Urban Life and Mobility - EIT ICT Labs Results Day

On December 18, with our research, industry and academic partners, our start-ups and our students, all engaged into innovation and entrepreneurship, we are delighted to invite you to join, meet and discover who we are and what we do, along [...]
On December 18, with our research, industry and academic partners, our start-ups and our students, all engaged into innovation and entrepreneurship, we are delighted to invite you to join, meet and discover who we are and what we do, along Urban Life & Mobility area. EIT ICT Labs was set up in 2010 by the European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT), as an initiative of the European Union. It is an organisation dedicated to innovation in the field of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT). It is located in 9 countries and 13 cities in Europe, including Paris, Rennes and Sophia Antipolis in France.
At EIT ICT Labs, we strongly believe that Europe is what we do and we are putting all our efforts building up the place that will make the difference. We are also well aware that this is urgent time for doing, so as to recover economic growth, create jobs and improve the quality of life.

On December 18, we will present you some of our results, illustrated through disruptive activities in Urban Life & Mobility, one of our innovation areas.
It does not only deal with Smart Cities, but mostly with Smart Citizens. The emergence of new behaviours is at the origin of new business models, resulting in value creation and renewed city governance. We look forward to meeting you, so as to do even more together.
Stéphane AmargerEIT ICT Labs Paris Node Director Gilles BétisUrban Life & Mobility Action Line Leader EIT ICT Labs See full programme and registration HERE.

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CeNS Publication Award Winners 2014!

On Friday, November 28th, the winners of this year's CeNS Publication Awards were announced to the CeNS members during a festive event. Ten awards were presented in the categories "Best Interdisciplinary Publication", "Scientific Breakthrough" and "Best Junior Scientist Publication". With [...]
On Friday, November 28th, the winners of this year's CeNS Publication Awards were announced to the CeNS members during a festive event. Ten awards were presented in the categories "Best Interdisciplinary Publication", "Scientific Breakthrough" and "Best Junior Scientist Publication". With this award, remarkably successful cooperation projects within CeNS as well as outstanding research of an individual research group of CeNS were distinguished. Each year, CeNS awards prizes for excellent publications of CeNS members which have been published during the past 12 months.
This year, the candidates submitted numerous articles which appeared in high-impact journals between October 2013 and October 2014. List of Publication Award Winners 2014.

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Visualizing the NanoBio Interface with Nanoscale Resolution

Visualizing the NanoBio Interface with Nanoscale Resolution November 21, 2014 By combining magnetic nanoparticles with a common chemotherapy drug, users from Argonne's Materials Science Division and the University of Chicago, working with the Center for Nanoscale Materials’ Nanobio Interfaces and X-ray [...]
Visualizing the NanoBio Interface with Nanoscale ResolutionNovember 21, 2014By combining magnetic nanoparticles with a common chemotherapy drug, users from Argonne's Materials Science Division and the University of Chicago, working with the Center for Nanoscale Materials’ Nanobio Interfaces and X-ray Microscopy Groups, created a way to deliver anti-cancer drugs directly into the nucleus of cancer cells. The CNM hard x-ray nanoprobe beamline at the APS visualized the platinum distribution using x-ray fluorescence microscopy pinpointed the Pt distribution at the subcellular level at less than 100 nm resolution. .
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JOIN OUR NAVSEA SHIP ACQUISITION TEAM!

Mark your calendar for our upcoming two-day open house! We’re searching for highly motivated and cleared engineers, managers, subject matter experts, analysts and adminstrators to join our current staff in the following areas:
Mark your calendar for our upcoming two-day open house! We’re searching for highly motivated and cleared engineers, managers, subject matter experts, analysts and adminstrators to join our current staff in the following areas:
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Horses are likely related to this animal from India

An artist's depiction of Cambaytherium thewissi
Working at the edge of a coal mine in India, scientists have unearthed a treasure trove of teeth and bones. The discovery fills a major gap in what scientists know about the evolution of animals like horses and rhinoceroses. Modern horses, [...]
Working at the edge of a coal mine in India, scientists have unearthed a treasure trove of teeth and bones. The discovery fills a major gap in what scientists know about the evolution of animals like horses and rhinoceroses. Modern horses, rhinos, and tapirs belong to a biological order called Perissodactyla, also known as “odd-toed ungulates. ” An artist’s depiction of Cambaytherium thewissi.

(Credit: Elaine Kasmer) They have, as the name implies, an uneven number of toes on their hind feet and a distinctive digestive system. Other species in the order include zebras and donkeys. Though paleontologists had found remains of Perissodactyla from as far back as the beginnings of the Eocene epoch, about 56 million years ago, their earlier evolution has remained a mystery, says Ken Rose, professor of functional anatomy and evolution at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. In 2001, researchers began exploring Eocene sediments in western India because it had been proposed that perissodactyls and some other mammal groups might have originated there.
In an open-pit coal mine northeast of Mumbai, they uncovered a rich vein of ancient bones. Researchers received funding from the National Geographic Society and have sent a team to the mine site at Gujarat in the far western part of India every year or two over the past decade.

