SAVE THE DATE: EIT ICT Labs Partner Event 2015

SAVE THE DATE - the EIT ICT Labs Partner Event 2015 - focus on results, impact and Call 2016! EIT ICT Labs Partner Event 2015 will be held in Trento, Italy on April 15-16 with Action Line Preparation Workshops on [...]
SAVE THE DATE - the EIT ICT Labs Partner Event 2015 - focus on results, impact and Call 2016! EIT ICT Labs Partner Event 2015 will be held in Trento, Italy on April 15-16 with Action Line Preparation Workshops on April 17. The theme of the Partner Event 2015 is "Sustain our Vision" and the programme will focus on the achievements and impact of EIT ICT Labs as well as the Call 2016. Look forward to an engaging and productive event that will cover presentations on the state of affairs, the call process and guidelines, inspirational talks, start-up success stories, workshops and great networking opportunities. The number of participants is limited to 400 people.
EIT ICT Labs aims to ensure participation of all those who wish to attend. However, each event has a limited capacity, and to guarantee a fair balance amongst nodes and partners, EIT ICT Labs may have to restrict attendance.

Priority will be given to those with clear connection to the Call 2016.
Invitations and more information will come in January 2015. EIT ICT Labs.
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What ails our horse chestnut trees and can we save them?

One pupil’s scientific drawing of the tiny leaf-miner larva

Michael writes, “Over the past few months I have been visiting Dr Pari Collis and her pupils at La Sainte Union school in Camden, London as part of a Royal Society partnership grant. Based on my experience with Conker Tree Science, I helped the girls begin a project on the horse-chestnut leaf miner, but with their teacher they took it so much further than I thought they would."Not only did they undertake careful ecological studies, but they also covered biochemistry and environmental ethics, mixed with a little bit of German, maths and art! My final visit to the school was last week when they gave an excellent presentation of their project in front of an audience of teachers and parents.
"It has been a privilege to work with Dr Collis and the girls over the past year and share moments of scientific discovery and excitement with them. I would highly recommend using the Royal Society partnership grants for any scientist to link with a local secondary school."

The pupils at La Sainte Union school have written up their project and submitted it for peer review at the Young Scientists Journal. Below is an abridged version of their full article:


"Horse chestnut trees are ornamental trees and were largely planted for their attractive shape and beautiful flowers which make them really desirable in parks and village greens. We noticed that there was extensive early browning of the horse chestnut trees in our school grounds, which we found was caused by the horse-chestnut leaf-miner, Cameraria ohridella. Both the horse chestnut tree and the Cameraria ohridella are invasive species but we consider the moths to be pests because they harm the trees that we chose to plant.We worked in groups to visually estimate the number of horse chestnut leaf miner in one tree. We counted the number of the leaf miners in a small section of the tree and then scaled up to estimate that there were 250,000 – 500,000 leaf miners per tree.
Making careful observations of  horse-chestnut leaves
The common horse chestnut Aesculus hippocastanum is very susceptible to infestation by the leaf miner, but we found that the red-flowering hybrid (Aesculus x carnea) is very resistant. The mass of the red flowered horse chestnut tree leaves was approximately twice that of the white flowered trees (0.02 compared to 0.01 g per cm2). The caterpillars seem unable to feed successfully on these leaves.We wanted to find out if anything could be done to stop the moths. We investigated the following possibilities of control:
  • Natural predators (parasitoid wasp and blue tit);
  • Pheromone traps that attract and kill male moths;
  • Collecting and burning or burying fallen leaves in autumn to destroy the overwintering pupae.

Natural pest controllers: Leaves from an infected horse chestnut tree were collected and stored in zip-lock bags for two weeks on a cool and dark shelf. We then recorded the number of adult Cameraria ohridella moths and parasitoid pest controllers. There were 171 wasps altogether (19% of the total) which means 171 horse chestnut tree leaf miner larvae were killed by the larvae of the parasitic wasps.
Pupils ready for the big sweep to 

