital Markets’ Aerospace and Defense Investor Day in New York on May 15, 2014, at 10:40 a. m. Eastern Time. A live audio webcast and subsequent replay of Ortberg’s comments will be available on the company’s web site at www.
    rockwellcollins. com.

      Listeners of the live transmission are encouraged to go to the Investor Relations section of the web site at least 15 minutes prior to the presentation to download and install any necessary software.
    About Rockwell CollinsRockwell Collins is a pioneer in the development and deployment of innovative communication and aviation electronic solutions for both commercial and government applications. Our expertise in flight deck avionics, cabin electronics, mission communications, simulation and training, and information management is delivered by a global workforce, and a service and support network that crosses more than 150 countries. To find out more, please visit www.
    rockwellcollins.

    com.
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    Cape Canaveral Launch Site Seen From the International Space Station

    NASA astronaut Steve Swanson captured this view of Cape Canaveral, Florida from the International Space Station, sharing it on Instagram on April 14, 2014. At Launch Complex 40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, SpaceX is preparing to launch its Falcon [...]
    NASA astronaut Steve Swanson captured this view of Cape Canaveral, Florida from the International Space Station, sharing it on Instagram on April 14, 2014. At Launch Complex 40, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, SpaceX is preparing to launch its Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon spacecraft, loaded with nearly 5,000 pounds of supplies and experiment hardware, on its third commercial resupply mission to the space station.

    The SpaceX-3 launch is scheduled for Friday, April 18 at 3: 25 p. m. EDT with an instantaneous launch window. The U.
    S. Air Force 45th Weather Squadron predicts a 40 percent chance of favorable conditions at launch time.

    A launch Friday will send Dragon on a course to rendezvous with the station Sunday morning.

    Commander Koichi Wakata and Flight Engineer Rick Mastracchio will capture the space freighter using the Canadarm2 robotic arm at 7: 14 a. m. to set it up for its berthing to the Earth-facing port of the Harmony module.

    The backup launch opportunity for the launch of SpaceX-3 is Saturday, April 19 at 3: 02 p. m.

    > International Space Station on Instagram > SpaceX-3 Launch Blog Image Credit: NASA
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    3M Announces Upcoming Investor Events

    Dateline City: ST. PAUL, Minn. ST. PAUL, Minn.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--3M (NYSE: MMM) today announced the following investor events: Language: English Contact: 3MInvestor Contacts:Matt Ginter, 651-733-8206orBruce Jermeland, 651-733-1807orMedia Contact:Donna Fleming Runyon, 651-736-7646 Ticker Slug: Ticker: MMM Exchange: NYSE read more
    Dateline City: ST. PAUL, Minn. ST. PAUL, Minn.
    --(BUSINESS WIRE)--3M (NYSE: MMM) today announced the following investor events: Language: English Contact: 3MInvestor Contacts:Matt Ginter, 651-733-8206orBruce Jermeland, 651-733-1807orMedia Contact:Donna Fleming Runyon, 651-736-7646 Ticker Slug: Ticker: MMM Exchange: NYSE read more.
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    Lego Robotics competitions @ HP Labs Bristol

    Somersetman1112.jpg
    Contributed by Richard Brown, Senior Research Manager HP Labs Bristol For almost the last 10 years HP Labs Bristol has been hosting around 600 school children from 60-70 schools across the South West of England for the First Lego [...]
    Contributed by Richard Brown, Senior Research Manager HP Labs BristolFor almost the last 10 years HP Labs Bristol has been hosting around 600 school children from 60-70 schools across the South West of England for the First Lego League regional robotics finals. Taking place each year at the end of November, this two-day fun-packed, high-energy event encourages kids to show off their robot building and programming skills and their understanding of technology and the environment. So important is this event to the region that one year a BBC film crew spent an entire afternoon filming for a live midday TV report and its evening news show. Another year a local radio station broadcast some live interviews.
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    Is the universe balanced on a pinhead?

    New precise measurements of the mass of the top quark bring back the question: Is our universe inherently unstable? Scientists have known the mass of the heaviest fundamental particle, the top quark, since 1995. But recent, more precise measurements of [...]
    New precise measurements of the mass of the top quark bring back the question: Is our universe inherently unstable? Scientists have known the mass of the heaviest fundamental particle, the top quark, since 1995.

    But recent, more precise measurements of this mass have revived an old question: Why is it so huge? No one is sure, but it might be a sign that our universe is inherently unstable. Or it might be a sign that some factor we don’t yet understand is keeping us in balance. The top quark’s mass comes from its interaction with the Higgs field—which is responsible for the delicate balance of mass that allows matter to exist in its solid, stable form.
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    Not just old codgers

    During a day of talks at Stanford University, theoretical physicist Leonard Susskind explained “Why I Teach Physics to Old Codgers, and How It Got to Be a YouTube Sensation.” Stanford professor Leonard Susskind has a well-deserved reputation among his colleagues [...]
    During a day of talks at Stanford University, theoretical physicist Leonard Susskind explained “Why I Teach Physics to Old Codgers, and How It Got to Be a YouTube Sensation. ” Stanford professor Leonard Susskind has a well-deserved reputation among his colleagues as one of the most imaginative theorists working in physics today. During his nearly five decades in the field, he’s taken leading roles in the study of quark confinement, technicolor, black hole complementarity, the holographic principle and string theory. Even now, at the age of 73, he’s still in the thick of it, batting around ideas with his colleagues about firewalls, the latest twist on black holes.
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    AES Announces Quarterly Dividend

    ARLINGTON, Va.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Apr. 18, 2014-- The Board of Directors of The AES Corporation (NYSE: AES) declared a quarterly common stock dividend of 5 cents per share payable May 15, 2014, to shareholders of record at the close of business on [...]
    ARLINGTON, Va. --(BUSINESS WIRE)--Apr.

    18, 2014-- The Board of Directors of The AES Corporation (NYSE: AES) declared a quarterly common stock dividend of 5 cents per share payable May 15, 2014, to shareholders of record at the close of business on May 1, 2014.

    Additional information regarding dividends paid by AES, including tax treatment, can be located at: http://investor. aes. com/phoenix. zhtml?c=76149&p=irol-dividends.

    About AES The AES Corporation (NYSE: AES) is a Fortune 200 global power company. We provide affordable, sustainable energy to 21 countries through our diverse portfolio of distribution ….
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    NASA Celebrates Earth Day with Public Events and Online Activities

    This view of Earth comes from NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer aboard the Terra satellite.
    NASA will celebrate the 44th anniversary of Earth Day with a variety of live and online activities April 21-27 to engage the public in the agency's mission to better understand and protect our home planet.
    NASA will celebrate the 44th anniversary of Earth Day with a variety of live and online activities April 21-27 to engage the public in the agency's mission to better understand and protect our home planet. .
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