‘Not a simple story’ The mine yielded an incredible collection of teeth and bones.
Of these, more than 200 fossils turned out to belong to an animal dubbed Cambaytherium thewissi, about which little had been known. Related Articles On FuturitySyracuse UniversityEndangered whales are breeding in a busy shipping laneUniversity of ArizonaHidden cameras catch wild cat travelsUniversity of California, DavisSea star sex reveals evolution in a jiffyCalifornia Institute of TechnologyFight parasites with compounds in wormsUniversity of SouthamptonShrinking gave bird ancestors an edgeStanford UniversityIn acidic water, reef runs wild with algae The researchers dated the fossils to about 54. 5 million years old, making them slightly younger than the oldest known Perissodactyla remains.
The fossils open a window, however, onto what a common ancestor of all Perissodactyla would have looked like.

“Many of Cambaytherium’s features, like the teeth, the number of sacral vertebrae, and the bones of the hands and feet, are intermediate between Perissodactyla and more primitive animals,” Rose says. “This is the closest thing we’ve found to a common ancestor of the Perissodactyla order.
” Cambaytherium and other finds from the Gujarat coal mine also provide tantalizing clues about India’s separation about 90 million years ago from Madagascar, its migration, and its eventual collision and merger with the continent of Asia as the Earth’s plates shifted. In 1990, two researchers, David Krause and Mary Maas of Stony Brook University, suggested that several groups of mammals that appeared at the beginning of the Eocene, including primates and odd- and even-toed ungulates, might have evolved in India while it was isolated. Cambaytherium is the first concrete evidence to support that idea, Rose says.
But, he adds, “It’s not a simple story. ” Was India isolated? “Around Cambaytherium‘s time, we think India was an island, but it also had primates and a rodent similar to those living in Europe at the time,” he says. “One possible explanation is that India passed close by the Arabian Peninsula or the Horn of Africa, and there was a land bridge that allowed the ancestors of these groups to reach India.
But Cambaytherium is unique (to India) and suggests that India was indeed isolated for a while. ” The team was “very fortunate that we discovered the (Gujarat) site and that the mining company allowed us to work there,” Rose says, although “it was frustrating knowing that countless fossils were being chewed up by heavy mining equipment.

” When coal extraction was finished, the miners covered the site, he says.
His team has now found other mines in the area to continue digging. Other authors of the study are from Rowan University, Garhwal University, the Wadia Institute of Himalayan Geology, Ghent University, Panjab University, the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences, and Johns Hopkins. The National Geographic Society, the Belgian Science Policy Office, the National Science Foundation, and the Wadia Institute of Himalayan Geology funded the work, which appears in the journal Nature Communications.

Source: Johns Hopkins University The post Horses are likely related to this animal from India appeared first on Futurity.
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‘Nanoreactor’ works like a virtual chemistry set

methane3
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

New clues in quest for liquid methane

  • Nanotubes + ink + paper = instant battery
  • chemicalbonding3
  • deep_carbon_525
  • "What happens to those people and sustainability of a system when you develop right up to the edge?" Jose Fragoso asks. "This model could eventually allow us to make these sorts of projections." (Credit: Rainforest Action Network/Flickr)
  • runforit_525
    In 1952, a famous experiment mixed together chemicals that were present early in Earth’s history, then approximately replicated the environmental conditions on the planet at that time. The goal was to see if biologically relevant organic molecules would form spontaneously. [...]
    In 1952, a famous experiment mixed together chemicals that were present early in Earth’s history, then approximately replicated the environmental conditions on the planet at that time. The goal was to see if biologically relevant organic molecules would form spontaneously. That work, the Urey-Miller experiment, produced more than 20 molecules that are important to life, but a team of chemists thinks it can do one step better. The group has built a computer model that can not only determine all the possible products of the Urey-Miller experiment, but also detail all the possible chemical reactions that lead to their formation.
    The nanoreactor, as they call the model, could help scientists discover chemical reactions and mechanisms that improve the efficiency of fuel combustion or batteries, or reveal opportunities for new drugs. Just ‘let it run’ The nanoreactor, which is described in a recent issue of Nature Chemistry, works something like a virtual chemistry set.

    Simply enter the structure of some target chemicals into the computer model, set the environmental conditions—such as temperature or pressure—and let it run.
    Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillNew clues in quest for liquid methaneStanford UniversityNanotubes + ink + paper = instant batteryUniversity of California at IrvineCandid camera at the nanoscaleJohns Hopkins UniversityHow deep carbon could pop up on Earth’s surfaceStanford UniversitySoftware predicts how contact will change indigenous peopleCornell UniversityWatch squishy creatures evolve to run Then, algorithms begin to solve the quantum mechanical problems for each electron in the molecules as they interact—where are they likely to move from chemical to chemical, and what mechanisms must occur for those movements to take place? Each step is recorded along the way. “You can just hit a button and it will tell you all the reactions that are important,” says senior author Todd Martinez, the professor of chemistry at Stanford University. “It uses a hybrid approach that incorporates physics and machine learning to discover all the possible ways that your chemicals might react, and that might include reactions or mechanisms we’ve never seen before.
    ” Traditionally, producing this type of information involves sitting down with a pencil and paper and sketching electron movements, which limits the work to sets of a few atoms because of the sheer complexity and number of possible outcomes.

