Future Cloud Workshop on Big Data Analytics

During recent years we have witnessed an unprecedented growth in data, emerging from wide range of sources that became available due to the rise of novel technologies as well as completely new ways that we sense and interact with the [...]
During recent years we have witnessed an unprecedented growth in data, emerging from wide range of sources that became available due to the rise of novel technologies as well as completely new ways that we sense and interact with the world.  Such Big Data hold enormous unlocked potential of knowledge and information that when unlocked can improve people's’ lives, change the way we live and open new business opportunities.   Tapping to Big Data is not an easy task because of its intrinsic properties: namely vast volume, high velocity, large variety and unknown veracity. During the Future Cloud Workshop on Big Data Analytics we will discuss the ways to efficiently tap into latent knowledge of Big Data as well as data mining and machine learning techniques used for such tasks.
We will also look into examples of exploiting the information extracted from Big Data from certain use-case scenarios.

We will start the day with the presentation by EIT ICT Labs Future Cloud action line leader Tua Huomo followed by Professor Divyakant Agrawal (UCSB, USA) who will explore the Big Data problem both from the system perspective as well as from the application perspective in his keynote “Big Data, Deep Learning, and other Allegories: Scalability and Fault-tolerance of Parallel andDistributed Infrastructures”.   Professor Matthias Grossglauser (EPFL, Switzerland) will discuss what interesting patterns can be uncovered from Swiss datasets related to state affairs and politics in his talk “Mining Democracy”.  Dr.  Ingmar Weber (QCRI, Qatar) will talk about doing Big Data Analytics for health in his talk “Using Social Media for Health Studies”.
We will end the day by Dr.  Cosmin (Google, USA) will talk about large-scale data processing and analytics using Google Cloud Dataflow.

This public workshop is part of the EIT ICT Labs Future Cloud Summer School.
  Agenda 9:00 - 10:00: EIT ICT Labs, Tua Huomo10:00 - 10:30: Coffee break10:30 - 11:30: Big Data, Deep Learning, and other Allegories: Scalability and Fault-tolerance of Parallel and Distributed Infrastructures, Divyakant Agrawal11:30 - 12:30: Mining Democracy, Matthias Grossglauser12:30 - 14:00: Lunch14:00 - 15:00: Using Social Media for Health Studies, Ingmar Weber15:00 - 16:00: Google Cloud Dataflow, Cosmin Arad16:00 - 16:30: Coffee break16:30 - 17:30: Google Cloud Dataflow, Cosmin Arad Venue Hotel Bergendal, Stockholm Registration.
02

> more news in this sector

In particular: A new podcast from ATLAS

Cian O'Luanaigh An upgraded Insertable B-Layer (IBL) was added to the inner detector of the ATLAS experiment during CERN's long shutdown last year (Image: Claudia Marcelloni/ATLAS) In Particular, a new podcast from particle physicists Tova Holmes and Laura Jeanty, [...]
Cian O'Luanaigh An upgraded Insertable B-Layer (IBL) was added to the inner detector of the ATLAS experiment during CERN's long shutdown last year (Image: Claudia Marcelloni/ATLAS) In Particular, a new podcast from particle physicists Tova Holmes and Laura Jeanty, brings you right to the heart of the ATLAS collaboration at CERN. Through interviews with researchers from all over the world, the podcast takes a very human look at what it's like to be a particle physicist, giving listeners a feel for what is it actually like to do science day to day in a large collaboration. The hosts, who both work on ATLAS projects at CERN with the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in the US, met while they both studied at Harvard, and these days sit next to each other at work. They are joined on the podcast by Zachary Marshall, also from Berkeley, and Larry Lee, from the University of Adelaide.