collect fallen horse chestnut leaves


Blue tits have discovered that horse chestnut trees are absolutely loaded with caterpillars. Caterpillars are an important food source for blue tits, which feed them to their young. If blue tits were to start eating a substantial amount of the caterpillars it would help the horse chestnut tree. We examined the leaves for v-shaped tears as evidence of ‘bird attack’ and found 0 to 57 bird attacks per leaf.Pheromone traps: The main component of the sex attractant (pheromone) released by the females of the horse chestnut leaf miner has been identified as E,Z-8,10-Tetradecadienal12. We used pheromone traps to catch male moths which reduces mating and therefore egg laying. We weighed the content of the trap and estimated that 30,000 moths had been captured over a period of two months. This is about a tenth of the number we had estimated on each tree in July after the 1st generation.Clearing leaf litter: Early in the season (July), we noticed that the browning of the leaves is more prominent at the base of the tree. This is consistent with the moths emerging from the fallen leaves and spreading upwards first to the lower leaves. We collected fallen leaves from under the horse chestnut tree and found an average of 100 pupae per leaf. If we estimate that there could be at least 100 fallen leaves in the vicinity of the tree, then 10,000 moths could emerge. If half of these are females, which lay 30 eggs each, we could expect 150,000 moths at the end of the first generation and 2,250,000 eggs at the end of the second generation. In reality the number will be smaller because not all pupae, moths or eggs will survive. Nonetheless the number of potential moths is formidable bearing in mind that the calculation is based on just 100 leaves.It may be time for the UK to follow Berlin’s example where there is a programme encouraging everyone to take part in raking up and clearing every single horse chestnut tree leaf. It is considered to be every citizen’s civic duty to participate in the clearing of the leaves. Involving the community in this way may have many social benefits encouraging social interaction, interest and responsibility for the environment."
A guest blog from pupils of La Sainte Union School, Camden, London.Dr Michael Pocock, an ecologist at CEH, is one of the scientists behind Conker Tree Science. Thanks to a Royal Society partnership grant, he recently shared some of his [...]
A guest blog from pupils of La Sainte Union School, Camden, London. Dr Michael Pocock, an ecologist at CEH, is one of the scientists behind Conker Tree Science. Thanks to a Royal Society partnership grant, he recently shared some of his knowledge and skills with students at a school in London. >>One pupil’s scientific drawing of the tiny leaf-miner larvaMichael writes, “Over the past few months I have been visiting Dr Pari Collis and her pupils at La Sainte Union school in Camden, London as part of a Royal Society partnership grant.
Based on my experience with Conker Tree Science, I helped the girls begin a project on the horse-chestnut leaf miner, but with their teacher they took it so much further than I thought they would. "Not only did they undertake careful ecological studies, but they also covered biochemistry and environmental ethics, mixed with a little bit of German, maths and art! My final visit to the school was last week when they gave an excellent presentation of their project in front of an audience of teachers and parents.

"It has been a privilege to work with Dr Collis and the girls over the past year and share moments of scientific discovery and excitement with them.
I would highly recommend using the Royal Society partnership grants for any scientist to link with a local secondary school. "The pupils at La Sainte Union school have written up their project and submitted it for peer review at the Young Scientists Journal.

Below is an abridged version of their full article: "Horse chestnut trees are ornamental trees and were largely planted for their attractive shape and beautiful flowers which make them really desirable in parks and village greens. We noticed that there was extensive early browning of the horse chestnut trees in our school grounds, which we found was caused by the horse-chestnut leaf-miner, Cameraria ohridella. Both the horse chestnut tree and the Cameraria ohridella are invasive species but we consider the moths to be pests because they harm the trees that we chose to plant. We worked in groups to visually estimate the number of horse chestnut leaf miner in one tree.
We counted the number of the leaf miners in a small section of the tree and then scaled up to estimate that there were 250,000 – 500,000 leaf miners per tree. >Making careful observations of  horse-chestnut leavesThe common horse chestnut Aesculus hippocastanum is very susceptible to infestation by the leaf miner, but we found that the red-flowering hybrid (Aesculus x carnea) is very resistant.

The mass of the red flowered horse chestnut tree leaves was approximately twice that of the white flowered trees (0.
02 compared to 0. 01 g per cm2). The caterpillars seem unable to feed successfully on these leaves.
We wanted to find out if anything could be done to stop the moths.