    Running on a desktop computer, the nanoreactor can simulate 100 to 200 atoms at a time, and produce results in a couple of hours. Mysterious combustion The nanoreactor could reveal reactions and mechanism that have tremendous applications in refining important chemical processes that we rely on every day.
    Consider, for instance, combustion reaction that powers gas-fueled automobiles. “Combustion involves many hundreds of reactions, and we don’t even know all that’s occurring. This is a way to discover those using theory,” Martinez says.
    “If you can know all the reactions, then you can identify which are actually key to sustaining combustion, and which lead to detrimental soot. And then you could maybe figure out how to stop soot formation, or to shut down other undesirable reaction pathways. ” Martinez expects the nanoreactor to reveal opportunities for developing catalysts that improve the efficiency of known reactions, particularly in applications such as fuel cells or batteries.
    Similarly, the model could provide a better understanding of the biochemical reactions critical in human health and disease, leading the way to new drug development. Coauthors contributed from Stanford and Advanced Micro Devices.

    The group plans to refine the nanoreactor, with an ultimate goal of sharing it with other scientists as an open source platform.

    Source: Stanford University The post ‘Nanoreactor’ works like a virtual chemistry set appeared first on Futurity.
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  • Listen to your assets: Asset Performance Management enhances reliability, saves money

    As power grids get smarter, utilities have access to new data that can help them manage grid assets far more effectively. But which factors are most important to watch closely?

    In a recent presentation to the Hong Kong Institution of Engineers, Jorge Martinez (Product Manager at Siemens Smart Grid Solutions & Services) explained how transmission and distribution network operators can use data to enhance asset management strategies. The presentation was based on a Siemens paper prepared for this conference and entitled “Listen to Your Assets! Developing More Effective Asset Management Strategies.” The paper is co-authored by Mr. Peter Dunker, Mr. Juan Carlos Ledezma, Mr. Armando Ferreira and Dr. Ramón Nadira.

    Asset Performance Management (APM) vastly improves reliability while cutting costs. This is why ISO 55000 (the latest international standard for infrastructure asset management) recognizes and recommends APM. Siemens Network Services practices APM every day.

    Studies have shown that a large percentage of power outages are predictable, and therefore preventable with appropriately timed interventions (such as regular or emergency maintenance, refurbishment or retrofit, or replacement). This represents a tremendous opportunity for asset owners and operators.

    Listening to your assets involves capturing, processing, analyzing and ultimately acting upon information about grid assets — as well as about how your assets are functioning as part of your overall system.

    Data-enhanced asset management strategies can help utilities address key challenges such as:

    • Maximizing grid performance.
    • Determining the right to time to perform an asset intervention.
    • Anticipating asset failures more accurately, and estimating useful life of equipment.
    • Deciding whether to follow the  manufacturer’s recommended maintenance schedule — and assessing associated risks.

    Key steps in listening to your assets:

    1. Shift the basis of maintenance planning. The next stage in the evolution of asset management involves two practices: Condition Based Maintenance (CBM) and Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM). These use the current condition of assets (monitored in near-real time) to determine which interventions might be required  — before equipment failure and possible service outages occur. To make this shift, utilities must develop a condition index (sometimes called a health index) — a numerical representation of the estimated condition of a given asset. This metric is highly customized; it must precisely suit every asset type used by a particular system or utility.

    2. Rate the importance of specific assets. This involves developing indices to measure importance and criticality/risk. These indices must then be considered in context. For instance, the importance index for a specific asset can be integrated with that asset’s condition index. This can yield actionable recommendations for that asset.

    An asset’s risk index is the sum of all the consequences of potential/future outages, usually expressed in monetary terms. Often, the risk index is linked to a failure rate (or frequency), which may be affected by that asset’s condition index.

    Example of Risk Function (Health Index vs. Failure Rate)
    As power grids get smarter, utilities have access to new data that can help them manage grid assets far more effectively. But which factors are most important to watch closely? In a recent presentation to the Hong Kong Institution [...]
    As power grids get smarter, utilities have access to new data that can help them manage grid assets far more effectively. But which factors are most important to watch closely? In a recent presentation to the Hong Kong Institution of Engineers, Jorge Martinez (Product Manager at Siemens Smart Grid Solutions & Services) explained how transmission and distribution network operators can use data to enhance asset management strategies. The presentation was based on a Siemens paper prepared for this conference and entitled “Listen to Your Assets! Developing More Effective Asset Management Strategies. ” The paper is co-authored by Mr.
    Peter Dunker, Mr. Juan Carlos Ledezma, Mr.

    Armando Ferreira and Dr.
    Ramón Nadira. Asset Performance Management (APM) vastly improves reliability while cutting costs. This is why ISO 55000 (the latest international standard for infrastructure asset management) recognizes and recommends APM.
    Siemens Network Services practices APM every day.

    Studies have shown that a large percentage of power outages are predictable, and therefore preventable with appropriately timed interventions (such as regular or emergency maintenance, refurbishment or retrofit, or replacement). This represents a tremendous opportunity for asset owners and operators.
    Listening to your assets involves capturing, processing, analyzing and ultimately acting upon information about grid assets — as well as about how your assets are functioning as part of your overall system.

    Data-enhanced asset management strategies can help utilities address key challenges such as: Maximizing grid performance. Determining the right to time to perform an asset intervention. Anticipating asset failures more accurately, and estimating useful life of equipment. Deciding whether to follow the  manufacturer’s recommended maintenance schedule — and assessing associated risks.

