Urban Life and Mobility - EIT ICT Labs Results Day

On December 18, with our research, industry and academic partners, our start-ups and our students, all engaged into innovation and entrepreneurship, we are delighted to invite you to join, meet and discover who we are and what we do, along [...]
On December 18, with our research, industry and academic partners, our start-ups and our students, all engaged into innovation and entrepreneurship, we are delighted to invite you to join, meet and discover who we are and what we do, along Urban Life & Mobility area. EIT ICT Labs was set up in 2010 by the European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT), as an initiative of the European Union. It is an organisation dedicated to innovation in the field of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT). It is located in 9 countries and 13 cities in Europe, including Paris, Rennes and Sophia Antipolis in France.
At EIT ICT Labs, we strongly believe that Europe is what we do and we are putting all our efforts building up the place that will make the difference. We are also well aware that this is urgent time for doing, so as to recover economic growth, create jobs and improve the quality of life.

On December 18, we will present you some of our results, illustrated through disruptive activities in Urban Life & Mobility, one of our innovation areas.
It does not only deal with Smart Cities, but mostly with Smart Citizens. The emergence of new behaviours is at the origin of new business models, resulting in value creation and renewed city governance. We look forward to meeting you, so as to do even more together.
Stéphane AmargerEIT ICT Labs Paris Node Director Gilles BétisUrban Life & Mobility Action Line Leader EIT ICT Labs See full programme and registration HERE.

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Ames Public Event for Orion’s First Test Flight

Join us for the next step in NASA's journey to Mars and beyond! Ames is hosting a launch and splashdown event for Orion's first flight on Dec. 4, 2014 from 1 a.m. to noon.
Join us for the next step in NASA's journey to Mars and beyond! Ames is hosting a launch and splashdown event for Orion's first flight on Dec. 4, 2014 from 1 a. m. to noon.
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CeNS Publication Award Winners 2014!

On Friday, November 28th, the winners of this year's CeNS Publication Awards were announced to the CeNS members during a festive event. Ten awards were presented in the categories "Best Interdisciplinary Publication", "Scientific Breakthrough" and "Best Junior Scientist Publication". With [...]
On Friday, November 28th, the winners of this year's CeNS Publication Awards were announced to the CeNS members during a festive event. Ten awards were presented in the categories "Best Interdisciplinary Publication", "Scientific Breakthrough" and "Best Junior Scientist Publication". With this award, remarkably successful cooperation projects within CeNS as well as outstanding research of an individual research group of CeNS were distinguished. Each year, CeNS awards prizes for excellent publications of CeNS members which have been published during the past 12 months.
This year, the candidates submitted numerous articles which appeared in high-impact journals between October 2013 and October 2014. List of Publication Award Winners 2014.

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Two Berkeley Lab Scientists Named AAAS Fellows

William "Bill" Collins
Two scientists from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have been named Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) for 2014.  William Collins, a climate scientist with Berkeley Lab’s  Earth Sciences Division, and Heinz Frei, [...]
Two scientists from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have been named Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) for 2014.  William Collins, a climate scientist with Berkeley Lab’s  Earth Sciences Division, and Heinz Frei, a chemist with Berkeley Lab’s Physical Biosciences Division, were among the 401 AAAS members awarded the distinction of Fellow this year. The honor, a tradition that began in 1874, recognizes distinguished efforts in the scientific and social applications of science for which the recipients are nominated and elected by their AAAS peers. William “Bill” Collins Collins was recognized as a AAAS Fellow for “distinguished contributions to the field of climate science through fundamental research on interactions among sunlight, heat, the coupled climate system, and global environmental change.
” He heads the Earth Sciences Division’s Climate Sciences Department for Berkeley Lab and also serves as the chief scientist for the Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy (ACME) project, a joint effort between the U. S.

Department of Energy and the National Center for Atmospheric Research to accelerate the development and application of fully coupled, state-of-the-science Earth system models for scientific and energy applications.
The plan is to exploit advanced software and new High Performance Computing machines as they become available to address the most challenging and demanding climate change issues. Heinz Frei Frei was recognized as a AAAS Fellow for “distinguished contributions to the understanding of photochemical reactions, and, in particular, for the advancement of robust catalysts for solar energy conversion. ” He has long been at the forefront of the research effort to develop “artificial photosynthesis,” an emulation of the natural process by which plants capture energy from the sun and convert it into electrochemical energy.
A key to realizing commercial-scale artificial photosynthesis technology is the development of electrocatalysts that can efficiently and economically carry out water oxidation, which is Frei’s field of expertise.

The 2014 AAAS Fellows will be presented with certificates and pins on Saturday, 14 February from 8: 00 a. m.

to 10: 00 a. m. at the AAAS Fellows Forum during the 2015 AAAS Annual Meeting in San Jose, Calif. Additonal Information For more about the research of William Collins go here For more about the research of Heinz Frei go here ### Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory addresses the world’s most urgent scientific challenges by advancing sustainable energy, protecting human health, creating new materials, and revealing the origin and fate of the universe.
Founded in 1931, Berkeley Lab’s scientific expertise has been recognized with 13 Nobel prizes. The University of California manages Berkeley Lab for the U.

S.
Department of Energy’s Office of Science. For more, visit www. lbl.
gov.

The American Association for the Advancement of Science is the world’s largest general scientific society and is the publisher of the journal Science, the largest paid-circulation, peer-reviewed general science journal in the world. Founded in 1848, AAAS includes 261 affiliated societies and academies of science, whose mission is to “advance science and serve society” through initiatives in science policy, international programs, science education, and other areas.
For more, visit www. aaas. org.
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Hidden canyon near Himalayas is a game changer

Tibetans_boat_525
New York University

High altitude may create barrier to ethnic diversity

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  • Humans flip Texas river's native carbon cycle
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  • "Wild birds, such as dippers, are very important indicators of environmental well-being and food-web contamination, and we need to know if populations, other species—or even people—are also at risk," says Steve Ormerod. (Credit: "Dipper" via Shutterstock)
    An ancient canyon buried along the Yarlung Tsangpo River in south Tibet could change current thinking about how picturesque gorges of the Himalayas became so steep, so fast. The canyon is thousands of feet deep in places. “I was extremely [...]
    An ancient canyon buried along the Yarlung Tsangpo River in south Tibet could change current thinking about how picturesque gorges of the Himalayas became so steep, so fast. The canyon is thousands of feet deep in places. “I was extremely surprised when my colleagues, Jing Liu-Zeng and Dirk Scherler, showed me the evidence for this canyon in southern Tibet,” says Jean-Philippe Avouac, a geology professor at Caltech. “When I first saw the data, I said, ‘Wow!’ It was amazing to see that the river once cut quite deeply into the Tibetan Plateau because it does not today.
    That was a big discovery, in my opinion. ” Geologists like Avouac and his colleagues, who are interested in tectonics—the study of the Earth’s surface and the way it changes—can use tools such as GPS and seismology to study crustal deformation that is taking place today.

    But if they are interested in studying changes that occurred millions of years ago, such tools are not useful because the activity has already happened.
    In those cases, rivers become a main source of information because they leave behind geomorphic signatures that geologists can interrogate to learn about the way those rivers once interacted with the land—helping them to pin down when the land changed and by how much, for example. “In tectonics, we are always trying to use rivers to say something about uplift,” Avouac says. “In this case, we used a paleocanyon that was carved by a river.
    It’s a nice example where by recovering the geometry of the bottom of the canyon, we were able to say how much the range has moved up and when it started moving.