We investigated the following possibilities of control: Natural predators (parasitoid wasp and blue tit);Pheromone traps that attract and kill male moths;Collecting and burning or burying fallen leaves in autumn to destroy the overwintering pupae. Natural pest controllers: Leaves from an infected horse chestnut tree were collected and stored in zip-lock bags for two weeks on a cool and dark shelf. We then recorded the number of adult Cameraria ohridella moths and parasitoid pest controllers. There were 171 wasps altogether (19% of the total) which means 171 horse chestnut tree leaf miner larvae were killed by the larvae of the parasitic wasps.
>Pupils ready for the big sweep to collect fallen horse chestnut leavesBlue tits have discovered that horse chestnut trees are absolutely loaded with caterpillars. Caterpillars are an important food source for blue tits, which feed them to their young.

If blue tits were to start eating a substantial amount of the caterpillars it would help the horse chestnut tree.
We examined the leaves for v-shaped tears as evidence of ‘bird attack’ and found 0 to 57 bird attacks per leaf. Pheromone traps: The main component of the sex attractant (pheromone) released by the females of the horse chestnut leaf miner has been identified as E,Z-8,10-Tetradecadienal12. We used pheromone traps to catch male moths which reduces mating and therefore egg laying.
We weighed the content of the trap and estimated that 30,000 moths had been captured over a period of two months.

This is about a tenth of the number we had estimated on each tree in July after the 1st generation. Clearing leaf litter: Early in the season (July), we noticed that the browning of the leaves is more prominent at the base of the tree.
This is consistent with the moths emerging from the fallen leaves and spreading upwards first to the lower leaves. We collected fallen leaves from under the horse chestnut tree and found an average of 100 pupae per leaf. If we estimate that there could be at least 100 fallen leaves in the vicinity of the tree, then 10,000 moths could emerge.
If half of these are females, which lay 30 eggs each, we could expect 150,000 moths at the end of the first generation and 2,250,000 eggs at the end of the second generation. In reality the number will be smaller because not all pupae, moths or eggs will survive. Nonetheless the number of potential moths is formidable bearing in mind that the calculation is based on just 100 leaves.
It may be time for the UK to follow Berlin’s example where there is a programme encouraging everyone to take part in raking up and clearing every single horse chestnut tree leaf. It is considered to be every citizen’s civic duty to participate in the clearing of the leaves.

Involving the community in this way may have many social benefits encouraging social interaction, interest and responsibility for the environment.
">Michael Pocock and several of the studentsBy: Tito A, Ursula A, Elisabeth A, Sharon B, Ariane F, Grace G, Catriona G, Zoe H, Oghogho I, Dea L, Mia O, Lara R, Hannah S and Ellie T (La Sainte Union School, London). Dr Pari Collis is the science teacher at La Sainte Union school who invited Michael to visit and she concludes:  We really enjoyed working with Dr Michael Pocock.  Michael’s enthusiasm was absolutely infectious and it kept everyone on board.
The girls did outdoor science, learnt how to be observant and use scientific method.

 They improved their communication skills, worked as a team and showed commitment to the project. Under Dr Pocock’s guidance they also learnt to read original scientific papers for themselves.
Most importantly they took an interest in their surroundings, seeing them in a different light, and in particular have become extremely fond of horse chestnut trees and conkers.  They discussed the project and shared their enthusiasm with their friends and family. It has been a great pleasure to have worked with Michael and to share and discuss our findings with him.
 Additional informationMichael has also recently written about his life in science for Catalyst magazine, which is produced to inspire secondary school pupils about science. Royal Society Partnership GrantsConker Tree ScienceStaff page of Dr Michael Pocock.
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Pit Boss Reflects on Bot Challenge

robot-stacking at 2015 FIRST Robotics competition
Hi everyone, from BBQ to robots all in the same week! This past weekend I had the privilege to volunteer at the FIRST™ Robotics Competition (FRC) NY Tech Valley Regional at RPI.  And, I mean it was a privilege. It [...]
Hi everyone, from BBQ to robots all in the same week! This past weekend I had the privilege to volunteer at the FIRST™ Robotics Competition (FRC) NY Tech Valley Regional at RPI.   And, I mean it was a privilege. It is amazing and inspirational watching and talking with all of the teams. Seeing them work together, competing against each other and at the same time cheering each other on.
Seeing examples of gracious professionalism as teams helped each other with programming, robot repairs, sharing parts and equipment — it is awe-inspiring! FIRST™ stands for “For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology. ” According to Dean Kamen, founder of FIRST, the group’s mission is to “inspire young people to be science and technology leaders, by engaging them in exciting mentor-based programs that build science, engineering and technology skills, that inspire innovation, and that foster well-rounded life capabilities including self-confidence, communication, and leadership.