    Key steps in listening to your assets: 1. Shift the basis of maintenance planning.

    The next stage in the evolution of asset management involves two practices: Condition Based Maintenance (CBM) and Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM). These use the current condition of assets (monitored in near-real time) to determine which interventions might be required  — before equipment failure and possible service outages occur. To make this shift, utilities must develop a condition index (sometimes called a health index) — a numerical representation of the estimated condition of a given asset. This metric is highly customized; it must precisely suit every asset type used by a particular system or utility.
    2. Rate the importance of specific assets.

    This involves developing indices to measure importance and criticality/risk.
    These indices must then be considered in context. For instance, the importance index for a specific asset can be integrated with that asset’s condition index. This can yield actionable recommendations for that asset.
    An asset’s risk index is the sum of all the consequences of potential/future outages, usually expressed in monetary terms.

    Often, the risk index is linked to a failure rate (or frequency), which may be affected by that asset’s condition index. Example of Risk Function (Health Index vs.
    Failure Rate) Metrics for importance and risk provide a quantitative estimate of how important the assets are, in terms of their failure rates. That is, when using CBM and RCM practices, failure rates are not necessarily constant (since they depend on asset condition). Criticality and importance indices help utilities set priorities so they can gain maximum value from limited operating budgets.
    However, risk assessment must go beyond calculating importance indices to also estimate costs associated with the consequences of asset failure — for instance, operating losses due to power outages. 3. Turn metrics into strategy.
    Combine the results of assessing asset condition with rating asset importance to produce more effective asset management actions, strategies, and plans that balance the costs of risk mitigation, with expected network performance and maintenance or intervention costs.

    Learn more about APM: Read Listen to Your Assets! Developing More Effective Asset Management Strategies, a new Siemens paper co-authored by Mr. Peter Dunker, Mr. Juan Carlos Ledezma, Mr. Armando Ferreira and Dr.
    Ramón Nadira. Siemens Network Services Questions? Please comment below or contact us.

    More specialty utility support services from Siemens.
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    For Important Tumor-Suppressing Protein, Context is Key

    Illustration of p53 binding to major categories of repeats in the human genome, such as LTR, SINE and LINE.
    Scientists from the US Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have learned new details about how an important tumor-suppressing protein, called p53, binds to the human genome. As with many things in life, they found that context [...]
    Scientists from the US Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have learned new details about how an important tumor-suppressing protein, called p53, binds to the human genome. As with many things in life, they found that context makes a big difference. The researchers mapped the places where p53 binds to the genome in a human cancer cell line. They compared this map to a previously obtained map of p53 binding sites in a normal human cell line.
    These binding patterns indicate how the protein mobilizes a network of genes that quell tumor growth. They found that p53 occupies various types of DNA sequences, among them are sequences that occur in many copies and at multiple places in the genome.

    These sequences, called repeats, make up about half of our genome, but their function is much less understood than the non-repeated parts of the genome that code for genes.

    It’s been known for some time that p53 binds to repeats, but the Berkeley Lab scientists discovered something new: The protein is much more enriched at repeats in cancer cells than in normal cells. The binding patterns in these cell lines are very different, despite the same experimental conditions. This is evidence, they conclude, that in response to the same stress signal, p53 binds to the human genome in a way that is selective and dependent on cell context—an idea that has been an open question for years. Illustration of p53 binding to major categories of repeats in the human genome, such as LTR, SINE and LINE.
    The research is published online Nov. 21 in the journal PLOS ONE.

    “It is well established that p53 regulates specific sets of genes, depending on the cell type and the DNA damage type.
    But how that specificity is achieved, and whether p53 binds to the genome in a selective manner, has been a matter of debate. We show that p53 binding is indeed selective and dependent on cell context,” says Krassimira Botcheva of Berkeley Lab’s Life Sciences Division. She conducted the research with Sean McCorkle of Brookhaven National Laboratory.
    What exactly does cell context mean in this case? The DNA that makes up the genome is organized into chromatin, which is further packed into chromosomes.

    Different cell types differ by their chromatin state. Cancer can change chromatin in a way that doesn’t affect DNA sequences, a type of change that is called epigenetic.
    The new research indicates that epigenetic changes to chromatin may have a big impact on how p53 does its job. “To understand p53 tumor suppression functions that depend on DNA binding, we have to examine these functions in the context of the dynamic, cancer-associated epigenetic changes,” says Botcheva. Their finding is the latest insight into p53, one of the most studied human proteins.
    For the past 35 years, scientists have explored how the protein fights cancer. After DNA damage, p53 can initiate cell cycle arrest to allow time for DNA repair. The protein can promote senescence, which stops a cell from proliferating.
    It can also trigger cell death if the DNA damage is severe. Much of this research has focused on how p53 binds to the non-repeated part of the genome, where the genes are located.

    This latest research suggests that repeats deserve a lot of attention too.
    “Our research indicates that p53 binding at repeats could be essential for maintaining the genomic stability,” says Botcheva. “Repeats could have a significant impact on the way the entire p53 network is mobilized to ensure tumor suppression. ” The research was supported by the U.
    S.