    ” The team reports its findings in the current issue of Science. How they made the discovery Last year, civil engineers from the China Earthquake Administration collected cores by drilling into the valley floor at five locations along the Yarlung Tsangpo River.
    Shortly after, former Caltech graduate student Jing Liu-Zeng, who now works for that administration, returned to Caltech as a visiting associate and shared the core data with Avouac and Dirk Scherler, then a postdoc in Avouac’s group. Related Articles On FuturityNew York UniversityHigh altitude may create barrier to ethnic diversityUniversity of California, DavisSalmon can't handle heat in streamsInterspecies mating in fish exposed to BPARice UniversityHumans flip Texas river's native carbon cycle Texas A&M UniversityArctic rivers as climate change forecastersCardiff UniversityHormone shift in river bird linked to pollutants Scherler had previously worked in the far western Himalayas, where the Indus River has cut deeply into the Tibetan Plateau, and immediately recognized that the new data suggested the presence of a paleocanyon. Liu-Zeng and Scherler analyzed the core data and found that at several locations there were sedimentary conglomerates, rounded gravel and larger rocks cemented together, that are associated with flowing rivers, until a depth of 800 meters (2,625 feet) or so, at which point the record clearly indicated bedrock.
    This suggested that the river once carved deeply into the plateau. To establish when the river switched from incising bedrock to depositing sediments, they measured two isotopes, beryllium-10 and aluminum-26, in the lowest sediment layer. The isotopes are produced when rocks and sediment are exposed to cosmic rays at the surface and decay at different rates once buried, and so allowed the geologists to determine that the paleocanyon started to fill with sediment about 2.
    5 million years ago. Where mountains meet river The researchers’ reconstruction of the former valley floor showed that the slope of the river once increased gradually from the Gangetic Plain to the Tibetan Plateau, with no sudden changes, or knickpoints.

    Today, the river, like most others in the area, has a steep knickpoint where it meets the Himalayas, at a place known as the Namche Barwa massif.
    There, the uplift of the mountains is extremely rapid (on the order of 1 centimeter per year, whereas in other areas 5 millimeters per year is more typical) and the river drops by 2 kilometers (1. 24 miles) in elevation as it flows through the famous Tsangpo Gorge, known by some as the Yarlung Tsangpo Grand Canyon because it is so deep and long. Combining the depth and age of the paleocanyon with the geometry of the valley, the geologists surmised that the river existed in this location prior to about 3 million years ago, but at that time, it was not affected by the Himalayas.
    However, as the Indian and Eurasian plates continued to collide and the mountain range pushed northward, it began impinging on the river.

    Suddenly, about 2. 5 million years ago, a rapidly uplifting section of the mountain range got in the river’s way, damming it, and the canyon subsequently filled with sediment.
    “This is the time when the Namche Barwa massif started to rise, and the gorge developed,” says Scherler, one of two lead authors on the paper and now at the GFZ German Research Center for Geosciences in Potsdam, Germany. A whole new hypothesis That picture of the river and the Tibetan Plateau, which involves the river incising deeply into the plateau millions of years ago, differs quite a bit from the typically accepted geologic vision. Typically, geologists believe that when rivers start to incise into a plateau, they eat at the edges, slowly making their way into the plateau over time.
    However, the rivers flowing across the Himalayas all have strong knickpoints and have not incised much at all into the Tibetan Plateau. Therefore, the thought has been that the rapid uplift of the Himalayas has pushed the rivers back, effectively pinning them, so that they have not been able to make their way into the plateau. But that explanation does not work with the newly discovered paleocanyon.
    The team’s new hypothesis also rules out a model that has been around for about 15 years, called tectonic aneurysm, which suggests that the rapid uplift seen at the Namche Barwa massif was triggered by intense river incision. In tectonic aneurysm, a river cuts down through the earth’s crust so fast that it causes the crust to heat up, making a nearby mountain range weaker and facilitating uplift.

    The model is popular among geologists, and indeed Avouac himself published a modeling paper in 1996 that showed the viability of the mechanism.
    “But now we have discovered that the river was able to cut into the plateau way before the uplift happened,” Avouac says, “and this shows that the tectonic aneurysm model was actually not at work here. The rapid uplift is not a response to river incision. ” The other lead author on the paper is Ping Wang of the State Key Laboratory of Earthquake Dynamics, in Beijing, China.
    Additional authors include Jürgen Mey, of the University of Potsdam, in Germany; and Yunda Zhang and Dingguo Shi of the Chengdu Engineering Corporation, in China.

    The National Natural Science Foundation of China, the State Key Laboratory for Earthquake Dynamics, and the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation supported the work.

    Source: Caltech The post Hidden canyon near Himalayas is a game changer appeared first on Futurity.
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  • ‘Weird’ microbes could hold key to drug-resistance

    BW_DNA_525
    Brown University

    Genetic snippets may reveal protein code

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  • Probiotics prime immune system to fight
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  • “We found that in wasps, which are primitively social insects, aggression genes control the establishment of an individual’s dominance over a group,” says Christina Grozinger. (Credit: Sam Droege/USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab/Flickr)
  • "Here we observed changes in the microbiome, which, in future larger studies, may be confirmed as a potential biomarker of oral cancers or pre‑cancers, and may even have utility to discriminate patients with lymph node metastases," says Donna Albertson. "In addition, there are other challenges in clinical management of oral cancers that would benefit from better diagnostic tools." (Credit: Francisca Ulloa/Flickr)
    One of the most mysterious forms of life, Archaea, could be a rich and untapped source of antibacterial drugs. The family of single-celled organisms thrives in environments like boiling hydrothermal pools and smoking deep-sea vents, which are too extreme for [...]
    One of the most mysterious forms of life, Archaea, could be a rich and untapped source of antibacterial drugs. The family of single-celled organisms thrives in environments like boiling hydrothermal pools and smoking deep-sea vents, which are too extreme for most other species. “It is the first discovery of a functional antibacterial gene in Archaea,” says Seth Bordenstein, the associate professor of biological sciences at Vanderbilt University who directed the study. “You can’t overstate the significance of the antibiotic resistance problem that humanity is facing.
    This discovery should help energize the pursuit for new antibiotics in this underexplored group of life. ” Jumping around the ‘tree of life’ Until the late 1970s, biologists thought that Archaea were just weird bacteria, but then a landmark analysis of their DNA showed that they represent an independent branch on the tree of life that stretches back more than three billion years.

    The realization that Archaea could be a source of novel pharmaceuticals emerges from a study of widespread horizontal gene transfer between different species conducted by a team of scientists from Vanderbilt University and Portland State University in Oregon.
    The researchers were investigating a gene that produces a type of enzyme found in tears, saliva, milk, and mucus called a lysozyme. This particular lysozyme possesses broad-spectrum antibacterial action and remarkably jumped from bacteria to all major branches of life.