” FIRST reaches out to kids of all ages starting children as young as 6 years old with the FIRST Junior Lego™ League for grades K-3.
They can then move on to FIRST Lego League for grades 4-8, FIRST Tech Challenge for grades 7-12 and the FIRST Robotics Competition for grades 9-12. According to their website, 367,655 kids participated in FIRST’s 2014 season — that is a lot of STEM!! Each year a new challenge is created at each of the different levels. Students on FRC teams are given 6 weeks (from January through mid-February) to build a solution to the challenge.
  Each team obtains a kit of allowable parts in order to keep the playing field level among the teams.

Six weeks — that is truly a FastWorks program! What is really amazing is what the teams do with the parts of the kits. No two robots turn out the same.
Each has its own look and configuration based on the strategy of each team’s inventors. This year I was a robot inspector and I was in the pits watching all the teams working on their bots. As robot inspectors we are not there to find fault with anyone’s robot but instead we are there to inspect the robots for qualified parts, correct wiring schema, provide SW version control, and assure safety to other robots, people, and the playing field.
If a team’s robot was not qualified, we worked with them to get it within spec and qualified so every team could compete. The challenge this year was Recycle Rush. The robots had to stack gray totes on top of each other.
If they could also place a green recycling container on top of the stack, they received extra points. Getting “litter” (in the shape of a pool noodle) into the recycling container garnered the teams even more points.

There is a 15-second autonomous mode where the robot operates independently of the driver then a 2-minute 15-second tele-operated period.
  Teams qualify in the first round and then form alliances based on each team’s strengths and weaknesses for the quarter-final, semi-final, and final rounds. For instance, one team may be able to stack totes with high reliability but cannot pick up recycling containers. They would want to be in an alliance with a team that had a configuration to easily pick up recycle containers so they could build complete stacks.
In fact, the winning alliance scored big with this field worth over 180 points! You can see the entire event by clicking HERE to view the webcast.

Containers and “llitter” are stacked high by robots at the 2015 FIRST Robotics Competition GE Global Research Technology Director Danielle Merfeld speaking at opening ceremonies of the 2015 FIRST Robotics Competition. GE had a table in the lobby showing 3D printing and robotics, manned by many volunteers including Bob Tait and Huan Tan.
Thanks also to GE volunteers Mark Cheverton, Colton Robtoy, Vadim Bromberg, James Yang, and to everyone from the GE Global Research Additive Manufacturing and Robotics labs, for their onsite support. GE also sponsored Teams 20 (Shenendehowa), 250 (Colonie), 3044 (Ballston Spa) and 340 (Rochester). On the competition field, Team 3044 captained the 7th-ranked alliance and made it into semifinals; Team 20 captained the 5th-ranked alliance and made it into finals; and Team 340 was picked into the 2nd-ranked alliance, which won the event.
All three exceeded their own expectations. Local Teams 3044 (Ballston Spa, top), 250 (South Colonie, bottom right) and 20 (Shenendehowa, bottom left) at the NY Tech Valley FIRST Robotics Competition On the awards front, Teams 20 & 3044 had students selected as FIRST Dean’s List Finalists; Team 250 won the Industrial Safety Award and Team Spirit Award; and Team 20 won a Safety “Hard Hat” Award. Special thanks to Doug Wildes, GRC’s Team 20 mentor and FIRST Robotics Competition Lead for GE, for summarizing the results and providing these links.
Other honorable mentions that I personally loved go to Team 5240 from Utica, they must have heard about my SxSW adventure because they gave me a bottle homemade BBQ sauce! Team 263 which had a CRAZY, WILD, MANIC autonomous mode, throwing containers and slamming totes, Team 5240 from Clarkson which designed their robot collaboratively from remote locations with 3D parts and put it all together when they met for the first time, and HVCC which gave EVERY student local to this area a coupon to take a free 3-credit course at HVCC.