"A lot of the time, talk with our colleagues is about the everyday details of our work, and isn't necessarily related to why we got into it in the first place," says Jeanty, whose work focuses on two subdetectors on the ATLAS experiment: The pixel detector, and the Insertable B-Layer (IBL). "For me, doing the podcast is a fun way of exploring the more exciting and more human aspects of our work. " "It's occasionally something you might be afraid to do – to talk about the feelings you have about the work we do," says Holmes, who is conducting a supersymmetry analysis on ATLAS data. "Having a podcast is almost an excuse – it makes it easier to ask people those questions.
" The first episode of In particular covers what ATLAS physicists, as people, would most like to see in new data from Run 2 of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The second explores how this collaboration prepared their experiment for the LHC's run at 13 teraelectronvolts (TeV).

With many more episodes planned, and interviews dusted for at least the next three, there's plenty more to listen to.
Check out the podcast over at inparticular. web. cern.
ch  .

03

> more news in this sector

Counting stars with Gaia

This image, based on housekeeping data from ESA’s Gaia satellite, is no ordinary depiction of the heavens. While the image portrays the outline of our Galaxy, the Milky Way, and of its neighbouring Magellanic Clouds, it was obtained in [...]
This image, based on housekeeping data from ESA’s Gaia satellite, is no ordinary depiction of the heavens. While the image portrays the outline of our Galaxy, the Milky Way, and of its neighbouring Magellanic Clouds, it was obtained in a rather unusual way. .
04

> more news in this sector

Research Headlines - Providing electric vehicles with longer lasting energy

EU-funded researchers have used novel carbon materials to make lightweight, energy-efficient supercapacitors, the energy storage devices that supply power to electric vehicles during acceleration. Their work promises to extend the distance electric vehicles can travel before a recharge. This improved [...]
EU-funded researchers have used novel carbon materials to make lightweight, energy-efficient supercapacitors, the energy storage devices that supply power to electric vehicles during acceleration. Their work promises to extend the distance electric vehicles can travel before a recharge. This improved performance could boost their appeal on the market, help make EU manufacturers more competitive, and contribute to the EU's goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions.
05

> more news in this sector

Northwest Sardinia

Earth observation image of the week: a false-colour image from Sentinel-2A over part of the Italian island of Sardinia, also featured on the Earth from Space video programme
Earth observation image of the week: a false-colour image from Sentinel-2A over part of the Italian island of Sardinia, also featured on the Earth from Space video programme
06

> more news in this sector

The first subsea wet gas compressor in the world at Gullfaks

After several years of technology development, construction and testing the first subsea wet gas compressor in the world is now installed at the Gullfaks C platform in the North Sea.
After several years of technology development, construction and testing the first subsea wet gas compressor in the world is now installed at the Gullfaks C platform in the North Sea. .
08

> more news in this sector

Active pits on Rosetta’s comet

Some of the dust jets emitted from Rosetta’s comet can be traced back to active pits on its surface. They could be the remnants of collapsed cavities.
Some of the dust jets emitted from Rosetta’s comet can be traced back to active pits on its surface. They could be the remnants of collapsed cavities.
09

> more news in this sector

K+S rejects unsolicited takeover proposal

Following a thorough review of all aspects and considering the overall circumstances, the Board of Executive Directors and the Supervisory Board of K+S Aktiengesellschaft today have decided to reject the unsolicited proposal of Potash Corporation of Saskatchewan Inc. (PotashCorp) to [...]
Following a thorough review of all aspects and considering the overall circumstances, the Board of Executive Directors and the Supervisory Board of K+S Aktiengesellschaft today have decided to reject the unsolicited proposal of Potash Corporation of Saskatchewan Inc. (PotashCorp) to acquire all outstanding shares of K+S Aktiengesellschaft for 41 Euro per share. The proposed transaction does not reflect the fundamental value of K+S and is not in the best interest of the company.