    They discovered it in an extremely unlikely source: an Archaea microorganism that inhabits deep sea areas surrounding jets of superheated mineral water spewing from hydrothermal vents. The paper that describes this discovery will appear online in eLife on November 25. Archaea interact “We found that this Archaea lysozyme kills certain species of firmicutes bacteria, a large group of bacteria that contains the classic drug resistant bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus anthracis, which causes anthrax, and the gut infection Clostridium difficule,” says Bordenstein. Before now scientists had largely ignored Archaea as a source of drugs because they don’t cause any diseases in humans and experts thought they didn’t interact much with the other forms of life because they were limited to extreme environments.
    Related Articles On FuturityBrown UniversityGenetic snippets may reveal protein codePrinceton UniversityWonder drug’s sticky secret weaponUniversity of PennsylvaniaProbiotics prime immune system to fightUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillGene target could beat all MRSA strainsIowa State UniversityAncient 'mean genes' still linked to aggressionNew York UniversityBacteria in your mouth could be oral cancer clues In recent years, however, investigators have found that significant numbers of bacteria co-exist with Archaea in extreme environments and that Archaea themselves are not limited to such environments but also live in milder environments, such as within marine algae and in mammalian guts. “The fact that Archaea are interacting with other forms of life a lot more than we thought means that they are competing for resources,” says coauthor Jason Metcalf, who is pursuing an MD/PhD at Vanderbilt.

    “And, if they are competing for resources, then they are creating chemicals to attack and defend against other organisms: compounds that could be effective against bacteria resistant to our current antibiotics. ” Where this gene shows up The scientists first encountered this antibacterial gene, a GH25-muramidase, in a bacteriophage virus that attacks Wolbachia, a bacterial parasite that infects insects and other invertebrates worldwide. It is a member of a family of enzymes that are common in bacteria, which use them to remodel their cell walls. Bacteriophages use the same enzymes to invade bacteria by chewing holes in their cell walls.
    In addition, the gene’s presence in an insect, the pea aphid, had previously been reported. But when they examined its evolutionary history, the researchers were surprised to find that the gene also popped up in an ancient lineage of plants (Selaginella moellendorffii) and many species of fungi including Aspergillus oryzae, a mold used in Asian cooking to make soy sauce, miso, and alcoholic beverages like sake.

    “That was completely unexpected,” says Metcalf.
    “But the weirdest occurrence was in an Archaea species Aciduliprofundum boonei that lives in hydrothermal vent communities. Why in the world would it need such an enzyme?” Stealing genes In order to explore this question, Metcalf tracked down one of the few groups of scientists in the world who specialize in collecting and growing Archaea species, including A.

    boonei: the Reysenbach Lab at Portland State. With their aid, he was able to purify A. boonei‘s GH25-muramidase domain, a step that was needed to determine the enzyme’s function. “What is really cool about these results for me comes from an ecological perspective,” says Reysenbach.
    “These Archaea live in close proximity, in biofilms, to extremophile bacteria and need to compete for resources. I have often wondered, ‘How do Archaea do it?’ “Through this paper, we show that the smart archaeal ‘bugs’ do so by stealing genes from their bacterial ‘mates’ and competitors.

    This points to Archaea being good, as yet relatively untapped targets for exploring new antibacterial drugs.
    ” Metcalf also spent more than two years trying to purify the enzymes from the gene-carrying plant and fungi without success. “That is not unusual. It can be very difficult to purify large antibacterial proteins,” says Bordenstein.
    “This was a very difficult, multifaceted project.

    Only someone with Jason’s abilities could have pulled it off. ” Study authors are Metcalf, doctoral student Lisa Funkhouser-Jones, and Bordenstein from Vanderbilt, and postdoctoral student Kristen Brileya and Professor Anna-Louise Reysenbach from Portland State University in Oregon.
    The research was funded by grants from the National Institutes of Health, and from the National Science Foundation. The university has applied for a patent on the newly discovered gene and is exploring industry partnerships and licensing opportunities.

    Source: Vanderbilt University The post ‘Weird’ microbes could hold key to drug-resistance appeared first on Futurity.
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  • Wellcome Trust Research Round-up: 24.11.14

    B0004685 DNA
    Our fortnightly round-up of research news from the Wellcome Trust community… Discovery of gene variant leading to natural typhoid resistance People who carry a particular gene have natural resistance against typhoid, according to a new study that examined the [...]
    Our fortnightly round-up of research news from the Wellcome Trust community… Discovery of gene variant leading to natural typhoid resistance People who carry a particular gene have natural resistance against typhoid, according to a new study that examined the genetic material of hundreds of people in Vietnam and Nepal. The study, published in Nature Genetics, involved screening the human genome to look for genes associated with susceptibility to, or resistance from, typhoid. Also known as enteric fever, typhoid affects more than 25 million people annually.

    According to lead researcher Dr Sarah Dunstan, from the Oxford University Clinical Research Units in Vietnam and Nepal, a Wellcome Trust Major Overseas Programme, said: “We found that carrying a particular form of the HLA-DRB1 gene provides natural resistance against typhoid fever. This gene codes for a receptor that is important in the immune response, by recognising proteins from invading bacteria. ” The study’s findings are important because the gene that gives rise to protection against typhoid is one of the most widespread instances of natural resistance to an infectious disease. Other examples of genetic variation that leads to natural immunity include the gene for sickle cell that protects carriers from malaria, and the CCR5 and HLA genes that provide protection from HIV AIDS.
    New frontiers in paediatric pain The research of Wellcome Trust Career Development Fellow Dr Rebeccah Slater, who studies paediatric and infant pain, is explored in a film produced by the University of Oxford. Dr Slater’s most recent paper investigated how the new-born brain is activated by sensory stimulation of the skin.

    This was a pilot study of a small group of infants, testing the feasibility of using fMRI studies to look at how infant brains react to mechanical stimulation of their skin.
    Initial results showed distinct patterns of brain activation in response to varying intensities and types of stimulation, indicating potential for future studies to explore this further. Understanding the infant sensory experience and pain is key to developing ethical treatments and providing effective pain relief for the very young. For example, Dr Slater’s previous work has challenged a common practice of doctors giving sugar as pain relief to new-borns, for example during heel-prick blood sampling.
    International E.

    Coli study raises hope for vaccine Wellcome Trust supported researchers have conducted the largest ever study of the bacterium enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, providing hope that a single global vaccine can be developed. This bacterium causes 400,000 deaths and 400 million cases of diarrhoea each year in low-and-middle-income countries as well as affecting many travellers to these regions.
    The study, published in Nature Genetics, looked at 362 different strains of E. Coli from 20 countries and found that strains clustered into closely related groups. The bacteria sampled from Asia, Africa and Latin America were more closely related than previously thought, with some strains of E.
    coli found to have spread from a single source. The discovery of large genetic similarities in the strains add support to the idea that one vaccine may effective for treating patients around the world. “This research strengthens our belief that it is possible to target a broad range of enterotoxigenic E.
    coli groups with one vaccine,” says Professor Gordon Dougan, senior author from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute. “By targeting the most prevalent colonisation factors in these lineages, we stand a chance of developing a vaccine that will reduce the disease burden caused by this bacterium.