That’s awesome!!! GE volunteers were among the judges at the 2015 FIRST Robotics Competition, including (from left) Prabjot Singh and Andrea Schmitz In addition to the teams sponsored by GE, other local teams include: 4508 (Schuylerville), 2791 (Shaker), 1493 (Albany), 3687 (Schenectady), 1665 (Hudson), 5149 (Troy) and for all the proud parents of the local teams pictured here! In closing, I urge you all to volunteer! If not at this event, then some other event. Helping a child learn math and science is one of the most rewarding things a person could do. It influences and will stay with them the rest of their lives! The post Pit Boss Reflects on Bot Challenge appeared first on GE Global Research. .
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American Society for Environmental History Honors Joel Tarr with Distinguished Service Award

Joel Tarr
By Shilo Rea / 412-268-6094 / shilo@cmu.edu Carnegie Mellon University’s Joel Tarr, who has spent his career studying the environmental history of cities and the history and impact of their technological systems, was awarded the 2015 Distinguished Service Award by [...]
By Shilo Rea / 412-268-6094 / shilo@cmu. edu Carnegie Mellon University’s Joel Tarr, who has spent his career studying the environmental history of cities and the history and impact of their technological systems, was awarded the 2015 Distinguished Service Award by the American Society for Environmental History (ASEH). The ASEH gives the award each year to an individual who has contributed significantly to the development of the organization. Tarr received the award at the society’s annual conference in Washington, D.
C. , on March 21.

Caroline Acker, head of the Department of History in the Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences, said that the field of environmental history is on the rise as issues like climate change and global warming take on urgency.
She believes Tarr's work has been critical. “Joel was a pioneer in environmental history that brought cities into environmental studies. Environmental history is one of the most dynamic areas of history today and Joel's research into the infrastructure development that knitted cities into systems is one of the reasons,” Acker said.
Tarr, the Richard S.

Caliguiri University Professor of History and Policy in the History Department, has additional appointments in the H. John Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management and the Department of Engineering and Public Policy.
A CMU faculty member since 1967, he has received numerous other honors, including the Society for the History of Technology’s Leonardo da Vinci Medal. The society's highest honor, the da Vinci medal goes to an individual who has made an outstanding contribution to the history of technology through research, teaching, publication and other activities. He also received CMU’s Robert Doherty Prize for Educational Leadership in 1991.
Tarr has served on National Research Council committees dealing with issues of urban infrastructure, public transit and water pollution. He was president of the Public Works Historical Society in 1982-83 and president of the Urban History Association in 1999. “I am deeply honored to receive this award from the American Society of Environmental History,” Tarr said.
“I am especially proud of the fact that this award, as well as the other awards I have received from the professional organizations in the specialties of technological and urban history, reflects the interdisciplinary orientation I have absorbed at Carnegie Mellon. It has been a privilege to be at this university for these many years.

” For more information on Tarr, visit http://www.
history. cmu. edu/faculty/tarr.
html.

Joel Tarr (pictured above), the Richard S. Caliguiri University Professor of History and Policy in the History Department, has spent his career studying the environmental history of cities and the history and impact of their technological systems.
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Telecontrol and many more thrilling topics: Four days at Wasser International come to an end

Rolf Pillath, Petra Geiss and René Jacobs from Siemens' booth team (from left to right) were very pleased with the response at the booth. The Wasser Berlin International trade fair was a resounding success for Siemens with lots of interesting [...]
Rolf Pillath, Petra Geiss and René Jacobs from Siemens' booth team (from left to right) were very pleased with the response at the booth. The Wasser Berlin International trade fair was a resounding success for Siemens with lots of interesting conversations, valuable user feedback, and a great atmosphere. Experts from around the globe gathered at this leading trade fair for the water industry from March 24 to 27. Telecontrol technology and process instrumentation attracted particularly strong interest.
Our experts won over visitors with innovative products and coordinated systems. Solutions for efficient water use and treatment were also on the minds of many visitors.

They learned about innovative drive systems, turbocompressors, and integrated solutions for plant and automation engineering at the Siemens booth.
Suggestions for future developmentOur experts were particularly pleased with the large number of satisfied users who made extremely positive remarks about Siemens' products, systems, and solutions. Many conversations revolved around specific ways of refining our products¬ – valuable firsthand information that we can take back home. "We are very pleased that our customers showed interest in the entire breadth of our portfolio," said Rolf Pillath, Senior System Specialist for Water & Wastewater at Siemens.
International, interesting, and informative – our four days in Berlin will stay with us over the coming weeks and months.