    Department of Energy’s Office of Science.  ### Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory addresses the world’s most urgent scientific challenges by advancing sustainable energy, protecting human health, creating new materials, and revealing the origin and fate of the universe.
    Founded in 1931, Berkeley Lab’s scientific expertise has been recognized with 13 Nobel prizes. The University of California manages Berkeley Lab for the U. S.
    Department of Energy’s Office of Science. For more, visit www. lbl.
    gov. DOE’s Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, and is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time.

    For more information, please visit the Office of Science website at science.
    energy. gov/.

    Additional information: The paper, “Cell Context Dependent p53 Genome-Wide Binding Patterns and Enrichment at Repeats,” is published Nov. 21, 2014 in the journal PLOS ONE. .
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    Stephen Pryor to Retire as President of ExxonMobil Chemical Company; Expected Appointment of Neil Chapman as President of ExxonMobil Chemical Company

    Dateline City: IRVING, Texas IRVING, Texas--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Stephen D. Pryor, president, ExxonMobil Chemical Company and vice president of Exxon Mobil Corporation (NYSE:XOM), has elected to retire on January 1, 2015, after more than 44 years of service. It is anticipated [...]
    Dateline City: IRVING, Texas IRVING, Texas--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Stephen D.

    Pryor, president, ExxonMobil Chemical Company and vice president of Exxon Mobil Corporation (NYSE: XOM), has elected to retire on January 1, 2015, after more than 44 years of service. It is anticipated that the board of directors of Exxon Mobil Corporation will appoint Neil A. Chapman as president of ExxonMobil Chemical Company and elect him a vice president of the corporation, effective Jan. 1, 2015.
    Chapman is currently senior vice president, Polymers, ExxonMobil Chemical Company. Pryor, 64, joined Mobil Corporation in 1971 and has held a number of financial and managerial positions in the United States, Cyprus, the United Kingdom and New Zealand.

    In 1993, he was appointed vice president, Mobil Chemical Company and general manager, Plastics Division.
    In 1996, he became president, Mobil Asia Pacific and in 1998, executive vice president responsible for Mobil’s international downstream business. Following the merger between Exxon and Mobil, he was appointed president of ExxonMobil Lubricants & Specialties Company, and in 2002 became executive vice president, ExxonMobil Chemical Company. He was appointed president of ExxonMobil Refining & Supply Company in 2004 and president of ExxonMobil Chemical Company in 2008.
    Pryor was born in New York, NY.

    He holds a bachelor’s degree in biology from Lafayette College and a master’s degree in business administration from Harvard University. Chapman, 52, joined Esso Chemical in 1984 at the Esso refinery in Fawley, UK.
    He advanced through a series of engineering, operations, planning and marketing roles in various chemicals affiliates in the United Kingdom, Belgium, United States and Hong Kong. After the merger, Chapman was Chemicals sales manager in Asia Pacific and project executive of the Fujian Integrated Refining and Ethylene Joint Venture Project in China. In 2002 he joined the Fuels Marketing division as head of ExxonMobil Aviation International Ltd.
    in the United Kingdom before becoming vice president, Industrial and Wholesale Fuels based in the United States. Chapman became vice president, Global Polyethylene Business Unit of ExxonMobil Chemical Company in 2005 and was appointed executive assistant to the chairman of Exxon Mobil Corporation in 2006. He became president of ExxonMobil Global Services Company in 2007 and was appointed to his current role in 2011.
    Chapman was born in Stoke-on-Trent, England. He received his bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering from Surrey University, England.

    About ExxonMobil ExxonMobil, the largest publicly traded international oil and gas company, uses technology and innovation to help meet the world’s growing energy needs.
    ExxonMobil holds an industry-leading inventory of resources, is the largest refiner and marketer of petroleum products, and its chemical company is one of the largest in the world. Follow ExxonMobil on Twitter at www. twitter.
    com/exxonmobil.

    Language: English Contact: ExxonMobilMedia Relations, 972-444-1107 Ticker Slug: Ticker: XOM Exchange: NYSE
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    Larger-than-life energy facts around the SOV

    Did you know that a service operation vessel (SOVs) adds more time to a service day? And have you heard that it is able to outwit high waves with its motion-compensated gangway? Are you wondering how technicians live on [...]
    Did you know that a service operation vessel (SOVs) adds more time to a service day? And have you heard that it is able to outwit high waves with its motion-compensated gangway? Are you wondering how technicians live on a floating workshop? In this blogpost we provide you with an infographic that collects interesting facts around the new SOVs. Service offshore vessels taking shape Over summer several hands contributed to put our SOVs into shape. The first SOV hull was built at the Cemre shipyard in Turkey. It arrived at the Havyard shipyard in Norway in August – it’s final building site.
    Soon the first SOV will be ready for docking out and first sea trials. Meanwhile the second SOV hull was launched in Turkey end of September.

    The body is right now being towed to Norway where it will meet its sister vessel late October.
    If everything goes according to plan, the two vessels will leave Norway early 2015 and become operational at the Baltic II and Butendiek offshore wind power plants in Germany. The fleet is growing With the growing number of large scale offshore wind power plants the need grows for purpose built service vessels. Just two months ago, Siemens’ customer Vattenfall decided to go for a combined service concept for their projects Sandbank and DanTysk in the German North Sea.
    The projects lie only 20 kilometers away.