Inappropriate proposal of 41 Euro Norbert Steiner, CEO of K+S, said: “Jointly with the Supervisory Board we have come to the conclusion that the proposed price of 41 Euro per share does not adequately reflect the fundamental value of K+S. Not only does this proposal undervalue our potash and magnesium products and our salt business, it completely disregards the value of our Legacy Project. The book value alone represents 11 Euro per share; considering future earnings we calculate a value of up to 21 Euro per share. This is not yet reflected in the share price.
”  Legacy is the first greenfield project in the potash industry in almost 40 years. K+S has already invested more than 2 billion Euro in the project which is on time and on budget.

The first tonnes of potash will be produced by the end of 2016 and positive cash flows will be generated already from 2017 onwards.
“We believe PotashCorp is trying to take advantage of the valuation gap to take over K+S and gain control over Legacy,” Steiner added. Proposal not in the best interest of the Company Furthermore, the K+S Executive Board and the Supervisory Board are also convinced that the proposed transaction is not in the best interest of the company. In addition, it does not adequately consider the interests of employees worldwide or the interests of the regions in which the company operates responsibly.
The Boards have not been suitably convinced by PotashCorp that they have a  sustained interest in continuing the fertilizer and salt businesses in their current form, which are strategically, technically and economically intertwined.

“PotashCorp has made no firm commitments to protect the interests of the more than 14,000 employees of K+S worldwide. Despite repeated requests to address this question, PotashCorp’s answers have remained vague.
In Germany alone there are more than 30,000 direct and indirect jobs associated with the domestic raw material production and mining of mineral nutrients by K+S. ” Steiner said. Attractive outlook for K+S Group K+S’ strong outlook is also driven by ongoing strategic initiatives across both the potash and magnesium and salt business units.
The “Salt 2020” strategy alone is expected to produce a sustainable increase in operating profit of up to 250 million Euro. Furthermore, the “Fit for the Future” efficiency program is expected to deliver cumulative cost savings of more than 500 million Euro by the end of 2016. Overall, K+S expects to see Group EBITDA to increase to 1.
6 billion Euro by 2020 with the Legacy Project contributing on average annual operating cash flow growth of more than 10% up to this point. Since the Boards continue to remain committed to its dividend policy of a pay out of between 40-50% of its adjusted operating income after taxes, shareholders can look forward to an attractive dividend yield in the coming years.

“We are strong in potash and we are strong in salt.

There is one positive effect of PotashCorp’s proposal: It is a crystallizing event for the fundamental re-rating of K+S. ” Note An interview featuring K+S CEO Norbert Steiner as well as additional information is available at www. k-plus-s. com.

A conference call with Dr Burkhard Lohr, CFO of K+S Aktiengesellschaft, in English will take place today at 4: 30PM CET. Investors, analysts and press representatives as well as interested parties from the general public are invited to follow the conference via a live webcast (www. k-plus-s. com/webcast).
The conference will be recorded and made available for replay. About K+S K+S is an international resources company.

We have been mining and processing mineral raw materials for 125 years.
The products we produce from them are used worldwide in agriculture, food and road safety and are important elements in numerous industrial processes. Potash and salt are integral nutrients for the megatrend of a constantly growing and increasingly prosperous global population striving for a higher standard of living. This will result in increasing consumption of mineral resources.
We serve the resulting growth in demand from production sites in Europe, North America and South America as well as through a global distribution network.

K+S is the world’s largest salt producer and one of the top potash providers worldwide. With more than 14,000 employees, K+S achieved revenues in financial year 2014 of about 3.
8 billion Euro and an EBIT of 641 million Euro. K+S is the commodities stock on the German DAX index. Learn more about K+S at www.
k-plus-s. com.
14

> more news in this sector

How petunias know when to start smelling sweet

bee in magenta petunia
Researchers have identified a key mechanism plants use to decide when to release their floral scents to attract pollinators. The findings connect the production and release of these fragrant chemicals to the innate circadian rhythms that pulse through all [...]
Researchers have identified a key mechanism plants use to decide when to release their floral scents to attract pollinators. The findings connect the production and release of these fragrant chemicals to the innate circadian rhythms that pulse through all life on Earth. The researchers turned to the common garden petunia, a white-flowered hybrid that releases an aromatic, sweet-smelling fragrance in the evening to attract insect pollinators, such as hawk moths. “Plants emit these scents when they want to attract their pollinators,” says Takato Imaizumi, associate professor of biology at University of Washington.
“It makes sense that they should time this with when the pollinators will be around. ” The researchers discovered a major gene that controls when the petunia releases its fragrance.