    This work is now underway at the Sanger Institute.
    ” In other news… Genomics England has opened applications for clinicians and researchers to join a new Clinical Interpretation Partnership, working with data from the 100,000 Genomes Project. The Wellcome Trust provided £27m funding for a sequencing hub that will house the project, which aims to sequence 100,000 genomes from NHS patients by 2017. Dame Kay Davies, Wellcome Trust Deputy Chair, has been awarded a WISE Lifetime Achievement Award for her career researching Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and championing women in science.

    The Mental health research charity MQ: Transforming Mental Health has announced £1. 5 million in funding awards to support innovative ways of providing more effective and accessible psychological treatments for conditions such as anxiety, depression and ADHD.

    Image credit: DNA sequencing - Neil Leslie, Wellcome Images ,E.

    Coli -  David Gregory&Debbie Marshall, Wellcome ImagesFiled under: Funding, Genetics and Genomics, Infectious Disease, Wellcome Trust Research Round-up Tagged: WRR
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    New Volume Documents the Science at the Legendary Snowmastodon Fossil Site in Colorado

    Summary: Four years ago, a bulldozer operator turned over some bones during construction at Ziegler Reservoir near Snowmass Village, Colorado. Scientists from the Denver Museum of Nature & Science were called to the scene and confirmed the bones were [...]
    Summary: Four years ago, a bulldozer operator turned over some bones during construction at Ziegler Reservoir near Snowmass Village, Colorado.

    Scientists from the Denver Museum of Nature & Science were called to the scene and confirmed the bones were those of a juvenile Columbian mammoth, setting off a frenzy of excavation, scientific analysis, and international media attention Contact Information: Heidi  Koontz ( Phone: 303-202-4763 ); Maura O’Neal ( Phone: 303. 370. 6407 ); Randall Kremer ( Phone: 202-633-2950 ); DENVER — Four years ago, a bulldozer operator turned over some bones during construction at Ziegler Reservoir near Snowmass Village, Colorado. Scientists from the Denver Museum of Nature & Science were called to the scene and confirmed the bones were those of a juvenile Columbian mammoth, setting off a frenzy of excavation, scientific analysis, and international media attention.
    This dramatic and unexpected discovery culminates this month with the publication of the Snowmastodon Project Science Volume in the international journal Quaternary Research.   Fourteen papers by 47 authors from the United States and abroad collectively represent “a new benchmark for understanding climate change in the American West,” said paleontologist Dr.

    Ian Miller, Snowmastodon Project co-leader and chair of the Museum’s Earth Sciences Department.
    Project co-leader and former DMNS chief curator, Dr. Kirk Johnson, and several scientists from the U. S.
    Geological Survey and academic institutions around the world contributed articles to the journal.

      “Nothing beats pulling fossils out of the ground,” said project scientist Dr. Jeff Pigati of the U.
    S. Geological Survey, “but the site also lets us see what the Colorado Rockies were like during a period of time that we simply couldn’t reach before the discovery. ”  The Snowmastodon site was an ancient lake that filled with sediment between 140,000 and 55,000 years ago preserving a series of Ice Age fossil ecosystems.
    Particularly fortuitous is the high-elevation locale, providing first-time documentation of alpine ecosystems during the last interglacial period between about 130,000 and 110,000 years ago. Because scientists were able to collect and study such a wide range of fauna and flora—from tiny specks of pollen to the bones of giant mastodons—the site emerged as a trove of information that Miller said will inspire future research for years to come.   "This project was unprecedented in its size, speed, and depth of collaboration.
    The science volume now moves beyond the pure excitement of the discovery to the presentation of its hard science and its implications for understanding the biological and climate history of the Rocky Mountain region," said Johnson, now the Sant Director of the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History.   Papers in the special edition focus on impacts of climate change, then and now.

    The site’s ecosystems—plants, insects, and animals combined—varied dramatically in response to climate change.
    “In other words, turn the climate dial a little and the ecosystems change considerably. We were also surprised to find that certain periods in the record that seem to be cool elsewhere in North America were quite warm in the central Rockies,” said Miller. ”The implication is that alpine ecosystems respond differently to climate change than other, lower elevation ecosystems.
    These new results have huge implications for predicting present-day climate change in Colorado and beyond.

    ” Usually fossil sites preserve only snapshots in time, which are then pieced together to understand past time periods. By contrast, the Snowmastodon site captures a nearly continuous 85,000-year time span.
    As a result, the site provides the best-known record of life and climate at high elevation anywhere in North America.   During a total of 69 days in 2010 and 2011, the Museum mobilized one of the largest fossil excavation efforts ever, recovering more than 5,000 large bones and 22,000 small bones representing roughly 50 different species. The site is most notable for containing the remains of at least 35 American mastodons, representing both genders as well as a variety of ages, from calves to full-grown adults.
      “We had no idea that the high Rockies were filled with American mastodons during the last interglacial period,” Miller noted.   While the spectacular array of Ice Age animals initially drew scientists to the site, the opportunity to understand the world that they inhabited proved to be a powerful draw as well. “Scientists from around the world donated countless hours and resources toward the project,” said Pigati.
    “For so many of them to come together and reconstruct a world that no longer exists in such incredible detail, well that’s just a dream come true. ”  About the Denver Museum of Nature & Science The Denver Museum of Nature & Science is the Rocky Mountain Region’s leading resource for informal science education.

    Our mission is to be a catalyst and ignite the community’s passion for nature and science.
    The Museum envisions an empowered community that loves, understands, and protects our natural world. As such, a variety of engaging exhibits, discussions, and activities help Museum visitors celebrate and understand the wonders of Colorado, Earth, and the universe. The Museum is located at 2001 Colorado Blvd.
    , Denver, CO, 80205.

    To learn more about the Museum, visit dmns. org or call 303-370-6000.
    Many of the Museum’s educational programs and exhibits are made possible in part by the citizens of the seven-county metro area through the Scientific & Cultural Facilities District. Connect with the Museum on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.   Additional Information Snowmass Fossil Site Provides Opportunity to Study Past Vegetation and Climate in Colorado Fossil Discovery Makes History: Studying a Prehistoric Climate and Ecosystem in Colorado .
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    SPS IPC Drives 2014: Our highlights

    It’s almost that time again: SPS IPC Drives 2014 opens its doors in Nuremberg on November 25. Siemens will present its comprehensive portfolio of drive and automation systems in Hall 11 under the motto “Making Things Right.” What can visitors [...]
    It’s almost that time again: SPS IPC Drives 2014 opens its doors in Nuremberg on November 25. Siemens will present its comprehensive portfolio of drive and automation systems in Hall 11 under the motto “Making Things Right. ” What can visitors expect to see at the trade show this year? Here are the highlights: IE4 motors for Simotics GP and Simotics SD When it comes to energy efficiency, Siemens is taking another step into the future by offering Simotics asynchronous low-voltage motors on the highest defined motor efficiency class, effective immediately. The IE4 motors in the Simotics GP and Simotics SD series are 14 percent more efficient than the IE1 motors and also feature lower losses.
    This helps save energy and lower operating costs.   Sinamics G120 converters are now in round two With its second-generation Sinamics G120, Siemens presents a space-saving modular converter that offers greater power density.

    The higher power density is made possible by the new PM240-2 power module.