    Service will center on a new SOV that will take up position between the two wind farms. A helicopter will provide additional deployment readiness to enable crew to be ferried between land, the SOV and the wind turbines, irrespective of weather and sea conditions.
    Another SOV is in the pipeline for Gemini, the largest Dutch offshore project owned by the Gemini consortium. Over 15 years, an SOV in combination with a helicopter will be based at the wind power plant. Facts and figures around the SOVs Everyone knows a service van.
    It comes when you have troubles with your household appliance or in case you need yearly maintenance of your heating system at home. One or two service experts are mobilized and equip the van with tools and spare parts. It will probably take them some travelling time to get to your home and breaks might expand the service visit.
    Would you be able to visualize a large offshore service ship such easily? Certainly it also contains an area for spare parts. It brings many service experts to a site.

    They stay at sea for several weeks but need to return to port at some point.
    We collected the most interesting facts in an infographic and a cross section allows you a view into the SOVs’ belly.   If you want to learn more about our new SOVs in the meantime, you can find plenty of facts here. And if you’re into Twitter, why not follow #MakingWaves to keep up to date?For questions or remarks on the Siemens SOVs, feel free to leave a comment on this page.
    We will be pleased to discuss your questions and comments with our experts and provide comprehensive answers.

    More information: video: Taking offshore wind service into new waters blogpost: Come on board and follow the SOVs!blogpost: In a pioneering project, no detail is insignificantblogpost: Finding the right partner was the toughest challenge
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    Presentation of the Four-Phase Plan – The feasible complete solution to saline wastewater disposal

    Hesse’s Environmental Minister Priska Hinz and Norbert Steiner, Chairman of the K+S Board of Executive Directors, together explained the advantages of the Four-Phase Plan for a permanent solution to the saline wastewater problem at today’s meeting of the Round Table [...]
    Hesse’s Environmental Minister Priska Hinz and Norbert Steiner, Chairman of the K+S Board of Executive Directors, together explained the advantages of the Four-Phase Plan for a permanent solution to the saline wastewater problem at today’s meeting of the Round Table on “Werra/Weser water protection and potash production. ” “The Four-Phase Plan aims at achieving a feasible solution to saline wastewater disposal in the Werra potash district,” said Norbert Steiner. “This jointly reached compromise deserves to be put into practice. ” Those making detailed or general criticisms should bear in mind what progress is being made in terms of water quality and securing jobs.
    The condition of the water in the Werra and the Weser will continue to improve as a result of the action plan. In the long term, the Werra and the Upper Weser will even regain freshwater quality.

    Among other things, the plan provides for the construction of a long-distance pipeline to the Upper Weser.
    This would become operational in 2021.

    Addressing the concern of some critics that the water quality in the Weser would suffer as a result of the pipeline, Steiner remarked: “There will be no deterioration in the Weser. ” Aside from further relief to the environment, the agreement would contribute to securing the K+S sites in the Werra potash district. The Four-Phase Plan would apply until after production is discontinued and would secure the more than 7,000 jobs associated with potash production in the region. “This gives us a planning framework which we as a commodities company need, in order to be able to mine potash crude salt at the Werra for several more decades and thus manufacture in Germany products that are in global demand,” commented Steiner.
    K+S would therefore be prepared to make a further enormous financial effort. The Company would additionally invest approximately € 400 million in the measures agreed on.

    With the inclusion of the obligations as part of the package of measures started in 2011, K+S’ capital expenditure in water protection at the Werra would thus total approximately € 800 million euros.
    This would constitute a clear commitment to the German production sites. “With the Four-Phase Plan, the Hesse state government and K+S have jointly created the basis for addressing the disposal issues of the potash sites at the Werra once and for all,” said Steiner at the meeting. “The Plan is an acceptable compromise uniting social, economic and ecological interests.
    ” About K+S K+S is an international resources company.

    We have been mining and processing mineral raw materials for 125 years. The products we produce from them are used worldwide in agriculture, food and road safety and are important elements in numerous industrial processes.

    The nutrients potash and salt are accompanying the megatrend for the future: A constantly growing global population is becoming increasingly prosperous and striving for a more modern standard of living, which results in an increasing consumption of mineral raw materials. We serve the resulting growth in demand from production sites in Europe, North America and South America as well as through a global distribution network. K+S is the world’s largest salt producer and one of the top potash providers worldwide. With more than 14,000 employees, K+S achieved revenues in financial year 2013 of about € 4 billion and an EBIT of € 656 million.
    K+S is the commodities stock on the German DAX index. Learn more about K+S at www.

    k-plus-s.
    com.
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    Go Behind the Scenes at Carnegie Mellon School of Art Open Studio, Dec. 5

    Open Studio Day
    By Pam Wigley / 412-268-1047 / and Lauren Goshinski /  412-268-1533                          PITTSBURGH—The School of Art at Carnegie Mellon University will host its seventh annual Open Studio from 5-10 p.m., Friday, Dec. 5, in [...]
    By Pam Wigley / 412-268-1047 / and Lauren Goshinski /  412-268-1533                          PITTSBURGH—The School of Art at Carnegie Mellon University will host its seventh annual Open Studio from 5-10 p. m. , Friday, Dec. 5, in the College of Fine Arts building.
    Free and open to the public, this event offers a behind-the-scenes look at more than 50 undergraduate and graduate artist studios with work-in-progress spanning sculpture, painting, video, gaming, performance, interactive art and more. A holiday art sale, interdisciplinary project presentations, and reception with food, drink and music from WRCT 88.