The gene—known by its acronym LHY—is found in many plant species and is a key component of the plant “circadian clock.
” Biologists have long recognized that creatures like plants, humans, and even tiny bacteria all have circadian clocks—genes that keep cells synchronized to the 24-hour cycle of life on Earth and regulate cellular activities based on the time of day. Opposite timing Researchers had previously shown that LHY is a component of the circadian clock in other flowering plants, but the new paper, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, marks the first time biologists have connected LHY activity to flower scent. “Now we’re finding out what the bridge is between the circadian clock and scent production and release,” says Myles Fenske, a doctoral student in biology.
Since no one had ever studied the LHY gene in petunias, the researchers gathered basic information about LHY to show that it has the same circadian functions as it does in other plant species.

Many circadian clock genes are only active at specific times of the day, when they influence the activity of other genes that control what cells are doing. The petunia LHY gene is most active in the morning, at the opposite time of day when the flower releases its fragrant evening scent.
A burst of morning activity The scientists hypothesized that LHY’s morning activity might repress the production of scented chemicals. When they prolonged LHY’s activity into the evening, the petunias didn’t release their fragrant chemicals at all. “That was perfect,” Imaizumi says.
“It is exactly what I would hope to see. ” If LHY’s activity truly did have a negative effect on scent production, then petunia plants that lacked the LHY gene’s burst of morning activity might produce and release their scents earlier in the day. When the researchers created petunia plants with reduced LHY activity, those plants produced and released fragrant chemicals four to eight hours earlier in the day.
The team even discovered how LHY represses floral scent production. It interferes with the activity of ODO1, another petunia gene that promotes the production and release of floral scents.

‘Change the cues’ By repressing ODO1 activity early in the day, LHY stops the floral scent assembly line in its tracks.
When the LHY gene becomes less active later in the day, ODO1 is able to ramp up production of the fragrant chemicals just in time for the evening aromatic release. Since genes like LHY and ODO1 are present in most—if not all—flowering  plants, Imaizumi and his team believe that the interactions between these two genes may be a common mechanism for a plant’s circadian clock to influence or control the production of fragrant floral scents. If so, then changes to the strength or timing of the LHY-ODO1 bridge may explain how flowers change the timing of scent production as they evolve.
The researchers are now testing if pollinators have a preference between normal garden petunias or petunias with altered LHY activity.

In time, these experiments may pave the way for scientists to improve the pollination efficiency of other plants, including important crop species. “We think you can really change a plant’s success by changing these cues,” Imaizumi says.
The National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation funded the work.

Source: University of Washington The post How petunias know when to start smelling sweet appeared first on Futurity.
15

> more news in this sector

Is the universe less crowded than scientists thought?

James Webb Space Telescope
New research cuts the estimated number of the most distant galaxies by 10 to 100 times. Over the years, the Hubble Space Telescope has allowed astronomers to look deep into the universe. The long view stirred theories of untold [...]
New research cuts the estimated number of the most distant galaxies by 10 to 100 times. Over the years, the Hubble Space Telescope has allowed astronomers to look deep into the universe. The long view stirred theories of untold thousands of distant, faint galaxies. “Our work suggests that there are far fewer faint galaxies than we once previously thought,” says Brian O’Shea, associate professor of physics and astronomy at Michigan State University.
“Earlier estimates placed the number of faint galaxies in the early universe to be hundreds or thousands of times larger than the few bright galaxies that we can actually see with the Hubble Space Telescope. We now think that number could be closer to ten times larger.