    The updated converter series is available in three voltage variants: 200V, 400V, and 690V. The equipment of the second generation is even more robust toward grid fluctuations, among others through an integrated intermediate reactor. Siemens offers seven sizes, with outputs between 0. 37 kW and 250 kW, based on the requirements.
      Expanded range of automation controllers Siemens has developed a whole range of new automation controllers. The focus is on an expanded Safety Integrated portfolio with failsafe CPUs for all Simatic S7-1500 advanced controllers and also, for the first time, for Simatic S7-1200 basic controllers and Simatic ET 200SP distributed controllers.

    New additions to the product range are a software controller based on the Simatic S7-1500 for PC-based automation as well as the compact open controller with a PC-based software controller, visualization, and central I/Os in a single device for the distributed controllers.
      Trust is good, control is better The new range of services for Control Performance Analytics expands the Plant Data Services and establishes greater transparency and efficiency in plants within the process industry. The data-based service provides a continuous analysis of process and status data of the control circuits that control the production processes. Siemens experts collect and evaluate process data with the aid of a data collector, complying with the strictest security standards.
    These evaluations help customers initiate and support targeted measures, if necessary, when implementing optimization measures.

      Sirius system module S2: more power in an optimized size The switching, safety, and monitoring devices are now available in the innovative S2 size, which has a flexible and modular design. S2 has a compact width of only 55 mm and an output of up to 37kW as well as 80A of current.
    The new devices thus take up very little room in the switchgear cabinet when space is at a premium, thereby meeting the requirements of today’s manufacturers of plants and machinery.   Modeling and simulation: Tecnomatix Issues such as efficiency must be considered as early as during the plant planning stage. Tecnomatix Plant Simulation offers a comprehensive portfolio of digital manufacturing solutions, which make it possible to model and simulate production systems and their processes.
    Material flow, use of resources, and logistics can thus be optimized for all stages of plant planning. The software can be used for global production facilities, local factories, and even individual production lines. The new version 12 offers customers many advantages, such as a 20 percent increase in the productivity of existing systems and the ability to reduce inventory by as much as 60 percent.
    New generation of UHF readers Siemens is launching a new generation of RFID readers for the ultra-high frequency radio range. The three new devices in different function and performance classes enable users to implement RFID projects faster and more easily and reduce plant downtimes.

    Due to their high protection class (IP65) and integrated Profinet connection, Simatic RF680R and RF685R devices are designed for use in the production environment, for example in multi-variant manufacturing.
      Integrated power supply in networked automation applications With the new Sitop PSU8600, Siemens presents the next generation of power supply systems. It is the first power supply to be fully integrated into networked automation applications and the TIA Portal, thereby reducing engineering and operating costs. Depending on the requirements, additional modules can be easily added, for example for backup during short-term power outages.
    Integrated functions support condition monitoring and energy data acquisition and thereby increase availability and efficiency.

      Here you can read all articles concerning the SPS IPC Drives 2014! What is your highlight on this year's SPS?.
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    Bee brain hints at how we make memories

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    Michigan State University

    Brain learns while body snoozes

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    Researchers studying honey bees have found that genes switch off as memories are being formed, allowing for new connections between nerve cells. Memory management in the bee brain is controlled by small genetic elements called microRNAs that help regulate gene [...]
    Researchers studying honey bees have found that genes switch off as memories are being formed, allowing for new connections between nerve cells. Memory management in the bee brain is controlled by small genetic elements called microRNAs that help regulate gene expression. These microRNAs could directly target the key developmental gene “actin,” which controls the ability of nerve cells to connect with other nerve cells. “We believe the brain selectively controls the wiring of memory through microRNAs that switch off key genes that shape, connect, and signal between neurons,” says Charles Claudianos, who co-led the study and is a professor at the University of Queensland Brain Institute (QBI).
    “The brain is constantly managing all of the sensory experiences we receive at any one time, and retains some of these as memories based on the relative importance or significance of the experience, such as food, danger, and sex, to name some examples. “We are now gaining an insight into how this occurs.

    ” Autism and dementia Claudianos says the findings could eventually suggest new ways to address disorders such as dementia and autism.

    Related Articles On FuturityMichigan State UniversityBrain learns while body snoozesJohns Hopkins UniversityMosquito carries, kills malaria parasiteUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillHow anxiety and reward interact in the brainJohns Hopkins UniversityNeuron insulators play surprising role in ALSUniversity of California, DavisAutism: High risk for younger siblingsUniversity of Southern CaliforniaCommon gene raises cancer risk from red meat “The current hypothesis in autism is that those brains are over-connected, so getting a grasp of understanding how to regulate neural circuitry could provide future methods of tackling these problems,” says Claudianos. “The nervous system behind memory formation is fundamentally no different between a honey bee and a human, so by studying bees we identify the basic biological processes that help us understand humans. ” Judith Reinhard, who co-led the study and is also a researcher at QBI, says the research provides a fundamental understanding of how neural circuits are built and consolidated to retain memories. “Memory is a fundamental component of many mental health disorders, so understanding the basic science behind memories will give us greater insight into many disorders,” she adds.
    “Human illnesses and diseases such as muscular myopathies, neurodevelopmental disorders, and susceptibility to infection are caused by DNA mutations that affect actin and actin-related biological processes. “Molecules such as microRNAs are thought to have evolved to shape biological processes through controlling the expression genes that function in that process.

    A single microRNA can control many genes that function in the nervous system.
    ” The researchers collaborated with teams from Universidade de Sao Paulo and Universidade Federal de Alfenas in Brazil and the University of Konstanz in Germany. Read more about the work in the journal Nature Communications.

    Source: University of Queensland The post Bee brain hints at how we make memories appeared first on Futurity.
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  • Demand response management: Siemens, Wabash Valley Power collaborate on next-generation tools

    Demand response is powerful strategic option that helps utilities enhance grid reliability and control costs. But until recently, including a wide diversity of customers and resources (especially residential) in DR programs has been a challenge, since this required a [...]
    Demand response is powerful strategic option that helps utilities enhance grid reliability and control costs. But until recently, including a wide diversity of customers and resources (especially residential) in DR programs has been a challenge, since this required a considerable amount of manual processes. In the last few years, the Wabash Valley Power Association addressed this challenge by partnering with Siemens to develop and deploy a next-generation demand response management system (DRMS). This system supports a far more streamlined, comprehensive and flexible approach to demand response, while also addressing market and regulatory considerations, yielding significant benefits -- according to a detailed case study by IDC Energy Insights.
    WVPA provides electric generation and transmission services for its 26 cooperative utility members operating in Illinois, Indiana, and Missouri -- serving over 320,000 homes, businesses, farms and industrial sites. Looking ahead to projected requirements for 2020, WVPA would need to either add costly peak generation capacity, or better manage peak demand.

    While demand response was the obvious choice, there was a catch.
    Typically, wholesale power markets are designed to accommodate large energy sources -- in the range of hundreds of megawatts. For decades, WVPA had operated a direct load control DR program (load shedding on water heaters, air conditioning and irrigation pumps), which was inherently limited. Aggregating a cumulatively larger but far more flexible diversity of smaller, scattered loads presented substantial challenges for communication and control.
    But when wholesale power market operators in the region began to allow smaller DR loads to enter the market, WVPA decided to invest in expanding their DR capacity.