    3FM DJs, and a live band round out the night.

    RSVP on Facebook Share your experience! #cmuopenstudio Twitter @CMUSchoolofArt / Instagram @cmuart Preview what's in store on the Open Studio Tumblr with links to artist portfolios and video profiles: http://cmuopenstudio. tumblr. com. VIDEO PROFILES: Meet - Justin Old Meet - Mishq Laliwala Meet - Nicole AndersonSchedule of events: 5-10 p.
    m. Studio Tours, Art Sale, Class Project Presentations - CFA 3rd & 4th floors Junior, senior and MFA students open their doors to the public, while a school-wide art sale features a broad selection of finished work for sale from students across all years.

    5-6:30 p.
    m. BXA Freshman Presentations - CFA Room 303 "Remixing the Wunderkammer" is the culmination of a semester spent thinking about the interdisciplinary nature of creative and scholarly life, exploring topics such as representation across media, remix and adaptation, dream logic and reality, aesthetic vocabularies, collections and curation, intellectual property and the instability of meaning. 6:30 p.
    m.

    Reception - CFA 4th Floor With WRCT 88. 3FM DJs  k r a e j i , Salem, Alphonse, DavisGalvin and live improvisational jazz trio Ada.
    7-10 p. m. Building BXA Lounge - Exhibition & Builder's Presentation - CFA Lower Level South Stairwell This collaborative installation by students in BXA Intercollege Degree Programs is an interactive pop-up lounge for the campus community.
    It is dedicated to interdisciplinary exploration at the intersection between artistic and academic scholarship. The Building BXA Lounge will be open from December 2-12. ### More than 50 student art studios will be open to public from 5-10 p.
    m. , Friday, Dec.

    5 in the College of Fine Arts building.

    Pictured above: Jessica Aguero's studio, Open Studio portrait sessions, 2013.
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    Image of the Week: Freud’s Porcupine

    L0077373 Porcupine model, bronze
    In honour of The Institute of Sexology opening yesterday at Wellcome Collection, we’ve decided to showcase a very special object from the exhibition. This little porcupine has been gaining quite a bit of attention recently, but we feel that [...]
    In honour of The Institute of Sexology opening yesterday at Wellcome Collection, we’ve decided to showcase a very special object from the exhibition. This little porcupine has been gaining quite a bit of attention recently, but we feel that it is well deserved. What is the link between porcupines and sexology you may wonder? Whilst many objects in the exhibition have an obvious link to the study of sex and sexuality, this innocent looking porcupine may seem a little out of place amongst the phallic amulets and Wilhelm Reich’s Orgone Accumulator, parodied by Woody Allen as the “Orgasmatron”. This bronze porcupine was kept on Sigmund Freud’s desk.
    He thought it represented the prickliness of human relationships. Porcupines crowd together when cold; however their sharp quills cause them to move away from each other when they get too close.

    This forces them to shift closer and then further apart until a balance of proximity is found.
    Freud used this to illustrate how people can both benefit from and be harmed by those they are most intimate with. The porcupine, on loan from the Freud Museum, was a gift to Freud from James Jackson Pullman, a neurologist and psychologist. This isn’t the only porcupine to feature in the Institute of Sexology – they are also featured in footage of the mating practices of animals, from the archives of the Kinsey Institute.
    Originally an entomologist, Alfred Kinsey was interested in animal mating rituals as well as those of humans.

    The practices of porcupines were of particular interest to Kinsey and his colleagues. When perceptive to mating, the female lays her quills flat and curves her tail over her back so that she doesn’t impale the male.
    In other words, porcupines mate carefully. The Wellcome Collection invites you to “undress your mind” with their free exhibition, The Institute of Sexology – now open (running until 20th September 2015).

    Image Credit: ©Freud Museum, LondonFiled under: Wellcome Collection, Wellcome Featured Image Tagged: Freud, image of the week, The Institute of Sexology, Wellcome Collection
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    The fallacy of the ideal entry level job out of college

    Sisyphus.png
    I was talking with an individual this week that was looking at accepting their first ‘real’ job. They were torn between the job that was offered and the job they really wanted to have. They were also debating about [...]
    I was talking with an individual this week that was looking at accepting their first ‘real’ job. They were torn between the job that was offered and the job they really wanted to have. They were also debating about the constraints this job would put on their personal life. Since they have a background in the sciences I advised them to break it down.

    Will this job: Give them greater flexibility to do the kind of things they really want to do – than you have right now?Provide experience that would look good to future employers in the areas where they’d like to work - in the future?Allow them to develop skills they know will be valuable both now and in the future?Have a culture that you can survive and even thrive?Put food on the table – right now?I think they were having a bit of an issue with a big decision that definitely thrust them into the real word. I told them that everyone changes jobs many times in their lives. This is only the start, not the end. My own philosophy is that after 2 years, I am part of the problem not part of the solution – so I tend to move around organizations quite a bit.
    I also described to the person that this whole idea of a work-life balance is a ‘first world problem’. Sure it is great to talk about when you have fluid cash and time on your hands, but it gets down to the fact that there is only life.