We are using your feedback to further improve our range of products and services. Find out more about our solutions for automation in the water industry.
Thanks, Berlin. We'll see you again in two years’ time!   .
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Physics Madness: The Elemental Eight

Half the field, twice the fun. Which physics machine will win it all? The first round of Physics Madness is over and the field has narrowed to eight amazing physics machines. The second round of voting is now open, so [...]
Half the field, twice the fun. Which physics machine will win it all? The first round of Physics Madness is over and the field has narrowed to eight amazing physics machines. The second round of voting is now open, so pick your favorites and send them on to the Fundamental Four. You have until midnight PDT on Monday, March 30, to vote in this round.
Come back on March 31 to see if your pick advanced and vote in the next round. .

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Events - Interested in EU funding? Did you know that you have to comply with article 32? - 5-9 October 2015, Brussels

Come along to our info-day together with your institution's HR Manager to find out more. This event addresses all beneficiaries and potential applicants of H2020 contracts/projects who need to comply with article 32 stipulating the obligation to take measures [...]
Come along to our info-day together with your institution's HR Manager to find out more. This event addresses all beneficiaries and potential applicants of H2020 contracts/projects who need to comply with article 32 stipulating the obligation to take measures to implement the European Charter and Code (C & C) for the benefit of all researchers and their institution. The purpose of the event is to fully inform ‘newcomers’ (research institutions and funders) on the principles of Charter and Code and their implementation in the research institution via a step-wise procedure called the Human Resources Strategy for Researchers (HRS4R). Successful implementation is awarded by the Commission Services and evidences compliance with article 32 of your H2020 grant agreement.
Please note that this is a one-day event and that the precise date will be communicated as soon as it is known. This notice is in order to ascertain the level of interest in order to book the necessary facilities.

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Levee detonations reduced 2011 flood risk on Mississippi River, UCI-led study finds

a boat crew in the Mississippi River
A controversial decision in 2011 to blow up Mississippi River levees reduced the risk of flooding in a city upstream, lowering the height of the rain-swollen river just before it reached its peak, according to a newly published computer [...]
A controversial decision in 2011 to blow up Mississippi River levees reduced the risk of flooding in a city upstream, lowering the height of the rain-swollen river just before it reached its peak, according to a newly published computer modeling analysis led by the University of California, Irvine, scientists.

Full story at http: //news. uci. edu/press-releases/levee-detonations-reduced-2011-flood-risk-on-mississippi-river-uci-led-study-finds/SourceUniversity of California, IrvineThis is an NSF News From the Field item.
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CMU study finds location sharing by apps prompts privacy action

screen shot of a daily message, or privacy nudge
Many smartphone users know that free apps sometimes share private information with third parties but few, if any, are aware of how frequently this occurs. An experiment at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) shows that when people learn exactly how many [...]
Many smartphone users know that free apps sometimes share private information with third parties but few, if any, are aware of how frequently this occurs. An experiment at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) shows that when people learn exactly how many times these apps share that information they rapidly act to limit further sharing.

Full story at http: //www. cmu. edu/news/stories/archives/2015/march/privacy-nudge. htmlSourceCarnegie Mellon UniversityThis is an NSF News From the Field item.
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UCSF team finds key to making neurons from stem cells

cluster of neurons
A research team at the University of California, San Francisco, has discovered an RNA molecule called Pnky that can be manipulated to increase the production of neurons from neural stem cells. Full story at http://www.ucsf.edu/news/2015/03/123906/ucsf-team-finds-key-making-neurons-stem-cells Source University of California, San Francisco [...]
A research team at the University of California, San Francisco, has discovered an RNA molecule called Pnky that can be manipulated to increase the production of neurons from neural stem cells.

Full story at http: //www. ucsf. edu/news/2015/03/123906/ucsf-team-finds-key-making-neurons-stem-cellsSourceUniversity of California, San FranciscoThis is an NSF News From the Field item.
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NC State researchers create 'nanofiber gusher'

polymer nanofibers in liquid
Researchers at North Carolina (NC) State University and one of its startup companies report a method that can produce unprecedented amounts of polymer nanofibers in liquid, which have potential applications in filtration, batteries and cell scaffolding. Full story at [...]
Researchers at North Carolina (NC) State University and one of its startup companies report a method that can produce unprecedented amounts of polymer nanofibers in liquid, which have potential applications in filtration, batteries and cell scaffolding.