    Making flexible residential DR workMeanwhile, Siemens had been developing solutions to manage DR more effectively and efficiently -- including tools to develop and support DR programs, device control software, post-event analytics and reporting, and billing verification. Building upon a longstanding relationship with Siemens (which began with the implementation of EnergyIP, meter data management software a few years earlier), WPVA and Siemens collaboratively developed and deployed what has since become Siemens' benchmark DRMS solution.
    During this process, Siemens calculated a comprehensive set of baseline loads used in market settlements and tariff development. In addition, Siemens supplied finite visibility and control down to the substation level, to ensure that DR events did not impact reliability or quality of service. WPVA's member cooperatives easily accepted the new DR program, which was designed to minimize their risk.
    For instance, WPVA paid for DR equipment installed at both the coops and participating customer premises. This not only lowered costs through volume pricing, but also ensured predictable performance (a key concern in systems integration). Also, WPVA guaranteed that participating coops would be paid for access to their DR resources, whether or not those resources were used.
    This minimized customers' financial risk, making it easier to recruit DR program participants. Implementing the new DR program involved modifying and creating new business processes at WPVA and member coops.

    With the new DRMS, WPVA was now able to automate many previously manual processes.
    (Automation is a key DRMS benefit. )WPVA and Siemens worked closely with member coops to establish a common data model for integrating data from systems and users. This is important, since even seemingly innocuous naming conventions can cause accounting problems.
    The DRMS also provides WPVA and member coops with a rich visual representation of DR resources.

    These can be geofenced, limiting DR impact to areas served by specific feeders, circuits, or substations. This way, DR can be deployed to proactively address transformer overloading and other grid stability problems.
    IDC strongly recommends DRMSComprehensive DRMS invariably involves integrating devices and controllers from many vendors, which can complicate and slow DRMS deployment. The Siemens DRMS complies with the OpenADR standard, as increasingly are many other vendors' devices and software. OpenADR enables DR to be "baked in" to systems and equipment at all levels, streamlining the process of turning signals into action.
    IDC notes that with DRMS technology, WPVA's total DR events have decreased by over 70% -- with no drop in benefits to member coops or participating customers. More broadly, IDC strongly recommends that utilities invest in DRMS and related technologies, since this supports real-time coordination of grid operations while enhancing important service factors such as frequency regulation and voltage stability. "DRMS for the benefit of improved asset management holds tremendous potential, if not a future requirement," writes IDC, "as distribution grid complexity continues to increase with distributed energy resources adoption.
    "Read the full IDC case study of DRMS at WPVALearn more: Siemens DRMSSiemens infographic: How demand response works.
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    Carnegie Mellon Unveils Lunar Rover "Andy"

    Andy Lunar Rover 1
    By Byron Spice /  412-268-9068                        PITTSBURGH—Carnegie Mellon University today unveiled Andy, a four-wheeled robot designed to scramble up steep slopes and survive the temperature swings and high radiation encountered while exploring the moon's pits, caves [...]
    By Byron Spice /  412-268-9068                       PITTSBURGH—Carnegie Mellon University today unveiled Andy, a four-wheeled robot designed to scramble up steep slopes and survive the temperature swings and high radiation encountered while exploring the moon's pits, caves and polar ice. "Every extraterrestrial robot carries some DNA from Carnegie Mellon, but Andy would be the first true CMU robot to make the leap from Earth," said William "Red" Whittaker, professor of robotics and director of the Field Robotics Center. "This is the culmination of lots of work by lots of people and is the next step toward Carnegie Mellon becoming a spacefaring university. " Andy, which derives its moniker from university namesakes Andrew Carnegie and Andrew Mellon, was developed over the last nine months by a largely student workforce and drew on expertise and resources from across the university, including the School of Computer Science, the College of Engineering, the College of Fine Arts and the Mellon College of Science.
    The robot is Carnegie Mellon's contribution to an effort led by Pittsburgh's Astrobotic Technology to land a robot on the moon and win the $20 million-plus Google Lunar XPrize. It also represents a larger ambition.

    "We don't do anything just to win a prize," Whittaker said.
    "If we're on the moon anyway, we're going to do something while we're up there. " One possibility is to use Andy to explore lunar pits.   These are giant, newly discovered, steep-sided holes created by the collapse of underground voids.
    "These pits are astounding and unexplored; it will be like coming upon the Grand Canyon," Whittaker said.

    "Some pits might be entrances to caves.   You can't explore caves from a satellite; you've got to be there, on the ground, so robots are the next big step.
    " Andy's wide stance, low center-of-gravity and high belly clearance combine for unprecedented stability, slope-climbing and straddling of rocks. Whittaker noted that Andy achieves its superb mobility with very wide wheels and light weight. Andy's wheels are a foot in diameter, which is exceptional for a three-foot rover.
      Its weight on the moon will be less than 10 pounds. Jon Anderson, a master's degree student in robotics, led the mobility team. The team's innovations gave Andy the softest footprint and greatest strength-to-weight ratio of any space rover to date.
      The rover has strong pulling power and a novel suspension for transferring that power to the ground. Extraterrestrial robots encounter radiation levels that can burn ordinary electronics.

      Before flight, some of Andy's electronics will be further upgraded with space-certified parts, but the Andy team has already achieved notable reliability and space tolerance using high-reliability terrestrial parts, multiples of some critical components, and innovative software for detecting faults and switching between components as necessary.
    Joe Bartels, a Ph. D. student in robotics, explained that a spare component can take over operations permanently if its twin is fatally damaged, or temporarily if its twin can be recovered by rebooting following a failure.
    Curtis Boirum, a master's degree student in robotics, said Andy also incorporates a new method for combining landing imagery with 3-D path reconstruction data to plan and document its exploration route.

    About 50 students, faculty and staff members contributed long hours to Andy's development, with key team members including: Nate Otten and Heather Jones, both Ph. D. students in robotics; Luke Metro, a sophomore electrical and computer engineering major; John Mann, a junior computer science major; and Jay Jasper, a master's degree student in mechanical engineering. In addition to scientific exploration, Andy will accommodate a number of artistic payloads coordinated by Lowry Burgess, professor of art, and Mark Baskinger, associate professor of design.

    More information about Andy and Carnegie Mellon's Lunar Exploration Initiative is available online at http: //www. cmu. edu/google-lunar-x/. Carnegie Mellon's Robotics Institute has led the development of a number of planetary robotic technologies for NASA, including walking robots for exploring active volcanoes, robots designed for extraterrestrial drilling and advanced wheel development.
    Autonomous driving software originated at Carnegie Mellon is the basis of navigation and safeguarding for NASA's Mars rovers. ### Andy is a four-wheeled robot designed to scramble up steep slopes and survive the temperature swings and high radiation encountered while exploring the moon's pits, caves and polar ice.

    The robot is Carnegie Mellon's contribution to an effort led by Pittsburgh's Astrobotic Technology to land a robot on the moon and win the $20 million-plus Google Lunar XPrize.
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    Creating a spark

    Science has a long history of creativity generated through collaboration between fields. A principle of 18th century mechanics holds that if a physical system is symmetric in some way, then there is a conservation law associated with the symmetry. Mathematician [...]
    Science has a long history of creativity generated through collaboration between fields. A principle of 18th century mechanics holds that if a physical system is symmetric in some way, then there is a conservation law associated with the symmetry. Mathematician Emmy Noether generalized this principle in a proof in 1918. Her theorem, in turn, has provided a very powerful tool in physics, helping to describe the conservation of energy and momentum.
    Science has a long history of creativity generated through this kind of collaboration between fields. In the process of sharing ideas, researchers expose assumptions, discern how to clearly express concepts and discover new connections between them.