     Work, leisure, personal goals - they all drain from the same pool.
    You can’t spend your entire life looking for greener grass, when you don’t yet even have a yard. After working as long as I have, it can be enlightening to help someone with these kinds of decisions. They are the ones that will need to pick up ‘the next big thing’ and do something with it – and hopefully pay taxes along the way to support people like me once I’m gone.
    Of course if they really get desperate they can flip a coin that usually makes the decision your subconscious has made for you a bit clearer.

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    Shedding UV light on skin color

    Variation in complexion may have evolved to protect folate from UV irradiation
    For a long time it was believed that dark complexion evolved to protect humans from skin cancer. However, this theory has a flaw: melanoma typically is contracted after the reproductive age. Hence, the traditional theory for complexion cannot be correct [...]
    For a long time it was believed that dark complexion evolved to protect humans from skin cancer.

    However, this theory has a flaw: melanoma typically is contracted after the reproductive age. Hence, the traditional theory for complexion cannot be correct because melanoma does not impact evolution. Recently Nina Jablonski has hypothesized that like chimpanzees, our ancient ancestors in Africa originally had fair skin covered with hair. When they lost body hair in order to keep cool through sweating, perhaps about 1.
    5 million years ago, their naked skin became darker to protect it from folate-destroying UV light. Neural tube birth defects such as spina bifida are linked to deficiencies in folate, a naturally occurring form of vitamin B; Nina Jablonski learned that sunlight can destroy folate circulating in the tiny blood vessels of the skin.

    Furthermore, lower vitamin D weakens the immune response to the mycobacterium that causes tuberculosis.
    With this there is a strong evolutionary explanation for complexion variation. If you live in a Silicon Valley hacker dojo or wear a burka, do not forget your vitamin B pills!Read the article in Science 21 November 2014: Vol. 346 no.
    6212 pp.

    934-936 DOI: 10. 1126/science. 346. 6212.
    934.
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    Media Advisory: Carnegie Mellon To Unveil New Lunar Rover, "Andy"

    By Byron Spice / 412-268-9068Event: Carnegie Mellon University will unveil Andy, a four-wheeled robot designed to scramble up steep slopes and survive the temperature swings and high radiation encountered while exploring the Moon's pits, caves and polar ice. The robot [...]
    By Byron Spice / 412-268-9068Event: Carnegie Mellon University will unveil Andy, a four-wheeled robot designed to scramble up steep slopes and survive the temperature swings and high radiation encountered while exploring the Moon's pits, caves and polar ice. The robot is Carnegie Mellon's contribution to an effort led by Pittsburgh's Astrobotic Technology to land a robot on the Moon and win the $20 million-plus Google Lunar XPrize. Students performed much of the work over the past nine months to build Andy. The project has involved expertise and resources from across the university, including the School of Computer Science, the College of Engineering, the College of Fine Arts and the Mellon College of Science.
    Who: William "Red" Whittaker, director of the Field Robotics Center, will be available, as will numerous students, faculty and staff members who have been involved in the project. When: 10 a.

    m.
    , Monday, Nov.

    24Where: Planetary Robotics Laboratory, first floor of the Gates and Hillman Centers, 4902 Forbes Ave. Parking is available in the Gates Center parking garage. To reach the Gates Center garage, take Neville Street south from Fifth Avenue, go under the Forbes Avenue bridge and turn left into the driveway leading to the Collaborative Innovation Center. Keep to the right, go through the building and follow the drive, which will take a sharp left and go underneath a second building.
    (You're almost there!) The Gates Center will be ahead and to your left. ###.

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    LHCb Experiment Confirms TRIUMF Prediction

    20 November 2014 On Wednesday, November 19th, the LHCb collaboration at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) announced the discovery of two new particles in the baryon family. The LHCb experiment discovered two new baryons and verified TRIUMF’s Richard Woloshyn [...]
    20 November 2014 On Wednesday, November 19th, the LHCb collaboration at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) announced the discovery of two new particles in the baryon family. The LHCb experiment discovered two new baryons and verified TRIUMF’s Richard Woloshyn and York University’s Randy Lewis prediction about bottom baryons. read more.
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    Erosion may trigger earthquakes

    Researchers from laboratories at Géosciences Rennes (CNRS/Université de Rennes 1) , Géosciences Montpellier (CNRS/Université de Montpellier 2) and Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris (CNRS/IPGP/Université Paris Diderot), in collaboration with a scientist in Taiwan, have shown that surface processes, [...]
    Researchers from laboratories at Géosciences Rennes (CNRS/Université de Rennes 1) , Géosciences Montpellier (CNRS/Université de Montpellier 2) and Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris (CNRS/IPGP/Université Paris Diderot), in collaboration with a scientist in Taiwan, have shown that surface processes, i. e. erosion and sedimentation, may trigger shallow earthquakes (less than five kilometers deep) and favor the rupture of large deep earthquakes up to the surface. Although plate tectonics was generally thought to be the only persistent mechanism able to influence fault activity, it appears that surface processes also increase stresses on active faults, such as those in Taiwan, one of the world's most seismic regions.
    The work is published in on 21 November 2014.
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