Full story at https: //news. ncsu. edu/2015/03/velev-nanofiber-gusher/SourceNorth Carolina State UniversityThis is an NSF News From the Field item.
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Halliburton and Baker Hughes Announce Approval of Transaction By Stockholders of Both Companies

HOUSTON – March 27, 2015 – Halliburton Company (NYSE: HAL) today announced that its stockholders approved Halliburton's proposal to issue shares of Halliburton common stock as contemplated by its merger agreement with Baker Hughes Incorporated (NYSE: BHI).
HOUSTON – March 27, 2015 – Halliburton Company (NYSE: HAL) today announced that its stockholders approved Halliburton's proposal to issue shares of Halliburton common stock as contemplated by its merger agreement with Baker Hughes Incorporated (NYSE: BHI). .
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Pioneer Natural Resources Announces First Quarter 2015 Earnings Press Release Date and Conference Call

DALLAS--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Mar. 27, 2015-- Pioneer Natural Resources Company (“Pioneer”) (NYSE:PXD) today announced its first quarter 2015 earnings press release is scheduled to be issued after the close of trading on the New York Stock Exchange on Tuesday, May 5, 2015. [...]
DALLAS--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Mar.

27, 2015-- Pioneer Natural Resources Company (“Pioneer”) (NYSE: PXD) today announced its first quarter 2015 earnings press release is scheduled to be issued after the close of trading on the New York Stock Exchange on Tuesday, May 5, 2015.

A conference call is scheduled for Wednesday, May 6, 2015 at 9: 00 a. m. Central Time to discuss the first quarter results. Instructions on how to listen to the call and view the accompanying presentation are shown below.

Internet: www. pxd. com Select “Investors” then “Earnings & Webcasts” to listen to the discussion and view the prese….
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Sharper nanoscopy

the interference between light & radiation
The advent of super-resolved microscopy with visible light won this year's chemistry Nobel Prize. Joint Quantum Institute scientists have discovered how to make nanoscale images even sharper. Full story at http://jqi.umd.edu/news/sharper-nanoscopy-0 Source Joint Quantum Institute This is an NSF News [...]
The advent of super-resolved microscopy with visible light won this year's chemistry Nobel Prize.  Joint Quantum Institute scientists have discovered how to make nanoscale images even sharper.

Full story at http: //jqi. umd. edu/news/sharper-nanoscopy-0SourceJoint Quantum InstituteThis is an NSF News From the Field item.
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Events - Project Management and Administration in Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions - 21 April 2015, Helsinki, Finland

The training provides a basic understanding of project management and administration issues in H2020 MSCAs. The focus of the day will specifically be on Innovative Training Networks (ITN), Individual Fellowships (IF) and Research and Innovation Staff Exchange (RISE). The training [...]
The training provides a basic understanding of project management and administration issues in H2020 MSCAs. The focus of the day will specifically be on Innovative Training Networks (ITN), Individual Fellowships (IF) and Research and Innovation Staff Exchange (RISE). The training can be followed via webcast. Please note the start is 9.
30 Finnish time, so 8. 30 CET if you are following the webcast.

Kindly register here for the event and webcast by 13 April.
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Tesoro Corporation Begins Restart of Martinez Refinery and Updates First Quarter Guidance

SAN ANTONIO - March 27, 2015 - Tesoro Corporation (NYSE:TSO) today announced that the Martinez, California refinery has begun the restart process. "We are pleased to have reached an agreement with the local union at our Martinez, California refinery and [...]
SAN ANTONIO - March 27, 2015 - Tesoro Corporation (NYSE: TSO) today announced that the Martinez, California refinery has begun the restart process. "We are pleased to have reached an agreement with the local union at our Martinez, California refinery and are commencing the restart process today," said Greg Goff, Chairman and CEO.   "The facility should be back to normal operating levels over the next two weeks. " The Martinez, California refinery was in the final stages of major turnaround maintenance activity when the United Steelworkers Union (USW) issued a strike notice on February 1st.
The safest option at that time was to safely idle the remaining operating units and tr….
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Image of the Week: Structure of the dynactin complex

This image shows a model of a tiny protein machine that moves things around within our cells. A new study reveals how the motor called dynein (grey) is attached to its cargo via an adaptor protein (orange). The attachment requires the [...]
This image shows a model of a tiny protein machine that moves things around within our cells.  A new study reveals how the motor called dynein (grey) is attached to its cargo via an adaptor protein (orange). The attachment requires the help of another protein complex called dynactin (multi-coloured). The dynein/dynactin machine drags its cargo along […].
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