” O’Shea and his team used the National Science Foundation’s Blue Waters supercomputer to run simulations to examine the formation of galaxies in the early universe.
The team simulated thousands of galaxies at a time, including the galaxies’ interactions through gravity or radiation. The simulated galaxies were consistent with observed distant galaxies at the bright end of the distribution—in other words, those that have been discovered and confirmed. The simulations didn’t, however, reveal an exponentially growing number of faint galaxies, as has been previously predicted.
The number of those at the lower end of the brightness distribution was flat rather than increasing sharply, O’Shea adds.

These simulations will be tested further when the much-anticipated James Webb Space Telescope comes online in late 2018. The improved technology will afford astronomers even more-detailed views of space than the amazing images that the Hubble has produced in recent years.
The Hubble Space Telescope can see the tip of the iceberg of the most-distant galaxies, says Michael Norman, coauthor of the paper and director of the San Diego Supercomputer Center at the University of California, San Diego. While the James Webb telescope will improve views of distant galaxies, the telescope has a relatively small field of view. As a result, the observations must take into account cosmic variance—the statistical variation in the number of galaxies from place to place.
That’s what makes these simulations pertinent even as improved technology becomes available, O’Shea says. “A deeper understanding based on theory may be necessary to correctly interpret what’s being seen, such as high redshift survey results,” he says. In addition to O’Shea and Norman, the research team also includes John Wise, an assistant professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology, and Hao Xu, a postdoctoral research associate at the University of California, San Diego.
Their work, funded by the National Science Foundation and NASA, appears in the Astrophysical Journal Letters.

Source: Michigan State University The post Is the universe less crowded than scientists thought? appeared first on Futurity.
16

> more news in this sector

‘Smart’ mouth guard knows if you grind your teeth

chattering teeth toy with eyes
A new mouth guard equipped with sensors can tell if you grind your teeth, clue in your dentist, and even help you stop. What’s more, the next version of the guard, currently under development, may be able to tell [...]
A new mouth guard equipped with sensors can tell if you grind your teeth, clue in your dentist, and even help you stop. What’s more, the next version of the guard, currently under development, may be able to tell when an athlete is becoming dehydrated, overheated, and even whether he or she may have gotten a concussion. Researchers came up with the idea about five years ago while developing a set of dentures that alert the dentist to an improper fit even if the patient doesn’t complain about it. That got them thinking about something similar that could help an even larger share of the population—people who suffer from bruxism, aka teeth-grinding.
Damaged teeth and insomina At least 20 percent of the US population—about 30 million people—suffer from bruxism, which frequently is caused by stress and can lead to damaged teeth, headaches, insomnia, and a sore jaw. Most people don’t even know they do it—the most common way to diagnose it is for the patient to spend a night in a sleep clinic.

Wouldn’t it be easier and more efficient, researchers thought, for the patient to stay home using a mouth guard equipped with sensors that could detect bruxism, measure how much force was being applied by the jaw, and which teeth were most affected? “Wearing a mouth guard is less intrusive than spending time in a sleep clinic,” says Fong Wong, associate professor in University of Florida’s Restorative Dental Sciences Department and Craniofacial Center.
“It cuts cost when it reduces the number of clinical psychology sessions. ” Extended treatment The prototype does all of that and can send the information to a computer or smart phone via Bluetooth, where a dentist or orthodontist can retrieve it, make a diagnosis, and suggest treatment. “That kind of information has been unavailable until now,” says Yong-Kyu “YK” Yoon, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering.
The mouth guard is an improvement over traditional bruxism therapies, such as behavioral modification training during clinical sessions, Wong says.

“The advantage is that the guard extends the treatment beyond the time spent in the clinic. This promises greater effectiveness and lower cost.
” One group that could particularly benefit from the smart mouth guard is combat veterans with post-traumatic stress, which can lead to bruxism. But the smart mouth guard’s potential extends beyond dentistry. The next iteration could be aimed at athletes.
Using different types of sensors, it could detect dehydration or dangerous core body temperature and could measure the strength of a blow to the head, which could give doctors early warning about the possibility of a concussion and alert a coach to pull a player off the field.