    These connections can be the sparks of creativity that generate entirely new ideas.
    In 1895, physicist Wilhelm Roentgen discovered X-rays while studying the effects of sending an electric current through low-pressure gas. Within a year, doctors made the first attempts to use them to treat cancer, first stomach cancer in France and later breast cancer in America. Today, millions of cancer patients’ lives are saved each year with clinical X-ray machines.
    A more recent example of collaboration between fields is the Web, originally developed as a way for high-energy physicists to share data.

    It was itself a product of scientific connection, between hypertext and Internet technologies. In only 20 years, it has transformed information flow, commerce, entertainment and telecommunication infrastructure.
    This connection transformed all of science. Before the Web, learning about progress in other fields meant visiting the library, making a telephone call or traveling to a conference. While such modest impediments never stopped interdisciplinary collaboration, they often served to limit opportunity.
    With the Web have come online journals and powerful tools that allow people to search for and instantly share information with anyone, anywhere, anytime. In less than a generation, a remarkable amount of the recorded history of scientific progress of the last roughly 3600 years has become instantly available to anyone with an Internet connection. Connections provide not only a source of creativity in science but also a way to accelerate science, both by opening up entirely new ways of formulating and testing theory and by providing direct applications of the fruits of basic R&D.
    The former opens new avenues for understanding our world. The latter provides applications of technologies outside their fields of origin.

    Both are vital.
    High-energy physics is actively working with other fields to jointly solve new problems. One example of this is the Accelerator Stewardship Program, which studies ways that particle accelerators can be used in energy and the environment, medicine, industry, national security and discovery science. Making accelerators that meet the cost, size and operating requirements of other applications requires pushing the technology in new directions.
    In the process we learn new ways to solve our own problems and produce benefits that are widely recognized and sought after.

    Other initiatives aim to strengthen intellectual connections between particle physics itself and other sciences. Working in concert with other fields, we will gain new ways of understanding the world around us.
    Like what you see? Sign up for a free subscription to symmetry! .
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    Latest on the High Luminosity LHC project

    Agnes Szeberenyi More than 110 experts from all over the world gathered in Tsukuba, Japan for the 4th  Joint HiLumi LHC/ LARP Annual Meeting between 17 and 21 November 2014, hosted by the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK). [...]
    Agnes Szeberenyi More than 110 experts from all over the world gathered in Tsukuba, Japan for the 4th  Joint HiLumi LHC/ LARP Annual Meeting between 17 and 21 November 2014, hosted by the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK). The event celebrated that in June 2014 the CERN Council confirmed the priority status of the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project in the CERN scientific and financial programme by approving the Medium-Term Plan for the years 2015 to 2019, including the total cost of the project up to 2025.

    This is a key step, not only because it translates the deliberation of last year’s priority of the EU Strategy update for HEP into concrete action, but also because it allows for the long term planning of the various phases: R&D, design, industrialization, construction, installation and commissioning. The event started off with the plenary sessions where members of the CERN management as well as management of the collaboration (KEK, US LARP, US DoE) gave invited talks. After the welcome by Prof Atsuto Suzuki, KEK Director General, Dr. Yasuhiro Okada, KEK executive Director presented the KEK future programme for particle physics.
    This was followed by CERN Director of Accelerator and Technology, Dr Frederick Bordry on the LHC and CERN programme. The Future US Programme for Accelerator R&D was presented by Stephen Gourlay, head of the Superconducting Magnet Group of LBNL and member of the HEPAP subpanel advising DOE on future strategy.

     The first plenary session closed with the High Luminosity LHC status updated by Prof Lucio Rossi, HL-LHC Project Leader.
    Prof Rossi also officially announced the new HL LHC timeline to the collaborators.  The plenary was followed by expert talks on residual dose rate studies, layout and integration, optics and operation modes and QXF progress. Prof Akira Yamamoto presented the important results and recommendations of the recent SC Cable review.
    Invited talks were given by the LIU Project Leader, Dr Malika Meddahi on the LHC Injector Upgrade project, as well as the outcomes of the ECFA HL-LHC Experiments workshop was presented as an indication of close collaboration with the Experiments.

    One of the highlights of the plenaries was the status update on the Preliminary Design Report, as the main deliverable of the project, which will be published soon as a CERN Yellow Report. 3 days focused on the work package parallel sessions, reviewing the progress in design and R&D not only for the EU funded but also non-EU funded work packages.
    The event was closed by the summaries of the EU funded work packages, showing “excellent technical progress thanks to the hard and smart work of many, including senior and junior” – concluded Prof Rossi in his wrap up talk. For more on the key technical highlights from the activities look for the December Issue of Accelerating News to be published on 4 December. The upcoming meetings will be the LARP / HiLumi LHC meeting between 11-13 May 2015 at Fermilab and the final FP7 HiLumi LHC / LARP Collaboration Meeting between 26-30 October 2015 at CERN.
    As a contribution to the UNESCO International Year of Light, special events celebrating this occasion will be organized by HL LHC throughout the year. Stay tuned for the latest updates in the CERN Bulletin and CERN website. .
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    Fluid.IT – turning BYOD inside out, to focus on me

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    One of the issues with efforts like BYOD and IoT is that it can easily add more complexity for the individual. Attention is one of the scarcest resources we have and these new approaches need to demand less from [...]
    One of the issues with efforts like BYOD and IoT is that it can easily add more complexity for the individual. Attention is one of the scarcest resources we have and these new approaches need to demand less from users not more and more. They need to recognize the context of what’s happening and filter or even act upon it – rather than cry out for attention. There is quite a bit of press related to various approaches recently to shift how email is used, but most of these efforts still remain focused on email.
    Frankly, email is a conduit and most of us have many of these conduits feeding into our lives. Also, it is just one of many conduits, depending on your role.

    What I want is a digital butler on steroids that works on any device and makes sense of your e-life, e-work and e-history.
    It hides the complexities of the systems and provides a unified experience around me. This is exactly the kind of research some of the individuals in HP Labs and PPS showed me the other day. A tool called Fluid.
    IT that shifts your focus from the various sources (e-mail, CRM systems…) to focusing your attention on what you’re really like to get done – no matter where it needs to happen.

    With Fluid. IT you don’t need to know where your services are (after the initial setup), you just know it’s doing what you need done.
    This is sort of like when you put your money in the bank. You know something is happening there with it, but you don’t really care. You just want to be sure you can take it out when you need it.
    Fluid. IT derives the context and aggregates what is important to me, providing more about what I need and less about the plumbing of addressing that need. It includes concepts like liquid-talk that facilitates collaboration in the ideal method of the receiver not just the sender and allow for both enterprise-level and individual customization.
    The whole approach is delivered using platform independent techniques that allow you to consume wherever and whenever you need to. It is an examples of providing a customized approach in a standard way leveraging the tools that already exist in your personal and enterprise life.