Source: University of Florida The post ‘Smart’ mouth guard knows if you grind your teeth appeared first on Futurity.
17

> more news in this sector

Toddlers can use iPads by age two

baby uses tablet/iPad
By the age of two most toddlers are able to use a tablet with only a little help from an adult. Other research has explored the prevalence of tablet use by young children, but the new study, in which [...]
By the age of two most toddlers are able to use a tablet with only a little help from an adult. Other research has explored the prevalence of tablet use by young children, but the new study, in which researchers watched more than 200 YouTube videos, is the first to investigate how infants and toddlers actually use iPads and other electronic devices. “By age two, 90 percent of the children in the videos had a moderate ability to use a tablet,” says Juan Pablo Hourcade, associate professor of computer science at the University of Iowa. “Just over 50 percent of 12-to-17-month-old children in the videos had a moderate ability.
” Toddler apps The researchers defined “moderate ability” as needing help from an adult to access apps, but being able to use them while displaying some difficulty with basic interactions. Hourcade says he was inspired to use YouTube videos by another researcher who analyzed online videos of computer use by people with motor impairments.

Watching YouTube videos allowed his group to conduct the research without having to ask infants and toddlers to use tablets, something that some pediatricians discourage.
“On the other hand, we know that infants and toddlers are using iPads and other devices because we’ve seen the videos recorded by their parents, and surveys confirm it is happening. It’s happened really quickly—before we could get out and arrange for more conventional studies,” he says. While there are drawbacks to using unsolicited YouTube videos, such as not knowing the exact ages of the children pictured and that the children pictured were selected by their caregivers and may not be representative of the larger society, the researchers were able to estimate the ages of the children (two-thirds of the videos included the age) and observe a clear progression of successful performance linked to age that is consistent with developmental milestones.
“One of the biggest differences we found is that when children turn one year old, they switch from using both hands and all their fingers to interact with the tablet to using an index finger—which is what adults do,” he says.

He says he hopes that the study will influence the development of apps that encourage interactive education for infants and toddlers. The apps he envisions might be similar to the social and interactive-like children’s programs currently found on public television.
“We may be able to use research on what makes certain children’s educational television programs beneficial as a starting point and go on from there,” he says. The paper is published in the proceedings of the CHI 2015 conference.

Source: University of Iowa The post Toddlers can use iPads by age two appeared first on Futurity.
18

> more news in this sector

The wonderful thing about triggers

Physicist Jim Pivarski explains how particle detectors know when to record data. Imagine you're a particle physicist in 1932. You have a cloud chamber that can show you the tracks of particles, and you have a camera to capture those [...]
Physicist Jim Pivarski explains how particle detectors know when to record data. Imagine you're a particle physicist in 1932. You have a cloud chamber that can show you the tracks of particles, and you have a camera to capture those tracks for later analysis. How do you set up an apparatus to take pictures whenever tracks appear? At first, you might just try to be quick with your finger, but since the tracks disappear in a quarter of a second, you'd end up with a lot of near misses.
You might give up and snap pictures randomly, since you'll be lucky some fraction of the time. Naturally, this wasteful process doesn't work if the type of event you're looking for is rare.

You could also leave the shutter open and expose the film to anything that appears over a long interval.
All events would overlap in the same picture, making it harder to interpret.

Now suppose you have another piece of equipment: a Geiger counter. This device emits an electric signal every time a charged particle passes through it. Two physicists, Blackett and Occhialini, surrounded their cloud chamber with Geiger counters and used the electric signals to trigger the cloud chamber and take pictures. This kind of apparatus is crucial to detectors today.
Experiments such as CMS only record one in a million LHC collisions — the rest are lost to further analysis. Collisions that break up protons but do not create new particles are 10 billion times more common than collisions that produce Higgs bosons, so modern triggers must be extremely selective.

Blackett and Occhialini's original trigger system relied on two Geiger counters: one above and one below the cloud chamber. Each Geiger counter was noisy and therefore prone to taking bad pictures, but both counters were unlikely to accidentally trigger at the same time. The two electronic signals were passed through a circuit that registered only if both counters triggered. Today, triggers combine millions of data channels in complex ways, but the main idea is the same.
Events should be selected only if signals in adjacent detectors line up. The desired geometric patterns are encoded into microchips for fast, coarse decisions and then are computed in detail using a farm of computers that make slower decisions downstream.

The modern trigger filter resembles a pipeline: Microchips make tens of millions of decisions per second and then pass on hundreds of thousands of candidates per second to the computing farm. By comparison, Google's computing farm handles 40,000 search queries per second. A version of this article was published in Fermilab Today. Like what you see? Sign up for a free subscription to symmetry! .
19

> more news in this sector

Mactan Cebu International Airport implements Rockwell Collins' ARINC vMUSE for improved passenger processing

CEBU CITY, Philippines (July 2, 2015) – Mactan Cebu International Airport has selected Rockwell Collins' ARINC airport solutions to improve its passengers' travel experiences. The airport is currently using ARINC vMUSE™ common-use passenger processing system (CUPPS) as well as [...]
CEBU CITY, Philippines (July 2, 2015) – Mactan Cebu International Airport has selected Rockwell Collins' ARINC airport solutions to improve its passengers' travel experiences. The airport is currently using ARINC vMUSE™ common-use passenger processing system (CUPPS) as well as ARINC SelfServ™ common-use self-service (CUSS) kiosks, and will soon implement many of the company's other solutions including ARINC AirVue™ Flight Information Display System (FIDS), AirDB 7™, the latest generation ARINC Airport Operational Database (AODB) system and ARINC BagLink™, a baggage messaging server. As part of the deployment, Rockwell Collins has teamed with Gunnebo AB to streamline the entire check-in process by implementing ARINC™ VeriPax on Gunnebo Security Group automated gates. The gates will validate passenger flight details, enhancing security at the airport.
"Rockwell Collins was able to seamlessly migrate our systems from the previous vendor to ARINC vMUSE in record time, providing our airport with a superior passenger processing system without disrupting our travelers," said Andrew Acquaah-Harrison, chief executive advisor, GMR Megawide Cebu Airport Corporation (GMCAC). "We are extremely pleased to be implementing all of these ARINC airport solutions to improve our operations while keeping costs low.

" "Tourism is one of the major drivers of the Philippines' economy so ensuring that travelers have a positive experience is critically important," said Heament John Kurian, managing director, IMS Asia Pacific for Rockwell Collins.
"Using the latest ARINC self-service based technologies is enabling Cebu to become an IATA Fast Travel Airport, which is focused on providing more choices for passengers and lower costs for the industry. We are excited to help facilitate Cebu's transition. " Rockwell Collins' airport systems management organization, ARINC Managed Services, is responsible for the on-site maintenance and support of all the systems.
With this latest agreement, all of the common use airports in the Philippines are now using the ARINC common-use passenger processing platform (CUPPS) to provide a better travel experience for their passengers.

About Rockwell Collins Rockwell Collins is a pioneer in the development and deployment of innovative communication and aviation electronic solutions for both commercial and government applications. Our expertise in flight deck avionics, cabin electronics, mission communications, simulation and training, and information management services is delivered by a global workforce, and a service and support network that crosses more than 150 countries.
To find out more, please visit www. rockwellcollins. com.
About Gunnebo The Gunnebo Security Group is a global leader in security products, services and solutions with an offering covering cash handling, safes and vaults, entrance security and electronic security for banks, retail, CIT, mass transit, airports, and public and commercial administration.
20

> more news in this sector

« Back to main news page

Previous | 1 2 3 4 | Next