    Are there systems where you can see this approach applied? I can see it for sales (as I mentioned with CRM) or in the healthcare provider space where you’re pulling together information from a variety of systems and would like to have situational awareness with minimal distractions.
    They have implemented gamification techniques to facilitate the behavioral understanding and improvement from across a range of systems. I see these kinds of systems as a stake in the ground for what we’ll all be expecting in the near future for our interactions.
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    Europa's Stunning Surface

    The puzzling, fascinating surface of Jupiter’s icy moon Europa looms large in this newly-reprocessed color view, made from images taken by NASA's Galileo spacecraft in the late 1990s. This is the color view of Europa from Galileo that shows the [...]
    The puzzling, fascinating surface of Jupiter’s icy moon Europa looms large in this newly-reprocessed color view, made from images taken by NASA's Galileo spacecraft in the late 1990s. This is the color view of Europa from Galileo that shows the largest portion of the moon's surface at the highest resolution. The view was previously released as a mosaic with lower resolution and strongly enhanced color (see PIA02590). To create this new version, the images were assembled into a realistic color view of the surface that approximates how Europa would appear to the human eye.
    The scene shows the stunning diversity of Europa’s surface geology. Long, linear cracks and ridges crisscross the surface, interrupted by regions of disrupted terrain where the surface ice crust has been broken up and re-frozen into new patterns.

    Color variations across the surface are associated with differences in geologic feature type and location.
    For example, areas that appear blue or white contain relatively pure water ice, while reddish and brownish areas include non-ice components in higher concentrations. The polar regions, visible at the left and right of this view, are noticeably bluer than the more equatorial latitudes, which look more white. This color variation is thought to be due to differences in ice grain size in the two locations.
      Images taken through near-infrared, green and violet filters have been combined to produce this view.

    The images have been corrected for light scattered outside of the image, to provide a color correction that is calibrated by wavelength. Gaps in the images have been filled with simulated color based on the color of nearby surface areas with similar terrain types.
    This global color view consists of images acquired by the Galileo Solid-State Imaging (SSI) experiment on the spacecraft's first and fourteenth orbits through the Jupiter system, in 1995 and 1998, respectively. Image scale is 1 mile (1. 6 kilometers) per pixel.
    North on Europa is at right. The Galileo mission was managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, for the agency's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena.
      Additional information about Galileo and its discoveries is available on the Galileo mission home page at http://solarsystem. nasa.

    gov/galileo/.

    More information about Europa is available at http: //solarsystem. nasa. gov/europa.

    Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SETI Institute
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    Beams come knocking on the LHC's door

    Katarina Anthony Over the weekend, proton beams came knocking on the Large Hadron Collider's (LHC) door. Shooting from the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) and into the two LHC injection lines, the proton beams were stopped just short of entering [...]
    Katarina Anthony Over the weekend, proton beams came knocking on the Large Hadron Collider's (LHC) door. Shooting from the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) and into the two LHC injection lines, the proton beams were stopped just short of entering the accelerator.   Although the actual physics run will not start until 2015, the LHC Operations team used these tests to check their control systems, beam instrumentation, transfer line alignment, perform the first optics measurements and to spot possible bottle necks in the beam trajectory. Furthermore, the ALICE and LHCb experiments could calibrate their detectors.
    "These initial tests are a milestone for the whole accelerator chain," says Reyes Alemany Fernandez, the engineer in charge of the LHC. "Not only was this the first time the injection lines have seen beams in over a year, it was also our first opportunity to test the LHC's operation system.

    We successfully commissioned the LHC's injection and ejection magnets, all without beam in the machine itself.
    " Just before entering the LHC, the beams were stopped by 21. 6 tonnes of graphite, aluminium and copper "beam dumps" that absorb the accelerated particles. Offshoot particles - primarily muons - generated during the dump were in turn used to calibrate ALICE and LHCb.
    "The experiments where given the precise timing of each beam dump, which allowed them to tune their detectors and trigger to the LHC clock," says Verena Kain, SPS supervisor.

      Following these successful extraction tests, the Operations team return to their preparations for the next run of the LHC. The first LHC tests with beams are scheduled for February 2015.

    Read more: "The proton beam knocks at the LHC door" – Update by the LHCb experiment collaboration
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    Bristol-Myers Squibb and Five Prime Therapeutics Announce Exclusive Clinical Collaboration to Evaluate the Combination of Investigational Immunotherapies Opdivo (nivolumab) and FPA008 in Six Tumor Types

    Dateline City: NEW YORK & SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. NEW YORK & SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Bristol-Myers Squibb Company (NYSE:BMY) and Five Prime Therapeutics, Inc. (Nasdaq:FPRX) today announced that they have entered into an exclusive clinical collaboration agreement to [...]
    Dateline City: NEW YORK & SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. NEW YORK & SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. --(BUSINESS WIRE)--Bristol-Myers Squibb Company (NYSE:BMY) and Five Prime Therapeutics, Inc.

    (Nasdaq: FPRX) today announced that they have entered into an exclusive clinical collaboration agreement to evaluate the safety, tolerability and preliminary efficacy of combining Opdivo (nivolumab), Bristol-Myers Squibb’s investigational PD-1 (programmed death-1) immune checkpoint inhibitor, with FPA008, Five Prime’s monoclonal antibody that inhibits colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R).

    Language: English Contact: Bristol-Myers SquibbMedia:Ken Dominski, 609-252-5251ken. dominski@bms. comorInvestors:Ranya Dajani, 609-252-5330ranya. dajani@bms.
    comorRyan Asay, 609-252-5020ryan. asay@bms.

    comorFive Prime Therapeutics:Amy Kendall, 415-365-5776amy.
    kendall@fiveprime. com Ticker Slug: Ticker: BMY Exchange: NYSE read more.
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    Rockwell Collins releases eBook 'Interoperability 2.0: the simulation and training tipping point’ for I/ITSEC 2014

    Rockwell Collins unveiled its latest eBook, "Interoperability 2.0:  the simulation and training tipping point" to coincide with the Interservice/Industry Training Simulation and Education Conference (I/ITSEC) 2014, December 1-4, in Orlando, Florida. The eBook shares the importance of interoperability in driving the [...]
    Rockwell Collins unveiled its latest eBook, "Interoperability 2. 0:  the simulation and training tipping point" to coincide with the Interservice/Industry Training Simulation and Education Conference (I/ITSEC) 2014, December 1-4, in Orlando, Florida. The eBook shares the importance of interoperability in driving the rapid acceptance of new simulation and training technologies by the aerospace and defense industry and military users. The eBook explains how interoperability can benefit the use of visual systems, distributed mission training and Live, Virtual, and Constructive training.
      In addition, it covers key industry subjects such as determining the ideal balance between live and virtual training and the utility of games technology in training.    “Our new eBook addresses future technology trends and explains how and where interoperability can be inserted into these trends in order to proliferate the adoption of new game-changing capabilities,” said LeAnn Ridgeway, vice president and general manager, Simulation and Training Solutions, Rockwell Collins.

    “There is still work to be done to make interoperability ubiquitous in training, and it is the collective responsibility of industry and government to make this happen to better enable warfighter readiness.
    ”  Other topics addressed in the eBook include the potential and use of new technologies such as speech recognition, touch displays, cloud networks and wearable training systems.
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